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A small problem. Any idea guys why this does not work?

int? nullableIntVal = (this.Policy == null) ? null : 1;

I am trying to return 'null' if the left hand expression is True, else 1. Seems simple but gives compilation error -

Type of conditional expression cannot be determined because there is no implicit conversion between 'null' and 'int'

If I replace the " ? null : 1 " with any valid int, then there is no problem.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Yes - the compiler can't find an appropriate type for the conditional expression. Ignore the fact that you're assigning it to an int? - the compiler doesn't use that information. So the expression is:

(this.Policy == null) ? null : 1;

What's the type of this expression? The language specification states that it has to be either the type of the second operand or that of the third operand. null has no type, so it would have to be int (the type of the third operand) - but there's no conversion from null to int, so it fails.

Cast either of the operands to int? and it will work, or use another way of expessing the null value - so any of these:

(this.Policy == null) ? (int?) null : 1;

(this.Policy == null) ? null : (int?) 1;

(this.Policy == null) ? default(int?) : 1;

(this.Policy == null) ? new int?() : 1;

I agree it's a slight pain that you have to do this.


From the C# 3.0 language specification section 7.13:

The second and third operands of the ?: operator control the type of the conditional expression. Let X and Y be the types of the second and third operands. Then,

  • If X and Y are the same type, then this is the type of the conditional expression.

  • Otherwise, if an implicit conversion (§6.1) exists from X to Y, but not from Y to X, then Y is the type of the conditional expression.

  • Otherwise, if an implicit conversion (§6.1) exists from Y to X, but not from X to Y, then X is the type of the conditional expression.

  • Otherwise, no expression type can be determined, and a compile-time error occurs.

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1  
sickeningly comprehensive... –  David Neale May 21 '10 at 10:51
    
insanely precise and accurate. –  this. __curious_geek May 21 '10 at 10:53
    
@David: It wasn't comprehensive before I had the quote from the language spec. I feel better about it now :) –  Jon Skeet May 21 '10 at 10:57
    
@Jon: Very nice answer indeed. From a stylistic point of view which of your suggestions do you think is best and why? –  Doctor Jones May 21 '10 at 11:23
    
@DoctaJonez: I think I'd probably use the first form... but each of them is okay... and none of them is particularly nice :( –  Jon Skeet May 21 '10 at 11:46

try this:

int? nullableIntVal = (this.Policy == null) ? (int?) null : 1; 
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Maybe you could try :

default( int? );

instead of null

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int? i = (true ? new int?() : 1);

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This works: int? nullableIntVal = (this.Policy == null) ? null : (int?)1;.

Reason (copied from comment):

The error message is because the two branches of the ?: operator (null and 1) don't have a compatible type. The branches of the new solution (using null and (int?)1) do.

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an int will implicitally cast to int? - the OP is having problems assigning null to the int? –  David Neale May 21 '10 at 10:48
    
The error message is because the two branches of the ?: operator (null and 1) don't have a compatible type. The branches of the new solution (using null and (int?)1) do. –  Stephen Cleary May 21 '10 at 10:50
    
I don't think he wants it to be simply 1 –  KroaX May 21 '10 at 10:50
    
Stephen's answer is correct. The compiler error is raised because C# doesn't find types of null and 1 compatible. So by casting 1 to int? you make the whole expression compatible with int?. –  ssg May 21 '10 at 10:52
    
Oh there he already said it :) –  ssg May 21 '10 at 10:53

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