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Is there a way to prevent the usage of the default constructor?

All I can think of is throwing an exception, but I would like something that causes a compile time error.

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3  
You may run into trouble if you do this: In .NET a default parameterless constructor is necessary for a number of things (binding/serialization/etc.). Consider having defaults for whatever values you need to set via constructor params. This may not matter in your case, but it's worth mentioning. –  SnOrfus May 20 '10 at 16:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 39 down vote accepted
  • If everything in the class is static, consider making it a static class. That way, you won't get a constructor at all.
  • If you want a parameterless constructor but you don't want it to be public, declare it explicitly and make it private (or internal etc)
  • If you don't want a parameterless constructor but do want constructors with parameters, then just declare those - the default constructor won't be generated for you

I think that should cover all bases...

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You said pretty much exactly what I was just typing :) –  Joel May 20 '10 at 16:10
    
I wish I knew about static classes long ago. –  luiscubal May 20 '10 at 17:13

Make it private.

So,

class SomeClass
{
    private SomeClass()
    {
    }

    public SomeClass(int SomeParam)
    {
    }
}
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+1 for to the point. –  corsiKa May 20 '10 at 16:03
3  
Unless you need it within the type (or nested types) you can remove it entirely here - it will only be generated if no constructors are explicitly declared. –  Jon Skeet May 20 '10 at 17:17
    
@Jon I'm usually a belt and suspenders kind of guy so I'd normally do it this way anyway; that way what I'm trying to do is clear to anyone looking at it. Good to know that it's handled automatically by the compiler, though, if I forget. –  Michael Todd May 20 '10 at 17:26
    
I would achieve that by adding a comment on the parameterful constructor: "If you remove this constructor, please make sure there's no public default constructor" or something along those lines. Currently this code is basically giving you permission to create an instance without any parameters within the class. It will also cause problems if there are any readonly variables, as you'd have to assign them values... –  Jon Skeet May 20 '10 at 17:35
    
@Jon As always, the devil's in the details (I hadn't thought about the ability to create a parameterless instance inside this class). Thanks very much for the tips. –  Michael Todd May 20 '10 at 17:44

You can just make it private:

private MyClass()
{
}

Alternatively (if you didn't know already) if you just declare a constructor with parameters, the default one isn't added by the compiler, e.g.

private MyClass(string myParameter)
{
    //Can't call new MyClass() anymore
}
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One thing to mention that others have not. The default constructor should still be able to set up the default implementation bits, to avoid reuse. This is not a problem if it is private, as you can still chain down to a private constructor. You just make it unavailable to outside sources.

private MyClass()
{
}

public MyClass(string something) : this()
{
}

That solves the problem. Note, however, that protected may actually be a preferred implementation if the class is not sealed.

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Aside from other answers, you can read following text, for more info on Singleton pattern, and some examples. Singleton pattern relies on constructor being private.

http://www.yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/singleton.html

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