Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
    function get_ibo_id() {
    if($registerquery = $this->conn->query("SELECT ibo_id FROM fasttrack WHERE count <    
                   8 && flag = 1 ")){
    $this->increase_count();
    while ($row = $registerquery->fetch_assoc()) { 
           return $row[ibo_id];
        }
    }
    else return "No id";
}

it always enters the if block even if the condition is not satisfied... going crazy

share|improve this question
1  
What is your $this->conn->query method and what does it return? – Gumbo May 22 '10 at 8:13
    
And please explain (in your own words, not code) exactly what these ten lines of code are supposed to do. – VolkerK May 22 '10 at 8:17
    
I just voted up the answer that satisfies my question and clicked the monochrome check icon. I hope I did it right.. Thanks everyone for the answers! – Joann May 22 '10 at 8:29
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well $registerquery will never return false, even if you condition is not met...

in if statements you have to get a variable to return true or false...

What I would do is something like this (you will have to adept it to your OOP code):

function get_ibo_id() {

$registerquery = $this->conn->query("SELECT ibo_id FROM fasttrack WHERE count < 8 && flag = 1 ");
if (mysql_num_rows($registerquery) > 0) {
$this->increase_count();
    while ($row = $registerquery->fetch_assoc()) { 
           return $row[ibo_id];
        }
    }
    else return "No id";
}

It makes a query,checks if you get more than 0 results back and does what is has to do, otherwise echo's an error...

Ladislav

share|improve this answer
    
PHP is not a strong typed language (see the type comparison table php.net/manual/en/types.comparisons.php for what values evaluate to true). – Gumbo May 22 '10 at 8:21
1  
That (counting the records in the result set, or simply check if there is a record that meets the conditions) is probably the right direction. But since $registerquery is obviously supposed to be an object it can't be passed to mysql_num_rows(). And it doesn't necessarily have to be MySQL. – VolkerK May 22 '10 at 8:22
    
I know, but that is why I said at the top that he will have to adopt it to his own OOP code, since I do not know what kind of Object we are dealing with... – Ladislav May 22 '10 at 8:30
    
I just want to be nit-picky ;-) E.g.: the return statement indicates that both num_rows() and the while loop are superfluous. – VolkerK May 22 '10 at 8:50

I think the problem is that

$this->conn->query(...)
is not returning FALSE as you might expect.
If your query produces an empty result set the mysql_query still returns a resource, not FALSE. You should check the count of returned rows using
mysql_num_rows($registerquery)

share|improve this answer
    
Again: Probably the right direction but the OP didn't mention mysql_query() and $registerquery->fetch_assoc() indicates that $registerquery is an object, not a mysql result resource. – VolkerK May 22 '10 at 8:27
    
True :-) I just wanted to point out the problem with the usage return value. – garph0 May 22 '10 at 8:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.