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I'm having troubles optimizing this Levenshtein Distance calculation I'm doing. I need to do the following:

  1. Get the record with the minimum distance for the source string as well as a trimmed version of the source string

  2. Pick the record with the minimum distance
  3. If the min distances are equal (original vs trimmed), choose the trimmed one with the lowest distance
  4. If there are still multiple records that fall under the above two categories, pick the one with the highest frequency

Here's my working version:

DECLARE @Results TABLE
(
    ID int,
    [Name] nvarchar(200), 
    Distance int, 
    Frequency int, 
    Trimmed bit
)


INSERT INTO @Results
    SELECT ID, 
           [Name], 
           (dbo.Levenshtein(@Source, [Name])) As Distance,
           Frequency, 
           'False' As Trimmed
    FROM
           MyTable

INSERT INTO @Results
    SELECT ID, 
           [Name], 
           (dbo.Levenshtein(@SourceTrimmed, [Name])) As Distance,
           Frequency, 
           'True' As Trimmed
    FROM
           MyTable

SET @ResultID = (SELECT TOP 1 ID FROM @Results ORDER BY Distance, Trimmed, Frequency)
SET @Result = (SELECT TOP 1 [Name] FROM @Results ORDER BY Distance, Trimmed, Frequency)
SET @ResultDist = (SELECT TOP 1 Distance FROM @Results ORDER BY Distance, Trimmed, Frequency)
SET @ResultTrimmed = (SELECT TOP 1 Trimmed FROM @Results ORDER BY Distance, Trimmed, Frequency)

I believe what I need to do here is to..

  1. Not dumb the results to a temporary table
  2. Do only 1 select from `MyTable`
  3. Setting the results right in the select from the initial select statement. (Since select will set variables and you can set multiple variables in one select statement)

I know there has to be a good implementation to this but I can't figure it out... this is as far as I got:

SELECT top 1 @ResultID = ID, 
             @Result = [Name], 
            (dbo.Levenshtein(@Source, [Name])) As distOrig,
             (dbo.Levenshtein(@SourceTrimmed, [Name])) As distTrimmed,
             Frequency
FROM
    MyTable
WHERE /* ... yeah I'm lost */
ORDER BY distOrig, distTrimmed, Frequency 

Any ideas?

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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think your attempt differs from the code that you say works in that the working code orders by distance first, whether or not that is original or trimmed distance. Your attempt orders by original distance first, then trimmed.

I'm not sure I understand what you're trying to do entirely, but does the following do what you need?

SELECT TOP 1
    @ResultId = ID,
    @Result = [Name],
    @ResultDist = distOrig,
    @ResultTrimmed = distTrimmed
FROM (
    SELECT
        ID, [Name], 
        dbo.Levenshtein(@Source, [Name]) As distOrig,
        dbo.Levenshtein(@SourceTrimmed, [Name])) As distTrimmed,
        Frequency
    FROM MyTable
) AS T
ORDER BY
    CASE WHEN distOrig > distTrimmed THEN distOrig ELSE distTrimmed END, -- Distance
    CASE WHEN distOrig > distTrimmed THEN 1 ELSE 0 END,                  -- Trimmed
    Frequency                                                            -- Frequency
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, Worked great! Cut the time from over an hour to 8 minutes. Unfortunately it's a 700000 record table and although it's much much faster, running your SQL on that takes 8 minutes... I need it to be within a minute, at this point I'm not even sure if that's possible. Any more ideas on how to refine it futher? –  Matt May 22 '10 at 5:28
    
If @Source is often equal to @SourceTrimmed, then you can avoid calling dbo.Levenshtein() twice. I'd run "SELECT dbo.Levenshtein(@Source, [Name]) FROM MyTable", and see how long that takes alone as a starting point. Failing that there may be a way of running the query just on rows that are likely to be near the top of the ORDER BY with some pre-processing –  Paul May 22 '10 at 13:48
    
Yes I realized I should always be using @Source so that cut it down to 1 select which cut down the process time in half. Working on the second part now... –  Matt May 22 '10 at 21:39
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