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Given registered services:

builder.RegisterType<Foo1>().Named<IFoo>("one").As<IFoo>();
builder.RegisterType<Foo2>().Named<IFoo>("two").As<IFoo>();
builder.RegisterType<Foo3>().Named<IFoo>("three").As<IFoo>();

Can I retrieve named implementations of IFoo interface by injecting something like Func<string, IFoo> ?

public class SomeClass(Func<string, IFoo> foo) {
    var f = foo("one");
    Debug.Assert(f is Foo1);

    var g = foo("two");
    Debug.Assert(g is Foo2);

    var h = foo("three");
    Debug.Assert(h is Foo3);
}

I know I can do it with Meta<>, but I don't want to use it.

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1 Answer

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You could register your own resolving delegate like this:

builder.Register<Func<string, IFoo>>(c =>
    {
        var cc = c.Resolve<IComponentContext>();
        return named => cc.Resolve<IFoo>(named);
    });
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Great idea! Thanks :). –  ppiotrowicz May 22 '10 at 17:34
1  
Minor edit - the 'c' parameter is a temporary; you need to resolve IComponentContext if you want to hang onto it like this. c => { var cc = c.Resolve<IComponentContext>(); return named => cc.Resolve<IFoo>(named); } –  Nicholas Blumhardt May 28 '10 at 22:44
    
@Nicholas: ah, of course, this is too easy to overlook :) –  Peter Lillevold May 28 '10 at 23:57
    
Agreed - I'd like to find a way to make this easier to catch. –  Nicholas Blumhardt May 30 '10 at 23:04
1  
@user137348 - as Nicholas mentions, the 'c' context is a temporary context instance. If you "store" that context in the lambda we're registering the lambda will not work as expected. By resolving 'IComponentContext' we'll get a "real" context that can be passed around. –  Peter Lillevold Oct 4 '10 at 13:58
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