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Just wondering if there are any kind of guidelines for when you are designing a document-oriented db and I am talking especially about CouchDb.

I know that being schemaless things can take the shape that we want but, are there any best practices?

Thanks in advance! =D

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Jan Lehnardt recently wrote up a useful overview of data modeling (I would not quite call it "schema" design as you correctly point out).

http://blog.couchbase.com/document-modeling-rules-thumb

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Thanks for the link! It has great info =D –  Hugo May 24 '10 at 18:20
    
The link is now blog.couchbase.com/document-modeling-rules-thumb –  Marcello Nuccio Aug 16 '11 at 9:54

I don't know specifically about CouchDB, but there is something over in the MongoDB Docs about Schema Design.

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this isn't as relevant for CouchDB. MongoDB requires consistent data schema for indexing, CouchDB does not. The map/reduce phase and normalize any schema-less data in to a unified index. –  mikeal May 21 '10 at 18:57
    
@mikeal, What do you mean with "MongoDB does require a consistent data schema for indexing. "? –  TTT May 21 '10 at 21:49
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MongoDB's indexes are based on keynames which means you can only have relationships with consistent data schemes. CouchDB's map/reduce allows you to introspect a document and emit a normalized index which means the data can be truly schema-less without limiting what can be indexed. –  mikeal May 25 '10 at 7:36
    
Ok maybe CouchDB offers more flexibility but MongoDB will not throw an error when a document doesn't have (one of) the keys that are indexed. –  TTT May 26 '10 at 17:55
    
Nor will CouchDB... –  Perry krug Sep 27 '11 at 21:54

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