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Examples:

  1. "1 name": Should say it has characters
  2. "10,000": OK
  3. "na123me": Should say it has characters
  4. "na 123, 000": Should say it has characters
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3  
What do you mean by alphabets? Only alphabetic characters? /[a-zA-Z]*/ –  WhirlWind May 20 '10 at 18:42
2  
please clarify your question. –  Femaref May 20 '10 at 18:42
    
What do you mean by "find if string has alphabets"? Do you wanto to know if the string has some alphabetic character? –  goedson May 20 '10 at 18:43
1  
To clarify, you want to ask if a string has at least one alphabetic character? –  BalusC May 20 '10 at 18:53
    
@BalusC: Correct! –  Vishal May 20 '10 at 18:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The regular expression you want is [a-zA-Z], but you need to use the find() method.

This page will let you test regular expressions against input.

http://www.fileformat.info/tool/regex.htm

share|improve this answer
public class HasCharacters  {
    public static void main( String [] args ){
        if( args[0].matches(".*[a-zA-Z]+.*")){
            System.out.println( "Has characters ");
        } else {
            System.out.println("Ok");   
        }
    }
}

Test

$java HasCharacters "1 name" 
Has characters 
$java HasCharacters "10,000"
Ok
$java HasCharacters "na123me"
Has characters 
$java HasCharacters "na 123, 000" 
Has characters 
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1  
This doesn't work. Java regexes are by default bounded by ^ and $. Test with 1name yourself. –  BalusC May 20 '10 at 19:05
    
It fails for the first example –  Vishal May 20 '10 at 19:06
1  
Fixed and tested B-) –  OscarRyz May 20 '10 at 19:10
 public static void main(String[] args)

 {
     Pattern p = Pattern.compile("^([^a-zA-Z]*([a-zA-Z]+)[^a-zA-Z]*)+$");
     Matcher m = p.matcher("1 name");
     Matcher m1 = p.matcher("10,000");
     Matcher m2 = p.matcher("na123me");
     Matcher m3 = p.matcher("na 123, 000");
     Matcher m4 = p.matcher("13bbbb13jdfgjd43534 fkgdfkgjk34 rktekjg i54 ");

     if (m.matches())
         System.out.println(m.group(1));

     if (m1.matches())
         System.out.println(m1.group(1));

     if(m2.matches())
         System.out.println(m2.group(1));

     if(m3.matches())
         System.out.println(m3.group(1));

     if (m4.matches())
         System.out.println(m4.group(1));
 }

The above should match any letter in both lower and upper case. If the regex returns a match, the string has a letter in it.

Result

1 name

me

na 123, 000

i54

Statements that contain no letters do not match the expression.

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3  
If it matches, the string has only letters (A-Z) in it. –  Mark Byers May 20 '10 at 18:50
    
Should be fixed now. Thanks for letting me know. –  npinti May 20 '10 at 18:59
    
Fails with input: "11" –  OscarRyz May 20 '10 at 19:13
    
Regular expressions that begin with '^.*' or end with '.*$' are poorly written. Why not just use the regular expression '[a-zA-Z]'? –  David M May 20 '10 at 19:25
1  
@BalusC, incorrect! The matches() method uses the whole string, but the find() method does not. –  David M May 20 '10 at 19:33

With this line you can check if your string contains only of characters given by the regex (in this case a,b,c,...z and A,B,C,...Z):

boolean doesMatch = "your string".matches( "[a-zA-Z]*" );
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2  
that regex would match any string that has at least one alphabetic character –  Kip May 20 '10 at 18:46
    
I thought it would match any string that had precisely one alphabetic character, not just at least one. Doesn't it need an asterisk? –  Paul May 20 '10 at 18:47
1  
The question is unclear enough that you're both right. –  WhirlWind May 20 '10 at 18:49
1  
Doesnt * match zero to many? It should be + instead. –  Shervin Asgari May 20 '10 at 19:01
1  
This doesn't work. Java regexes are by default bounded by ^ and $. Test with 1name yourself. –  BalusC May 20 '10 at 19:05

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