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Can an unhandled exception in a C# application cause a blue screen of death?

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It's possible that the driver is expecting you to interact with it in particular ways, so, indirectly, an Exception could change the way you're interacting with the driver and then reveal an underlying flaw. If you can't update the driver, your best option is to narrow down the particular use case that triggers the nasty bug and work around it. –  Dan Bryant May 20 '10 at 22:32

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Not unless you're dealing with unmanaged resources like raw memory access. (In which case the Exception isn't likely the cause)

.NET Exceptions will be caught by the runtime environment. You can crash your PROGRAM but not the OS.

In my experience the only things that cause BSOD's are bad drivers, and hardware errors. (This of course is not an extensive list of the causes of BSOD, but that's the first place I look.)

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Unmanaged resources cannot cause a BSOD. –  Stephen Cleary May 20 '10 at 20:27
    
@Stephen Cleary: I'm fairly certain a call to unmanaged code that references a faulty driver could cause a BSOD, the point was that within the context of .NET (Where Exceptions live) you wont be causing BSOD's. Once you leave managed code, there's no guarantees. –  Aren May 20 '10 at 20:36
    
@Aren: What do you mean by, "a call to unmanaged code that references a faulty driver could cause a BSOD." Can you please elaborate? –  Jim Fell May 20 '10 at 20:38
    
A driver file (ser2pl.sys), which was installed for a USB-to-RS232 converter, is specifically called out as the problem on the BSOD. I've tried a number of different things, but (long story short) the BSOD only occurs on older systems (same OS: WinXP SP3) equipped with a legacy USB 1.1 root hub. However, other C# applciations using the same converter do not cause a crash. Changing the baud rate and driver port configuration seem to make no difference. –  Jim Fell May 20 '10 at 20:39
    
@Aren: No matter what functions you call in a driver (in this case, opening/closing/reading/writing), it's the driver's job to always prevent BSODs. .NET code cannot be blamed; it's a bug in the driver. –  Stephen Cleary May 20 '10 at 20:43

The only causes for a BSOD are hardware error, OS bug, or driver bug. .NET code cannot ever cause a BSOD.

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Yes, a driver file (ser2pl.sys), which was installed for a USB-to-RS232 converter, is specifically called out as the problem on the BSOD. I've tried a number of different things, but (long story short) the BSOD only occurs on older systems (same OS: WinXP SP3) equipped with a legacy USB 1.1 root hub. However, other C# applciations using the same converter do not cause a crash. Changing the baud rate and driver port configuration seem to make no difference. –  Jim Fell May 20 '10 at 20:36
    
I assume that's the result of a WinDbg analyze -v, which has a correct analysis at least 95% of the time, I'd say. Pretty much the only thing you can do is update the drivers (or instruct your clients to, if these are client machines). –  Stephen Cleary May 20 '10 at 20:38
    
Thanks. What is WinDbg? Is that part of C#, or is it used to report on the error on the BSOD? –  Jim Fell May 20 '10 at 20:53
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Ah, no. It's part of Debugging Tools for Windows. A BSOD will normally create a full dump or minidump (configurable under System Properties), and this dump file can be loaded into WinDbg. The most common procedure is to then type !analyze -v, which does an automated analysis of the BSOD, displaying the most likely culprit. –  Stephen Cleary May 20 '10 at 20:57

No; ideally, there should be no way to cause a BSOD from C#.

Show us the code that is causing it and we'll see if we can help.

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No, it wouldn't. That's not to say that you couldn't potentially cause a BSOD with a C# program, but if you did, it wouldn't be due to an unhandled exception being thrown.

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Yeah, it is possible, indirectly. There's plenty of unmanaged code you'll use when you work with namespaces like System.Management, System.Windows.Media, System.Drawing.Printing, System.IO.Ports. That code can issue device driver calls which can trigger a bug in the device driver. Blue screen is next.

Obviously the real problem is not in the managed code, it is a crummy driver.

But to answer the question directly: no, an unhandled managed exception cannot cause a BSOD.

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Can you share the code that interacts with your driver?

Either way, it looks like the driver itself is at fault here: A BSOD is the result of an unhandled crash in code running in the kernel (your driver in this case).

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