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(Yes, I know that one machine instruction usually doesn't matter. I'm asking this question because I want to understand the pimpl idiom, and use it in the best possible way; and because sometimes I do care about one machine instruction.)

In the sample code below, there are two classes, Thing and OtherThing. Users would include "thing.hh". Thing uses the pimpl idiom to hide it's implementation. OtherThing uses a C style – non-member functions that return and take pointers. This style produces slightly better machine code. I'm wondering: is there a way to use C++ style – ie, make the functions into member functions – and yet still save the machine instruction. I like this style because it doesn't pollute the namespace outside the class.

Note: I'm only looking at calling member functions (in this case, calc). I'm not looking at object allocation.

Below are the files, commands, and the machine code, on my Mac.

thing.hh:

class ThingImpl;
class Thing
{
    ThingImpl *impl;
public:
    Thing();
    int calc();
};

class OtherThing;    
OtherThing *make_other();
int calc(OtherThing *);

thing.cc:

#include "thing.hh"

struct ThingImpl
{
    int x;
};

Thing::Thing()
{
    impl = new ThingImpl;
    impl->x = 5;
}

int Thing::calc()
{
    return impl->x + 1;
}

struct OtherThing
{
    int x;
};

OtherThing *make_other()
{
    OtherThing *t = new OtherThing;
    t->x = 5;
}

int calc(OtherThing *t)
{
    return t->x + 1;
}

main.cc (just to test the code actually works...)

#include "thing.hh"
#include <cstdio>

int main()
{
    Thing *t = new Thing;
    printf("calc: %d\n", t->calc());

    OtherThing *t2 = make_other();
    printf("calc: %d\n", calc(t2));
}

Makefile:

all: main

thing.o : thing.cc thing.hh
    g++ -fomit-frame-pointer -O2 -c thing.cc

main.o : main.cc thing.hh
    g++ -fomit-frame-pointer -O2 -c main.cc

main: main.o thing.o
    g++ -O2 -o $@ $^

clean: 
    rm *.o
    rm main

Run make and then look at the machine code. On the mac I use otool -tv thing.o | c++filt. On linux I think it's objdump -d thing.o. Here is the relevant output:

Thing::calc():
0000000000000000 movq (%rdi),%rax
0000000000000003 movl (%rax),%eax
0000000000000005 incl %eax
0000000000000007 ret
calc(OtherThing*):
0000000000000010 movl (%rdi),%eax
0000000000000012 incl %eax
0000000000000014 ret

Notice the extra instruction because of the pointer indirection. The first function looks up two fields (impl, then x), while the second only needs to get x. What can be done?

share|improve this question
    
Are you running with full optimization on? –  the_drow May 21 '10 at 8:25
1  
@the_drow: Just look at the Makefile. And no, he’s not. @Rob: try compiling with -O3 … any reason you’re not using full optimization? –  Konrad Rudolph May 21 '10 at 8:38
1  
You have to dereference the pointer at some point. There's no getting around it. –  Dennis Zickefoose May 21 '10 at 8:40
    
With -O3 I get the same result. –  Rob N May 21 '10 at 10:48
    
Thanks everyone. I accepted MSalters' answer because it directly answered my question. But as Marcelo said, the instruction may not cost anything. I can't detect a difference in run time on my computer. But I like knowing how to get rid of the instruction, just in case I run into a situation where measurements show that it matters. (And if I ever need to debate a C programmer about performance. :) –  Rob N May 21 '10 at 12:12

5 Answers 5

Not too hard, just use the same technique inside your class. Any halfway decent optimizer will inline the trivial wrapper.

class ThingImpl;
class Thing
{
    ThingImpl *impl;
    static int calc(ThingImpl*);
public:
    Thing();
    int calc() { calc(impl); }
};
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't avoid the double-indirection: this->impl->x. –  Marcelo Cantos May 21 '10 at 8:33
    
@Marcelo: It doesn't avoid it, but it should result in the generated assembly matching his calc(OtherThing*) routine, so the indirection is "hidden". There's no reason to clutter the class definition with a bunch of static wrapper functions, of course, since those can just be hidden in the implementation file. –  Dennis Zickefoose May 21 '10 at 9:01
    
+1, this->impl indirection should basically disappear in your code. You don't really have to do this though, just enable link-time code generation. –  avakar May 21 '10 at 9:20
    
I just confirmed that with MSalters' code, the compiler does get rid of the extra instruction. –  Rob N May 21 '10 at 11:11
    
@avakar: How do I enable link-time code generation with GCC? –  Rob N May 21 '10 at 11:26

One instruction is rarely a thing to spend much time worrying over. Firstly, the compiler may cache the pImpl in a more complex use case, thus amortising the cost in a real-world scenario. Secondly, pipelined architectures make it almost impossible to predict the real cost in clock cycles. You'll get a much more realistic idea of the cost if you run these operations in a loop and time the difference.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure what the best function is to use for profiling. But I #include'd <ctime> and called clock(), and there appears to be no difference in the run times. –  Rob N May 21 '10 at 11:01
    
Some careful coding and very long loops might show up some discrepancy, but your result doesn't surprise me. –  Marcelo Cantos May 21 '10 at 11:13

There's the nasty way, which is to replace the pointer to ThingImpl with a big-enough array of unsigned chars and then placement/new reinterpret cast/explicitly destruct the ThingImpl object.

Or you could just pass the Thing around by value, since it should be no larger than the pointer to the ThingImpl, though may require a little more than that (reference counting of the ThingImpl would defeat the optimisation, so you need some way of flagging the 'owning' Thing, which might require extra space on some architectures).

share|improve this answer
    
I had heard about this ugly, reinterpret_cast technique. I just tried it and it does remove the extra instruction. But the second thing you said -- passing by value -- doesn't seem to help. Calling t.calc() on a stack allocated Thing calls the same function with the extra instruction. –  Rob N May 21 '10 at 11:16
    
You can use intrusive reference counting on ThingImpl, since it's private anyway. That probably won't defeat the optimization as you put the reference counter in a (public base class of) ThingImpl, not Thing –  MSalters May 21 '10 at 12:17
    
@MSalters I suspect it would, as you would need to increment the count each time you passed the Thing to a function, and incrementing the count will probably take more operations than you save by not having an extra pointer indirection. –  Pete Kirkham May 21 '10 at 12:38
    
@Rob N what happens if you compare the code for a pass-by value function parameter and a reference or pointer parameter? The value should just have the one indirection, pointers and references two. –  Pete Kirkham May 21 '10 at 12:40
    
Pete, I assume you're right, but for now I was only interested in this case, where the function parameter was the implicit 'this' pointer. –  Rob N May 21 '10 at 15:33

Let the compiler worry about it. It knows far more about what is actually faster or slower than we do. Especially on such a minute scale.

Having items in classes has far, far more benefits than just encapsulation. PIMPL's a great idea, if you've forgotten how to use the private keyword.

share|improve this answer

I disagree about your usage: you are not comparing the 2 same things.

#include "thing.hh"
#include <cstdio>

int main()
{
    Thing *t = new Thing;                // 1
    printf("calc: %d\n", t->calc());

    OtherThing *t2 = make_other();       // 2
    printf("calc: %d\n", calc(t2));
}
  1. You have in fact 2 calls to new here, one is explicit and the other is implicit (done by the constructor of Thing.
  2. You have 1 new here, implicit (inside 2)

You should allocate Thing on the stack, though it would not probably change the double dereferencing instruction... but could change its cost (remove a cache miss).

However the main point is that Thing manages its memory on its own, so you can't forget to delete the actual memory, while you definitely can with the C-style method.

I would argue that automatic memory handling is worth an extra memory instruction, specifically because as it's been said, the dereferenced value will probably be cached if you access it more than once, thus amounting to almost nothing.

Correctness is more important than performance.

share|improve this answer
    
You missed the line in my question that says: "Note: I'm only looking at calling member functions (in this case, calc). I'm not looking at object allocation." –  Rob N May 21 '10 at 11:35
    
And I was challenging the necessity of your question. Pimpl brings RAII as well as insulation while C-style only brings insulation. Thus my conclusion that I am ready to let go of one cycle in my CPU at each function call (for a value that any good compiler would cache if called in a tight loop) in exchange for RAII (thus ensured correctness). –  Matthieu M. May 21 '10 at 12:18

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