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I'm wondering how to declare JavaScript code within a CDATA section so that it is compatible with XHTML. Which method is correct/recommended?

Method 1:

<script type="text/javascript">
// <![CDATA[
CODE
// ]]>
</script>

Method 2:

<script type="text/javascript">
/* <![CDATA[ */
CODE
/* ]]> */
</script>

Is the second one also suitable for inline CSS?

And, is it possible/does it make sense to add some encoding declaration here like

<script type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8">
...
<style type="text/css" media="screen" charset="utf-8">
...

or

<script type="text/javascript">
@charset "utf-8";
...
<style type="text/css" media="screen">
@charset "utf-8";
...
share|improve this question
    
These XHTML examples on Wikipedia demonstrate how to incorporate inline JavaScript within a CDATA section. – DavidRR Sep 5 '14 at 12:22
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Which method is correct/recommended?

Either are equally good.

Is the second one also suitable for inline CSS?

Yes.

However, you only need to worry about putting script and style blocks in a <![CDATA[ section when you want to include the characters < or & in the block. You'll almost never use them in CSS.

You might use them in JavaScript, but it's generally better to avoid the issue by putting any significant amount of code in external scripts where it belongs. Inline script blocks tend to be better for putting data and script-invocation calls in, which rarely need to use < or & (except in string literal values, in which case there's an argument for encoding them to eg. \x3C instead).

And, is it possible/does it make sense to add some encoding declaration here

No. The charset="..." attribute only has any meaning for external files (and doesn't exist on <style> since that is never an external file). Internal content has already been decoded from bytes to characters at the same time as the rest of the containing document, so charset is meaningless by this point.

In any case, not all browsers pay any attention to the <script charset> attribute, so you have to make the encoding of scripts match the encoding of the page that includes them. Which makes charset="..." quite redundant.

@charset "utf-8"; is OK in external style sheets, but you almost never need non-ASCII characters in stylesheets so it's unusual to see it. @charset is not valid in JavaScript.

share|improve this answer
    
bobince, thanks for your detailed answer! So, I think I'll leave it to <script src="foo.js" type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8"> for external scripts (though "quite redundant") and add @charset "utf-8"; to my external style sheets. – joyce May 21 '10 at 19:54
    
BTW: Would YOU advise to use CDATA sections if XHTML is served as text/html(which I think is mandatory for the benefit of cross-browser compatibility)? – joyce May 21 '10 at 20:02

This depends on how you're serving your XHTML.

If you're serving your XHTML as XHTML, using the following HTTP header...

Content-Type:application/xhtml+xml

... then all you need is a CDATA section with the beginning and end commented out; just like you did.

However, if you are serving as HTML...

Content-Type:text/html

Things get a little more complicated. You should read the article Sending XHTML as text/html Considered Harmful but also form your own opinion on the matter; whether or not serving XHTML as text/html is really harmful is debated frequently; for example, Elliote Rusty Harold (author of the book Refactoring HTML which I highly recommend) disagrees.

share|improve this answer
    
I think I'm forced to serve XHTML as HTML using Content-Type:text/html because of older browsers like IE 5/5.5/6 that don't support X(HT)ML at all, right? So, is it still necessary/recommended then to make use of CDATA sections? – joyce May 21 '10 at 19:36
    
Yes, any version of IE will behave badly when you use application/xhtml+xml. As such, you're theoretically going against formal recommendation, and if you want to stay as close as possible to the ideal you'll want to use the techniques described by Ian Hickson. – Richard JP Le Guen May 21 '10 at 21:04
1  
Shame on IE and thanks a bunch for advising me, Richard! – joyce May 21 '10 at 23:06

I'm used to use this and never get trouble:

<script type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8">
...
</script
<style type="text/css" media="screen" charset="utf-8">
...
</style>
share|improve this answer
    
That's not XHTML compliant, though. Chances are you have a character that doesn't fit the XML requirements, which is why you need to include <![CDATA[ ... ]]> around it. – Jeff Rupert May 21 '10 at 19:52

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