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I have a huge file that I must parse line by line. Speed is of the essence.

Example of a line:

Token-1   Here-is-the-Next-Token      Last-Token-on-Line
      ^                        ^
   Current                 Position
   Position              after GetToken

GetToken is called, returning "Here-is-the-Next-Token" and sets the CurrentPosition to the position of the last character of the token so that it is ready for the next call to GetToken. Tokens are separated by one or more spaces.

Assume the file is already in a StringList in memory. It fits in memory easily, say 200 MB.

I am worried only about the execution time for the parsing. What code will produce the absolute fastest execution in Delphi (Pascal)?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 28 down vote accepted
  • Use PChar incrementing for speed of processing
  • If some tokens are not needed, only copy token data on demand
  • Copy PChar to local variable when actually scanning through characters
  • Keep source data in a single buffer unless you must handle line by line, and even then, consider handling line processing as a separate token in the lexer recognizer
  • Consider processing a byte array buffer that has come straight from the file, if you definitely know the encoding; if using Delphi 2009, use PAnsiChar instead of PChar, unless of course you know the encoding is UTF16-LE.
  • If you know that the only whitespace is going to be #32 (ASCII space), or a similarly limited set of characters, there may be some clever bit manipulation hacks that can let you process 4 bytes at a time using Integer scanning. I wouldn't expect big wins here though, and the code will be as clear as mud.

Here's a sample lexer that should be pretty efficient, but it assumes that all source data is in a single string. Reworking it to handle buffers is moderately tricky due to very long tokens.

type
  TLexer = class
  private
    FData: string;
    FTokenStart: PChar;
    FCurrPos: PChar;
    function GetCurrentToken: string;
  public
    constructor Create(const AData: string);
    function GetNextToken: Boolean;
    property CurrentToken: string read GetCurrentToken;
  end;

{ TLexer }

constructor TLexer.Create(const AData: string);
begin
  FData := AData;
  FCurrPos := PChar(FData);
end;

function TLexer.GetCurrentToken: string;
begin
  SetString(Result, FTokenStart, FCurrPos - FTokenStart);
end;

function TLexer.GetNextToken: Boolean;
var
  cp: PChar;
begin
  cp := FCurrPos; // copy to local to permit register allocation

  // skip whitespace; this test could be converted to an unsigned int
  // subtraction and compare for only a single branch
  while (cp^ > #0) and (cp^ <= #32) do
    Inc(cp);

  // using null terminater for end of file
  Result := cp^ <> #0;

  if Result then
  begin
    FTokenStart := cp;
    Inc(cp);
    while cp^ > #32 do
      Inc(cp);
  end;

  FCurrPos := cp;
end;
share|improve this answer

Here is a lame ass implementation of a very simple lexer. This might give you an idea.

Note the limitations of this example - no buffering involved, no Unicode (this is an excerpt from a Delphi 7 project). You would probably need those in a serious implementation.

{ Implements a simpe lexer class. } 
unit Simplelexer;

interface

uses Classes, Sysutils, Types, dialogs;

type

  ESimpleLexerFinished = class(Exception) end;

  TProcTableProc = procedure of object;

  // A very simple lexer that can handle numbers, words, symbols - no comment handling  
  TSimpleLexer = class(TObject)
  private
    FLineNo: Integer;
    Run: Integer;
    fOffset: Integer;
    fRunOffset: Integer; // helper for fOffset
    fTokenPos: Integer;
    pSource: PChar;
    fProcTable: array[#0..#255] of TProcTableProc;
    fUseSimpleStrings: Boolean;
    fIgnoreSpaces: Boolean;
    procedure MakeMethodTables;
    procedure IdentProc;
    procedure NewLineProc;
    procedure NullProc;
    procedure NumberProc;
    procedure SpaceProc;
    procedure SymbolProc;
    procedure UnknownProc;
  public
    constructor Create;
    destructor Destroy; override;
    procedure Feed(const S: string);
    procedure Next;
    function GetToken: string;
    function GetLineNo: Integer;
    function GetOffset: Integer;

    property IgnoreSpaces: boolean read fIgnoreSpaces write fIgnoreSpaces;
    property UseSimpleStrings: boolean read fUseSimpleStrings write fUseSimpleStrings;
  end;

implementation

{ TSimpleLexer }

constructor TSimpleLexer.Create;
begin
  makeMethodTables;
  fUseSimpleStrings := false;
  fIgnoreSpaces := false;
end;

destructor TSimpleLexer.Destroy;
begin
  inherited;
end;

procedure TSimpleLexer.Feed(const S: string);
begin
  Run := 0;
  FLineNo := 1;
  FOffset := 1;
  pSource := PChar(S);
end;

procedure TSimpleLexer.Next;
begin
  fTokenPos := Run;
  foffset := Run - frunOffset + 1;
  fProcTable[pSource[Run]];
end;

function TSimpleLexer.GetToken: string;
begin
  SetString(Result, (pSource + fTokenPos), Run - fTokenPos);
end;

function TSimpleLexer.GetLineNo: Integer;
begin
  Result := FLineNo;
end;

function TSimpleLexer.GetOffset: Integer;
begin
  Result := foffset;
end;

procedure TSimpleLexer.MakeMethodTables;
var
  I: Char;
begin
  for I := #0 to #255 do
    case I of
      '@', '&', '}', '{', ':', ',', ']', '[', '*',
        '^', ')', '(', ';', '/', '=', '-', '+', '#', '>', '<', '$',
        '.', '"', #39:
        fProcTable[I] := SymbolProc;
      #13, #10: fProcTable[I] := NewLineProc;
      'A'..'Z', 'a'..'z', '_': fProcTable[I] := IdentProc;
      #0: fProcTable[I] := NullProc;
      '0'..'9': fProcTable[I] := NumberProc;
      #1..#9, #11, #12, #14..#32: fProcTable[I] := SpaceProc;
    else
      fProcTable[I] := UnknownProc;
    end;
end;

procedure TSimpleLexer.UnknownProc;
begin
  inc(run);
end;

procedure TSimpleLexer.SymbolProc;
begin
  if fUseSimpleStrings then
  begin
    if pSource[run] = '"' then
    begin
      Inc(run);
      while pSource[run] <> '"' do
      begin
        Inc(run);
        if pSource[run] = #0 then
        begin
          NullProc;
        end;
      end;
    end;
    Inc(run);
  end
  else
    inc(run);
end;

procedure TSimpleLexer.IdentProc;
begin
  while pSource[Run] in ['_', 'A'..'Z', 'a'..'z', '0'..'9'] do
    Inc(run);
end;

procedure TSimpleLexer.NumberProc;
begin
  while pSource[run] in ['0'..'9'] do
    inc(run);
end;

procedure TSimpleLexer.SpaceProc;
begin
  while pSource[run] in [#1..#9, #11, #12, #14..#32] do
    inc(run);
  if fIgnoreSpaces then Next;
end;

procedure TSimpleLexer.NewLineProc;
begin
  inc(FLineNo);
  inc(run);
  case pSource[run - 1] of
    #13:
      if pSource[run] = #10 then inc(run);
  end;
  foffset := 1;
  fRunOffset := run;
end;

procedure TSimpleLexer.NullProc;
begin
  raise ESimpleLexerFinished.Create('');
end;

end.
share|improve this answer
    
Using PChar directly rather than indexing, and copying the PChar location into a local so that a register can be allocated to it, are a couple of simple optimisations you could apply to your approach. Also, determining token type can be efficiently done with a case statement rather than table+func. –  Barry Kelly Nov 13 '08 at 20:40

I made a lexical analyser based on a state engine (DFA). It works with a table and is pretty fast. But there are possible faster options.

It also depends on the language. A simple language can possibly have a smart algorithm.

The table is an array of records each containing 2 chars and 1 integer. For each token the lexer walks through the table, startting at position 0:

state := 0;
result := tkNoToken;
while (result = tkNoToken) do begin
  if table[state].c1 > table[state].c2 then
    result := table[state].value
  else if (table[state].c1 <= c) and (c <= table[state].c2) then begin
    c := GetNextChar();
    state := table[state].value;
  end else
    Inc(state);
end;

It is simple and works like a charm.

share|improve this answer
    
DFA state transitions can be implemented as a table, yes, but a different way to implement them is implicitly via the program counter. It usually ends up being clearer and more efficient than a DFA, which are more suited to automatic generation. –  Barry Kelly Nov 13 '08 at 20:38

If speed is of the essence, custom code is the answer. Check out the Windows API that will map your file into memory. You can then just use a pointer to the next character to do your tokens, marching through as required.

This is my code for doing a mapping:

procedure TMyReader.InitialiseMapping(szFilename : string);
var
//  nError : DWORD;
    bGood : boolean;
begin
    bGood := False;
    m_hFile := CreateFile(PChar(szFilename), GENERIC_READ, 0, nil, OPEN_EXISTING, 0, 0);
    if m_hFile <> INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE then
    begin
    	m_hMap := CreateFileMapping(m_hFile, nil, PAGE_READONLY, 0, 0, nil);
    	if m_hMap <> 0 then
    	begin
    		m_pMemory := MapViewOfFile(m_hMap, FILE_MAP_READ, 0, 0, 0);
    		if m_pMemory <> nil then
    		begin
    			htlArray := Pointer(Integer(m_pMemory) + m_dwDataPosition);
    			bGood := True;
    		end
    		else
    		begin
//  			nError := GetLastError;
    		end;
    	end;
    end;
    if not bGood then
    	raise Exception.Create('Unable to map token file into memory');
end;
share|improve this answer
    
I read my file using TFileStream.Create, Read, TEncoding.GetBufferEncoding and Encoding.GetString. This load a StringList very fast. I understand that Memory mapped files are often faster for random access, but never for sequential access. Also I would still have to do the Encoding. –  lkessler Nov 18 '08 at 1:33

I think the biggest bottleneck is always going to be getting the file into memory. Once you have it in memory (obviously not all of it at once, but I would work with buffers if I were you), the actual parsing should be insignificant.

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Actually NOT. It took .04 seconds for a simple Read File of a 25 MB file into the Buffer and .17 seconds to Encode it (to convert ASCII to Unicode). Then it took 4.5 seconds to read the 25 million characters and parse out the parts of the line. So I need the speed in the parser. –  lkessler Nov 18 '08 at 6:21

This begs another question - How big? Give us a clue like # of lines or # or Mb (Gb)? Then we will know if it fits in memory, needs to be disk based etc.

At first pass I would use my WordList(S: String; AList: TStringlist);

then you can access each token as Alist[n]... or sort them or whatever.

share|improve this answer
    
No. It fits in memory easily. Say 200 MB. Assume it's already in a StringList. I'll edit the question and add clarify this. –  lkessler Nov 13 '08 at 19:50

Speed will always be relative to what you are doing once it is parsed. A lexical parser by far is the fastest method of converting to tokens from a text stream regardless of size. TParser in the classes unit is a great place to start.

Personally its been a while since I needed to write a parser, but another more dated yet tried and true method would be to use LEX/YACC to build a grammar then have it convert the grammar into code you can use to perform your processing. DYacc is a Delphi version...not sure if it still compiles or not, but worth a look if you want to do things old school. The dragon book here would be of big help, if you can find a copy.

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Rolling your own is the fastest way for sure. For more on this topic, you could see Synedit's source code which contains lexers (called highlighters in the project's context) for about any language on the market. I suggest you take one of those lexers as a base and modify for your own usage.

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The fastest way to write the code would probably be to create a TStringList and assign each line in your text file to the CommaText property. By default, white space is a delimiter, so you will get one StringList item per token.

MyStringList.CommaText := s;
for i := 0 to MyStringList.Count - 1 do
begin
  // process each token here
end;

You'll probably get better performance by parsing each line yourself, though.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry. I didn't mean the fastest way to "write" the code. I really wanted the code that would be fastest. I've now editing the question to make that obvious. –  lkessler Nov 13 '08 at 19:12

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