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Performance wise, is there really a big difference between using:

  • ArrayList.contains(o) vs foreach|iterator
  • LinkedList.contains(o) vs foreach|iterator

Of course, for the foreach|iterator loops, I'll have to explicitly compare the methods and return true or false accordingly.

The object I'm comparing is an object where equals() and hashcode() are both properly overridden.

EDIT: Don't need to know about containsValue after all, sorry about that. And yes, I'm stupid... I realized how stupid my question was about containsKey vs foreach, nevermind about that, I don't know what I was thinking. I basically want to know about the ones above (edited out the others).

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No worries - it's a more interesting question this way. :) –  CPerkins May 21 '10 at 22:30
1  
Another reason to use .contains(o) vs. a loop is that, as seen in the answers, how you loop is dependent on the Collection type while contains() works for any Collection. You don't care if it's an ArrayList or a LinkedList, or even a List at all; however you're still stuck with the .containsKey(k) or containsValue(v) dichotomy with Maps. –  Stephen P May 21 '10 at 22:34
2  
For LinkedList, contains is about twice as fast as for-each (see stackoverflow.com/questions/2804250/…) –  polygenelubricants May 22 '10 at 1:50

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

EDITED:

With the new form of the question no longer including HashMap and TreeMap, my answer is entirely different. I now say no.

I'm sure that other people have answered this, but in both LinkedList and ArrayList, contains() just calls indexOf(), which iterates over the collection.

It's possible that there are tiny performance differences, both between LinkedList and ArrayList, and between contains and foreach, there aren't any big differences.

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HashMap and TreeMap are not lists, besides that you could iterate over values or keys –  stacker May 21 '10 at 22:14
    
@stacker, the OP has edited the question so that it no longer refers to HashMap or TreeMap (which the original did). I'm going to edit my answer to be relevant to the current form of the question when I get home. –  CPerkins May 21 '10 at 22:20
    
sorry modified OP, this happens sometimes –  stacker May 21 '10 at 22:24
    
@stacker Yup, it happens. No worries. –  CPerkins May 21 '10 at 22:31

This makes no differency since contains(o) calls indexOf(o) which simply loops like this:

for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    if (o.equals(elementData[i]))
       return i;

(Checked in ArrayList)

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Also true in LinkedList. –  CPerkins May 21 '10 at 22:27
2  
+1 Well, the difference is that contains() work, while I once in a while see programmers getting simple loops wrong (the classic off-by-1 error ;-)). –  helpermethod May 21 '10 at 22:28
2  
@Helper good point. OP's question was about performance, but it's worth underlining the value of clarity. –  CPerkins May 21 '10 at 22:30

ArrayList.contains does

return indexOf(o) >= 0;

where

public int indexOf(Object o) {
if (o == null) {
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    if (elementData[i]==null)
        return i;
} else {
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    if (o.equals(elementData[i]))
        return i;
}
return -1;
}

It's similar for LinkedList, only it uses .next() to iterate through the elements, so not much difference there.

public int indexOf(Object o) {
    int index = 0;
    if (o==null) {
        for (Entry e = header.next; e != header; e = e.next) {
            if (e.element==null)
                return index;
            index++;
        }
    } else {
        for (Entry e = header.next; e != header; e = e.next) {
            if (o.equals(e.element))
                return index;
            index++;
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

HashMap.containKey uses the hash of the key to fetch all keys with that hash (which is fast) and then uses equals only on those keys, so there's an improvement there; but containsValue() goes through the values with a for.

TreeMap.containsKey seem to do an informed search using a comparator to find the Key faster, so still better; but containsValue still seems to go through the entire three until it finds a value.

Overall I think you should use the methods, since they're easier to write than doing a loop every time :).

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Without benchmarking, contains should be faster or the same in all cases.

For 1 and 2, it doesn't need to call the iterator methods. It can loop internally. Both ArrayList and LinkedList implement contains in terms of indexOf

  1. ArrayList - indexOf is a C-style for loop on the backing array.
  2. LinkedList - indexOf walks the linked list in a C-style for loop.

For 3 and 4, you have to distinguish between containsKey and containsValue.

3. HashMap, containsKey is O(1). It works by hashing the key, getting the associated bucket, then walking the linked list. containsValue is O(n) and works by simply checking every value in every bucket in a nested for loop.

4. TreeMap, containsKey is O(log n). It checks whether it's in range, then searches the red-black tree. containsValue, which is O(n), uses an in-order walk of the tree.

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What makes it faster? I tried to look at the code to see how contains() was implemented but Netbeans "navigate to source" option only shows me the interface and not the actual implementation... I though contains() would work somewhat like a loop and calling equals but I decided to ask... –  Ricardo Amaral May 21 '10 at 21:58
    
It doesn't have to initialize an Iterator instance, since it already has access to the values inside. And yes, that's exactly how it works (see my answer). (Well, actually for ArrayList you can use an int counter, and l.get(i) which just gets the value at index i from the array, so not much overhead if you do it like that). –  Andrei Fierbinteanu May 21 '10 at 22:19

I think using contains is better because generally the library implementation is more efficient than manual implementation of the same. Check out if you can during object construction or afterwards pass a comparator method that you have written which takes care of your custom equals and hashcode implementation.

Thanks, Krishna

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Traversing the container with foreach/iterator is always O(n) time. ArrayList/LinkedList search is O(n) as well.

HashMap.containsKey() is O(1) amortized time.

TreeMap.containsKey() is O(log n) time.

For both HashMap and TreeMap containsValue() is O(n), but there may be implementations optimized for containsValue() be as fast as containsKey().

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