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I need to find out the number of rows affected by a rollback. How can I get this ? Please help.

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More info required: what do you mean by "affected" (c.f. paxdiablo's answer), and why do you need this? –  Jeffrey Kemp May 25 '10 at 7:06

4 Answers 4

Actually, the number of rows affected by a rollback is zero. That's because, technically, those rows aren't changed until a commit occurs (the A in ACID). And, if you're rolling back, the commit doesn't happen.

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that's what. I want to find out how many rows got rolled back. –  payal May 21 '10 at 4:37
    
@payal hes saying that since those rows/changes technically don't exist until you commit them, you'll probably have to keep track of them yourself. –  Lerxst May 21 '10 at 4:39
    
@payal, I don't think Oracle provides this info. Rollbacks (including to savepoints) don't change the ROWCOUNT so even trying to do this manually is going to be problematic. Perhaps if you could tell us why you need this, there may be a better way. –  paxdiablo May 21 '10 at 4:46

I dont know of a way to do this with oracle, but you could potentially keep track of your created/altered/deleted rows using SQL%ROWCOUNT so you know what will be affected in a rollback

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Consider a table fred with two columns (id, value) with two rows. The first row is (1,'Blue') and the second is (2,'Blue')

I issue the following statements

INSERT INTO fred VALUES (1,'Red'); [inserts 1 row]
UPDATE fred SET value = 'Blue';    [updates 3 rows but the value on 2 doesn't change]
UPDATE fred SET id = 3 WHERE id = 1; [updates 1 row]
ROLLBACK;

Both records originally in the table have been updated. 1 was updated twice. One row was inserted and then updated. Then all those changes were rolled back. The question is, what number do you want ? The number of records updated, or the total number of updates performed to records.

The easiest answer to get, from a technical point of view, is the statistic number of undo records applied. But you'd have to measure this before and after. Actually, it can get very confusing because with an UPDATE statement that hits concurrent activity, a statement may be stopped part way through, rolled back and restarted. Ref AskTom

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+1, mind you, undo records might be misleading in the case of rollback of recursive sql (e.g. delete cascades). –  Jeffrey Kemp Mar 28 '12 at 4:37
declare
  i number:=0;
begin
  INSERT INTO fred VALUES (1,'Red'); [inserts 1 row]
  i := i + sql%rowcount;
  UPDATE fred SET value = 'Blue';    [updates 3 rows but the value on 2 doesn't change]
  i := i + sql%rowcount;  
  UPDATE fred SET id = 3 WHERE id = 1; [updates 1 row]
  i := i + sql%rowcount;
  if <condition> then
      COMMIT;
      dbms_output.PUT_LINE(i || ' rows COMMITED';
      i := 0;
  else
      ROLLBACK;
      dbms_output.PUT_LINE(i || ' rows ROLLBACK';
      i := 0;
  end if;
end;
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Welcome on SO, here, it is a good practice to explain why to use your solution and not just how. That will make your answer more valuable and help further reader to have a better understanding of how you do it. I also suggest that you have a look on our FAQ : stackoverflow.com/faq. –  ForceMagic Oct 29 '12 at 15:53

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