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I have a WCF service and web client. Web service implements one method SubmitOrders. This method takes a collection of orders. The problem is that service must return an array of results for each order - true or false. Marking WCF paramters as out or ref makes no sense. What would you recommend?

[ServiceContact]
public bool SubmitOrders(OrdersInfo)

[DataContract]
public class OrdersInfo
{
  Order[] Orders;
}
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OK. This was just my lack of knowledge on WCF attributes. Thank you all for answers. –  Captain Comic May 21 '10 at 13:10
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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Marking WCF paramters as out or ref makes no sense.

out parameters do make sense in WCF.

What would you recommend?

I recommend to use out parameters.


Note 1: It will move your out parameter to be the first parameter on you.

Note 2: Yes you can return objects with complex types in WCF. Tag your class with an attribute of [DataContract] and your properties with an attribute of [DataMember].

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I agree, we've used them extensively in our own services. You could also mark the method as IsOneWay=False and pass back an array of whatever data you want to the caller rather than just a bool. –  Jacob Ewald May 21 '10 at 13:03
    
Err.. I see. I thought that WCF serializes the class into messages and the message is transfered to service. Out parameters assume some back message to client - am i right? –  Captain Comic May 21 '10 at 13:05
    
Just don't add the OneWayAttribute! The default is Request/Response. –  Erup May 21 '10 at 13:06
    
Why out parameter should move to the first place ? Now I get error and WCF auto moves out to the first place. Is it a rule of WCF ? Thx. –  kevin Dec 8 '11 at 10:39
    
I believe i can't use out parameters when using webHttpBinding. Can I? –  Muhammad Adeel Zahid Apr 13 '12 at 8:23
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Well, if you want to avoid out and ref parameters, you could always return an array of the IDs of the orders that were successfully submitted.

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1  
@Captain: I'm not sure about WCF specifically, but SOAP services can use "out" parameters. I would guess WCF supports that since it makes sense at least with SOAP and TCP/IP. –  Nelson Rothermel May 21 '10 at 13:05
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Use complex type(another class with DataContract attribute) in return.

Like

[ServiceContact]
public OrdersResult SubmitOrders(OrdersInfo)

[DataContract]
public class OrdersInfo
{
  Order[] Orders;
}

[DataContract]
public class OrdersResult
{
  .....
}

Also add DataMember on Order[] Orders;

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It's not needed to create another DataContract obj. Just pass as out parameter. –  Erup May 21 '10 at 13:07
    
Both solutions will work. It depends from designed whether he wants to have out param or return complex type. –  Incognito May 22 '10 at 11:24
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Yes, it makes sense returning an out parameter on WCF operations. On response, the SOAP message will contain the element passed back.

There are good content on MSDN about data transfer: Specifying Data Transfer in Service Contracts

Also, you need to use the OperationContractAttribute (not ServiceContractAttribute) on the SubmitOrders.

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Thank you. This is just a typo This was not copypaste, I just simplified the problem and typed code in a hurry. –  Captain Comic May 21 '10 at 13:08
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Special class that holds the order and the true/false, or an array of tupels.

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The method would look like:

public OrdersInfo SubmitOrders(OrderInfo orders){
}

where each item in the OrderInfo will have a SubmissionStatusInfo like:

class SubmissionStatusInfo{
 enum Status  { get; set; }
 string Message { get; set; }
}

where Status : Submitted, Failed, Error etc.
Message : a string giving some additional information about the status...

HTH

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You can perform FaultException<SubmissionStatusInfo>. It's a "best practice" on passing back an error. –  Erup May 21 '10 at 13:09
    
Yep, that makes more sense... –  Sunny May 21 '10 at 13:15
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