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In C++ given an array like this:

unsigned char bogus1[] = {
  0x2e, 0x2e, 0x2e, 0x2e
};

Is there a way to introspect bogus1 to find out is is four characters long?

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1  
possible duplicate of finding size of int array –  Georg Fritzsche May 22 '10 at 18:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Sure:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
  unsigned char bogus1[] = {
    0x2e, 0x2e, 0x2e, 0x2e
  };

  std::cout << sizeof(bogus1) << std::endl;

  return 0;
}

emits 4. More generally, sizeof(thearray)/sizeof(thearray[0]) is the number of items in the array. However, this is a compile-time operation and can only be used where the compiler knows about that "number of items" (not, for example, in a function receiving the array as an argument). For more generality, you can use std::vector instead of a bare array.

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"a function receiving the array as an argument" - careful, that needs to be a reference argument. Naming an array type directly in an argument declaration causes decay to pointer type, which causes the sizeof quotient to have undesired, implementation-defined behavior. –  Potatoswatter May 22 '10 at 18:28
    
So, if I do "std::clog << bogus1;" why can't std::clog detect the array is only four characters long and not walk off the end of the array looking for a NULL char? –  WilliamKF May 22 '10 at 18:39
    
WilliamKF: because that's pointless: you should just use std::string instead. The rare cases when you know the length of a string at compiletime are not worth the added complexity that you propose. –  Stefan Monov May 22 '10 at 18:47
    
@WilliamKF, std::clog << ... is an example of "a function receiving the array as an argument" (by reference, as potatoswatter mentions -- specifically a const referece in this case) -- the function in question, in this case, is operator<<(std::ostream&, const char[]&). As I mentioned, it can't "introspect" the size of its argument. Stefan is correct that you should use std::string for this kind of things (I mentioned std::vector as a more general approach, esp. when the items aren't chars;-). –  Alex Martelli May 22 '10 at 19:05
    
@Alex, is that so? I believe that the array is decayed into a pointer to the first element and the actual matched signature is: operator<<( std::ostream&, const char* ) if the function took the array by reference (constant or not) it would have to be templated in the argument array size and there would have to be a different function for dynamically allocated c-strings. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 23 '10 at 1:52

One thing to be careful about with sizeof is making sure you don't accidentally do the sizeof an array that has decayed into a pointer:

void bad(int a[10])
{
    cout << (sizeof(a) / sizeof(a[0])) << endl;
}

int main()
{
    int a[10];
    cout << (sizeof(a) / sizeof(a[0])) << endl;
    bad(a);
}

On my 64 bit machine, this outputs:

10
2

The size computed inside bad is incorrect because a will have decayed to a pointer. In general, don't trust the sizeof an array that was passed as a function argument.

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int bogus1_size = sizeof(bogus1) / sizeof(unsigned char);
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1  
I'd recommend writing that as sizeof(bogus1) / sizeof(bogus1[0]); that way there is no chance that you accidentally have a different types between in the definition of bogus1 and your size computation. –  R Samuel Klatchko May 22 '10 at 18:34

This gets around the pointer decay problem:

#include <cstddef>

template<typename T, std::size_t N>
std::size_t array_size(T(&)[N]) { return N; }

In that it will not compile unless the array size is known.

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Yes, it seems by template usage the std::stringstream could learn of the array length and not run off the end. –  WilliamKF May 22 '10 at 21:12
    
@William: Possibly, but then it would almost certainly ignore any null terminators, which is unexpected when printing strings. –  Dennis Zickefoose May 22 '10 at 22:07

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