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I know what Java Double.NaN is. I have some Java code that produces NaN.

// calculate errors
delta = m1 + m2 - M;
eta = f1 + f2 - F;
for (int i = 0; i < numChildren; i++) {
  epsilon[i] = p[i]*m1+(1-p[i])*m2+q[i]*f1+(1-q[i])*f2-C[i];
}

// use errors in gradient descent
// set aside differences for the p's and q's
float mDiff = m1 - m2;
float fDiff = f1 - f2;
// first update m's and f's
m1 -= rate*delta;
m2 -= rate*delta;
f1 -= rate*eta;
f2 -= rate*eta;
for (int i = 0; i < numChildren; i++) {
  m1 -= rate*epsilon[i]*p[i];
  m2 -= rate*epsilon[i]*(1-p[i]);
  f1 -= rate*epsilon[i]*q[i];
  f2 -= rate*epsilon[i]*(1-q[i]);
}
// now update the p's and q's
for (int i = 0; i < numChildren; i++) {
  p[i] -= rate*epsilon[i]*mDiff;
  q[i] -= rate*epsilon[i]*fDiff;  
}

Under what circumstances will Java produce a NaN value?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Given what I know about gradient descent, you are most probably jumping out to infinity because you do not have adaptive rate (i.e. your rate is too big).

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You are completely correct. I trimmed the rate and now it is well behaved -- color me embarrassed to not think of the obvious thing first. –  Brent May 22 '10 at 6:46

NaN is triggered by the following occurrences:

  • results that are complex values
    • √x where x is negative
    • log(x) where x is negative
    • tan(x) where x mod 180 is 90
    • asin(x) or acos(x) where x is outside [-1..1]
  • 0/0
  • ∞/∞
  • ∞/−∞
  • −∞/∞
  • −∞/−∞
  • 0×∞
  • 0×−∞
  • 1
  • ∞ + (−∞)
  • (−∞) + ∞

Sorry for such a general answer, but I hope that helped.

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1  
Well, from this list I can clearly deduce it must be one of the ones involving addition or multiplications, so I guess it boils down to hunting for where something overflows. –  Brent May 22 '10 at 6:35
    
For those curious, like me, why is 1^∞ there: mathforum.org/library/drmath/view/56006.html –  Oak May 22 '10 at 6:51

According to Wikipedia:

There are three kinds of operation which return NaN:

  • Operations with a NaN as at least one operand
  • Indeterminate forms
    • The divisions 0/0, ∞/∞, ∞/−∞, −∞/∞, and −∞/−∞
    • The multiplications 0×∞ and 0×−∞
    • The power 1
    • The additions ∞ + (−∞), (−∞) + ∞ and equivalent subtractions.
  • Real operations with complex results:
    • The square root of a negative number
    • The logarithm of a negative number
    • The tangent of an odd multiple of 90 degrees (or π/2 radians)
    • The inverse sine or cosine of a number which is less than −1 or greater than +1.

This Java snippet illustrates all of the above, except the tangent one (I suspect because of limited precision of double):

import java.util.*;
import static java.lang.Double.NaN;
import static java.lang.Double.POSITIVE_INFINITY;
import static java.lang.Double.NEGATIVE_INFINITY;

public class NaN {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        double[] allNaNs = {
            0D/0D,
            POSITIVE_INFINITY / POSITIVE_INFINITY,
            POSITIVE_INFINITY / NEGATIVE_INFINITY,
            NEGATIVE_INFINITY / POSITIVE_INFINITY,
            NEGATIVE_INFINITY / NEGATIVE_INFINITY,
            0 * POSITIVE_INFINITY,
            0 * NEGATIVE_INFINITY,
            Math.pow(1, POSITIVE_INFINITY),
            POSITIVE_INFINITY + NEGATIVE_INFINITY,
            NEGATIVE_INFINITY + POSITIVE_INFINITY,
            POSITIVE_INFINITY - POSITIVE_INFINITY,
            NEGATIVE_INFINITY - NEGATIVE_INFINITY,
            Math.sqrt(-1),
            Math.log(-1),
            Math.asin(-2),
            Math.acos(+2),
        };
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(allNaNs));
        // prints "[NaN, NaN...]"
        System.out.println(NaN == NaN); // prints "false"
        System.out.println(Double.isNaN(NaN)); // prints "true"
    }
}

References

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Have you tried sprinkling your code with System.out.println statements to determine exactly where NaNs start occuring?

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I had done many, but not everything. I've done everything now and it seems to be that the gradient can push everything off to infinity, so I'll probably have to add some ad-hoc method to push it back. –  Brent May 22 '10 at 6:43

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