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I want my accessory to be in a slightly different place than normal. Is it possible? This code has no effect:

cell.accessoryType =  UITableViewCellAccessoryDisclosureIndicator;
cell.accessoryView.frame = CGRectMake(5.0, 5.0, 5.0, 5.0);
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9 Answers 9

up vote 20 down vote accepted

No, you cannot move where the accessory view is. As an alternative you can add a subview like the following;

[cell.contentView addSubview:aView];

Also, by setting the accessoryView property equal to something, the accessoryType value is ignored.

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thanks. the reason I wanted to use the disclosure indicator was that it changed to white when the row was selected. there does not seem to be a way to change the accessoryView as soon as the cell is selected. –  cannyboy May 20 '10 at 17:45

There is a way to move default accessoryView, but its pretty hacky. So it might stop working one day when new sdk arrives.

Use at your own risk (this code snippet moves any accessoryView 8 pixels to the left, insert it inside -(void)layoutSubviews method of desired uitableviewcell subclass):

if (self.accessoryView) {
    r = self.accessoryView.frame;
    r.origin.x -= 8;
    self.accessoryView.frame = r;
} else {
    UIView* defaultAccessoryView = nil;
    for (UIView* subview in self.subviews) {
        if (subview != self.textLabel && 
            subview != self.detailTextLabel && 
            subview != self.backgroundView && 
            subview != self.contentView &&
            subview != self.selectedBackgroundView &&
            subview != self.imageView) {
            defaultAccessoryView = subview;
            break;
        }
    }
    r = defaultAccessoryView.frame;
    r.origin.x -= 8;
    defaultAccessoryView.frame = r;
}
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does in legal for appstore applictions? did some1 used it with success approvial? –  Valery Pavlov Oct 24 '11 at 22:23
5  
It doesn't use any private api so its legal. I used it and my app was successfully approved. On the other hand you have to understand that its not a part of public API either and therefore it can stop working any moment. –  Alexey Oct 25 '11 at 5:21
1  
My app passed validation too. Hide hack :) –  Valery Pavlov Feb 19 '12 at 12:15
    
Thanks Alexey, I've added a bit more of logic to your code. Find my solution below. –  Tomasz May 4 '13 at 20:16
1  
Also, anyone using this should know r should be declared as a CGRect... –  braden Oct 18 '13 at 0:05

I was able to change the accessory view's frame by simply doing this in my custom cell subclass.

CGRect adjustedFrame = self.accessoryView.frame;
adjustedFrame.origin.x += 10.0f;
self.accessoryView.frame = adjustedFrame;
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It works. If someone wants to try this answer, please put these lines of code in the subclass layoutSubviews method ; also don't forget to call [super layoutSubviews] in the layoutSubviews method's beginning. –  Erzékiel Mar 26 at 14:07

Maybe this will be sufficient for you:

UIImageView* accessoryImageView = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithFrame:
        CGRectMake(0, 0, accessoryImage.size.width + MARGIN_RIGHT, accessoryImage.size.height)];
accessoryImageView.contentMode = UIViewContentModeLeft;
accessoryImageView.image = accessoryImage;

self.accessoryView = accessoryImageView;

This way I added padding to the right, so accessory button looks shifted to the left. It has a wider area that responds to touches, that is the only side-effect.

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The above answers didn't work for me under ios 6.1. So I tried to use UIEdgeInsets, because the DetailDisclosure is a UIButton. And it works fine now. Here the source:

if (cell.accessoryType == UITableViewCellAccessoryDetailDisclosureButton) {
    UIView* defaultAccessoryView = [cell.subviews lastObject];
    if ([defaultAccessoryView isKindOfClass:[UIButton class]]){
        UIButton *bt = (UIButton*)defaultAccessoryView;            
        bt.contentEdgeInsets = UIEdgeInsetsMake(0, 0, 0, 10);
    }
}
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Another way to do this is to embed your custom accessory view in another view, that is set as the cell's accessory view and control the padding using the frame.

Here is an example with an image view as custom accessory view:

// Use insets to define the padding on each side within the wrapper view
UIEdgeInsets insets = UIEdgeInsetsMake(24, 0, 0, 0);

// Create custom accessory view, in this case an image view
UIImage *customImage = [UIImage imageNamed:@"customImage.png"];
UIImageView *accessoryView = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithImage:customImage];

// Create wrapper view with size that takes the insets into account 
UIView *accessoryWrapperView = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0, 0, customImage.size.width+insets.left+insets.right, customImage.size.height+insets.top+insets.bottom)];

// Add custom accessory view into wrapper view
[accessoryWrapperView addSubview:accessoryView];

// Use inset's left and top values to position the custom accessory view inside the wrapper view
accessoryView.frame = CGRectMake(insets.left, insets.top, customImage.size.width, customImage.size.height);

// Set accessory view of cell (in this case this code is called from within the cell)
self.accessoryView = accessoryWrapperView;
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I was working with the ios5 and the solution given by Alexey was not working entirely. I discovered that when an accessoryType is set on a table, the accessoryView is null so the first "if" was not working. I have changed a the code just a little:

if (self.accessoryType != UITableViewCellAccessoryNone) {
    UIView* defaultAccessoryView = nil;

    for (UIView* subview in self.subviews) {
        if (subview != self.textLabel && 
            subview != self.detailTextLabel && 
            subview != self.backgroundView && 
            subview != self.contentView &&
            subview != self.selectedBackgroundView &&
            subview != self.imageView &&
            subview != self.explanationButton && // Own button
            subview.frame.origin.x > 0 // Assumption: the checkmark will always have an x position over 0. 
            ) {
            defaultAccessoryView = subview;
            break;
        }
    }
    r = defaultAccessoryView.frame;
    r.origin.x -= 8;
    defaultAccessoryView.frame = r;

}

and this solution is working for me. As Alexey said, I don't know what is going to happen with future versions but at least in ios 4 is working.

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1  
Thanks Ana, I've added a bit more of logic to you code, to find the accessory view I look on the right side of the cell. –  Tomasz May 4 '13 at 20:14

The accessory view happens to be the last subview in UITableViewCell. So you can simplify:

if (self.accessoryType != UITableViewCellAccessoryNone) {
    UIView* defaultAccessoryView = [self.subviews lastObject];

    if (defaultAccessoryView){
        CGRect r = defaultAccessoryView.frame;
        r.origin.x -= 14;
        defaultAccessoryView.frame = r;
    }
}

This should go in your subclassed cell, in the (void)layoutSubviews method. But like the others said, not guaranteed to work in future versions of iOS.

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Following the solution given by Ana I tried to better detect the accessory view, I look on the right side of the cell.

Create a custom class that extends UITableViewCell and add this method:

- (void)layoutSubviews {
    [super layoutSubviews];

    if (self.accessoryType != UITableViewCellAccessoryNone) {
        float estimatedAccesoryX = MAX(self.textLabel.frame.origin.x + self.textLabel.frame.size.width, self.detailTextLabel.frame.origin.x + self.detailTextLabel.frame.size.width);

        for (UIView *subview in self.subviews) {
            if (subview != self.textLabel &&
                subview != self.detailTextLabel &&
                subview != self.backgroundView &&
                subview != self.contentView &&
                subview != self.selectedBackgroundView &&
                subview != self.imageView &&
                subview.frame.origin.x > estimatedAccesoryX) {

                // This subview should be the accessory view, change its frame
                frame = subview.frame;
                frame.origin.x -= 10;
                subview.frame = frame;
                break;
            }
        }
    } 
}
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