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I was trying to write a simple array flatten method, but it does not work using instance variable. It works only using class variables. Can anyone tell me why? and how to make it work using instance variables.

 class Array
 @y = []
  def flatten_array
   self.each do |x|
    if x.class.to_s != 'Array'
    @y <<  x
     else
     x.flatten_array
    end
   end 
   return @y  
  end  
 end


 a =  [1,2,3,4,5]
 b =  [6,7,8]
 c =  [9,10]
 a1 = [12,13,a,b,c]
 puts a1.inspect
 b1 = a1.flatten_array
 puts b1.inspect
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Just curious: what are you trying to accomplish? There is already a Array#flatten, you know... –  Marc-André Lafortune May 21 '10 at 19:13
    
Why do you want to use an instance variable instead of a local variable? –  Kathy Van Stone May 21 '10 at 19:29
    
There's a typo for "Instance" in the title. –  Andrew Grimm May 23 '10 at 23:37

2 Answers 2

The reason why it doesn't work for instance variables is that x.flatten_array is using a new @y, not the one you were accumulating. Using an instance or class variable this way, however, is not good practice as it is effectively using a global variable for a local function.

The standard procedure for writing a recursive function that needs extra variables is to use a helper function:

def flatten_array
  int_flatten(self, [])
end

private 
def int_flatten(a, result)
  a.each do |elem|
    if (elem.is_a? Array)
      int_flatten(elem, result)
    else
      result << elem
    end
  end
  return result
end

or just be willing to use concatenation:

def flatten_array
  result = []
  each do |elem|
    if (elem.is_a? Array)
      result += elem.flatten_array
    else
      result << elem
    end
  end
  return result
end
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to: Marc-André Lafortune I just wanted to write my own array_flatten to understand Ruby better. to: Andrew Grimm Thanks for pointing out the typo in heading. However, that did not answer my question. Kathy, Thanks for the reply.I was thinking that local variable may not work, but apparently I was wrong. I tried both your code snippets. The second worked and first did not. Please see below. –  Nick May 24 '10 at 16:44
    
Snippet1: class Array def flatten_array int_flatten(self, []) end private def int_flatten(a, result) a.each do |elem| if (elem.is_a? Array) int_flatten(elem, result) else result << elem end end end end a = [1,2,3,[4,5,6,[7,8,9]]] b = a.flatten_array puts b.inspect output: [1, 2, 3, [4, 5, 6, [7, 8, 9]]] –  Nick May 24 '10 at 16:46
    
Snippet2: class Array def flatten_array result = [] each do |elem| if (elem.is_a? Array) result += elem.flatten_array else result << elem end end return result end end a = [1,2,3,[4,5,6,[7,8,9]]] b = a.flatten_array puts b.inspect output:[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9] –  Nick May 24 '10 at 16:48
    
Any idea what wrong with first one? –  Nick May 24 '10 at 16:49
    
Kathy, you missed the return result in the first one. It works after putting in the return.. class Array def flatten_array result = int_flatten(self, []) return result end private def int_flatten(a, result) a.each do |elem| if (elem.is_a? Array) int_flatten(elem, result) else result << elem end return result end end end a = [1,2,3,[4,5,6,[7,8,9]]] b = a.flatten_array puts b.inspect output: [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9] –  Nick May 24 '10 at 17:01

Use native Array#flatten

a =  [1,2,3,4,5]
b =  [6,7,8]
c =  [9,10]
a1 = [12,13,a,b,c]

puts a1.inspect
#=> [12, 13, [1, 2, 3, 4, 5], [6, 7, 8], [9, 10]]

puts a1.flatten.inspect
#=> [12, 13, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
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