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How would the infix and stack priorities be extended to include the operators <, >, <=, >=, ==, !=, !, &&, and ||?

When parsing an infix expression, for example: P + (Q – F) / Y#, each symbol has a priority which is relevant to their order of operation. / and * have a higher priority than + and -.

Here are the priorities I have/understand:

Priority * / + - ( )   #

Infix    2 2 1 1 3 0   0 

Stack    2 2 1 1 0 n/a 0
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This sounds like a homework question quoted verbatim... –  Erik Forbes Nov 13 '08 at 23:41

2 Answers 2

That depends on what priorities you want, right? Unless you are asking about the priorities in a specific language (if so, elaborate).

Anyway, <, >, <= and >= do not apply to booleans, == and != apply to anything, and !, && and || apply solely to booleans. But they ALL return booleans, so you want to apply those which do not apply to booleans first, those which might apply to booleans next, and finally those which only apply to booleans. As for the last, ! has precedence over && and ||. Though not necessary, I'd make && have precedence over ||, because some logic notations work that way.

So the precedence would wind up being:

(
* /
+ -
< > <= >=
== !=
!
&&
||
) #
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I think it's a little misleading to put the ) at the bottom –  Mooing Duck Jun 4 at 22:00

Found: Operator Precedence in Java & Infix operators

But why?

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I still don't understand your question. And yes, I know what operator priorities are, and I know about stacks, and I know about infix (and postfix, and prefix), and I know how to translate between them. And I teach the compiler course. But I don't understand what your question is. –  Thomas Padron-McCarthy Nov 14 '08 at 11:36

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