Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is there really any difference between using

If(this)
{
}
Else If(that)
{
}
Else
{
}

or using,

If(this)
{
}
If(that)
{
}
Else
{
}

? Does one execute any faster? Does the compiler or architecture make any difference?

share|improve this question
2  
this is basic programming question , you find answer in c book 4 chapter – Pranay Rana May 21 '10 at 11:34
1  
Have you tried running your code? – Johnsyweb May 21 '10 at 11:38
3  
"execute any faster" is the LAST thing you should be worrying about in deciding which construct to use. The #1 consideration is correctness - they do different things, as the many excellent answers below explain, so choose the one that gives the right answer. #2 is clarity: when there are two valid options, choose whichever is easier to read and understand. – David Gelhar May 21 '10 at 11:51
    
Suppose I said: "If the store carries Coke, buy me a Coke. If they carry Pepsi, buy me a Pepsi. If they carry Mountain Dew, buy me a Mountain Dew." Now suppose the store carries all three sodas. What should you buy? According to what I logically asked: all three. The word "else" makes a big difference. – Dan Tao May 21 '10 at 16:35
up vote 19 down vote accepted

There's the huge difference that the contents of the this-block and the that-block can both be executed in the second form, whereas the first form allows at most one of those to be executed.

Compare these two Python snippets:

x = 10

if x > 5:
    print "x larger than 5"
elif x > 1:
    print "x larger than 1"
else:
    print "x not larger than 1"

# output: x larger than 5

and

x = 10

if x > 5:
    print "x larger than 5"
if x > 1:  # not using else-if anymore!
    print "x larger than 1"
else:
    print "x not larger than 1"

# output line 1: x larger than 5
# output line 2: x larger than 1

As others have mentioned, you generally shouldn't be concerned about performance between these variations so much as you should be concerned about correctness. However, since you asked... all else being equal, the second form will be slower because the second conditional must be evaluated.

But unless you have determined that code written in this form is a bottleneck, it's not really worth your effort to even think about optimizing it. In switching from the first form to the second, you give up the jump out of the first if-statement and get back a forced evaluation of the second condition. Depending on the language, that's probably an extremely negligible difference.

share|improve this answer
    
Right, both will be observationally equivalent only is thisand that are mutually exclusive. As a side note, there might be a performance impact, due to how the compiler can generate code for both. For a language such as lisaac, where if blocks are compiled using dispatch tables if possible, using else if can lead to performance improvements. – tonio May 21 '10 at 11:30

Yes, in your first example, if this evaluates to true and that evaluates to true, only the first code block will be executed, whereas in the second example, they both will.

They are not equivalent

share|improve this answer

Yes.

In the First case: control-flow will only check the next condition if the current condition fails but in the second case it will check all conditions that come across.

In first case Else part will only be executed if all previous conditions fails to be true. and in the second case only if the last If condition fails.

share|improve this answer
    
In the second case, the Else statement could be evaluated if the first if is true and the second is false. – Thibault Falise May 21 '10 at 11:38
    
updated the answer. – this. __curious_geek May 21 '10 at 11:40

it makes a difference.

in case "this" and "that" are both true, both part of code will result something else.

share|improve this answer

In first code. it will check IF, if this is true then execute its body, if false then will check ELSEIF if that is true that execute its body, if false then will execute body of else.

Second code it will check IF, if this is true then execute its body, if false do nothing. check 2nd IF if that is true that execute its body, if false then will execute body of else.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.