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I'm not sure if this is the right place to post this, but the problem actually belongs to a programming assignment. This recursion is something I probably should know how to solve but Im having a bit of trouble with it.

Solve the recursion:

T(0) = 2;
T(n) = T(n-1) + 2;

Solution:

T(n) = 2(n+1)

Could someone please show me how they got to that solution?

Please not that its not the main part of the assignment to solve this particular problem.

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7 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd solve it as follows:

Assume that T(n) = a*n + b for some a and b.
T(0) = 2. So a * 0 + b = 2, thus b = 2.

T(n) = T(n-1) + 2, so 
a * n + b = (a * (n-1) + b) + 2 consequently
a * n + b = a * n - a + b + 2 and
0 = - a + 2, thus a = 2.

So we have T(n) = 2 * n + 2 = 2 (n+1).
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You have to figure out what is solution and then you can use induction, to prove it.

To figure solution is simple.

Value is previous value + 2.

2, 2+2, 2+2+2, 2+2+2+2, 2+2+2+2+2, ...

Use induction to prove:

T(0) = 2
T(n) = T(n-1) + 2;

Solution
T(n) = 2(n+1)

Proof:
T(n) = T(n-1) + 2 => 2((n-1)+1) + 2 = 2(n+1)

Check for n=0
2(0+1)=2

End of proof
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The question was "how do you get to this solution", not "how do I prove this solution is true". –  A. Levy May 22 '10 at 18:17
    
O, I should probably put more attention on how to figure out connection between 2,2+2,2+2+2,.. and multiplication. –  Luka Rahne May 22 '10 at 20:17
4  
The proof is the way to get the solution. –  GregS May 22 '10 at 21:50
    
I'm amazed that induction isn't the accepted answer: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematical_induction –  job May 24 '10 at 18:39
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Try writing out the first few values - it should then be obvious.

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1  
+1 Does no-one bench test anymore? –  amelvin May 22 '10 at 17:31
4  
Unfortunately "Look at it, duh!" is rarely an appropriate proof in serious papers. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 22 '10 at 17:34
2  
@Ignacio: true, but once you have the series in front of you, with actual numbers plugged in, it becomes much easier to formulate a proof (IMNVHO, at least) –  Paul R May 22 '10 at 17:37
1  
I agree with Paul R, the poster did not ask for a proof but for a way to get the generating function. A proof could be done with e.g. mathematical induction. –  sebastiangeiger May 22 '10 at 17:45
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Take T(5):

T(5)
  |
  +-> T(4) + 2
        |
        +-> T(3) + 2
              |
              +-> T(2) + 2 
                    |
                    +-> T(1) + 2
                          |
                          +-> T(0) + 2
                                |
                                +-> 2

Now count the number of 2's that are added together for T(5).

Then try to figure out how many 2's would be added for T(n).

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It's an arithmetic progression with ratio common difference 2.

The first term is T[0] = 2 and the ratio common difference is r = 2 so the n + 1th term (n + 1th because there are n + 1 numbers in 0, 1, 2, ..., n) is T[0] + r*(n + 1 - 1) = 2 + 2*n = 2*(n + 1).

No guessing required, just recognize it as an arithmetic progression.

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changed ratio to common difference as ratio is used for geometric progressions, not arithmetic progressions. –  Aryabhatta May 22 '10 at 18:48
    
I am amazed you're the only one naming this progression for what it is... if it had begun at T(6) a number of people would have clueless it seems. –  Matthieu M. May 24 '10 at 13:02
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Each time n decreases by one, 2 is added. This gives a variable term of 2n. Since T(0) is fixed at 2, this gives a constant term of 2. Adding them together gives 2n + 2, or 2(n + 1).

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s/decreases/increases/ ? –  Paul R May 22 '10 at 17:29
1  
It decreases in the recursion. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 22 '10 at 17:31
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This one is pretty straightforward to solve by hand as the other answers point out, but in case it's ever useful, Mathematica is pretty good solving recurrence relations like this.

Evaluating

RSolve[{T[0] == 2, T[n] == T[n-1] + 2}, T[n], n]

returns

{{T[n] -> 2 (1 + n)}}

It can, for example, find the closed form of the nth Fibonacci number as well:

RSolve[{F[1] == 1, F[2] == 1, F[n] == F[n-1] + F[n-2]}, F[n], n] //FunctionExpand

returns

{{F[n] -> (((1 + Sqrt[5])/2)^n - (2/(1 + Sqrt[5]))^n*Cos[n*Pi])/Sqrt[5]}}
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