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I looked through ApplicationListener, and they don't have it in there. On a Mac, it's when that application has the equivalent of focus; its menu is in the top menu bar.

Also, if you know this, could you tell me how my application can request to de-focus itself?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Implementations of windowActivated() and windowDeactivated() in WindowListener or WindowAdapter will tell you when a window is activated or deactivated. You don't need ApplicationListener for that.

Addendum: Although not required in this case, a transparent implementation of the additional functionality specified in ApplicationListener may be found in this example.

Addendum: See also How to Write Window Listeners.

Addendum: I think I see what you mean. In the example OSXAdapter, which uses -Dapple.laf.useScreenMenuBar=true, the menus disappear when the last window (HIDE_ON_CLOSE by default) closes. It's less than optimal, but the About… and Preferences menus remain in the application menu; choosing either restores the screen menu. Another possibility is to modify the dock menu in com.apple.eawt.Application.

import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.GridLayout;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import java.awt.event.WindowEvent;
import java.awt.event.WindowFocusListener;
import java.awt.event.WindowListener;
import java.awt.event.WindowStateListener;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;

public class WindowTest extends JFrame implements ActionListener,
    WindowListener, WindowFocusListener, WindowStateListener {

    public static final void main(String args[]) throws Exception {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                new WindowTest("One");
                new WindowTest("Two");
            }
        });
    }

    public WindowTest(String name) {
        super(name);
        this.setName(name);
        this.setLayout(new GridLayout(0, 1));
        createButton("Back");
        createButton("Front");
        createButton("Hide");
        this.addWindowListener(this);
        this.addWindowFocusListener(this);
        this.addWindowStateListener(this);
        this.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        this.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
        this.pack();
        this.setVisible(true);
    }

    private void createButton(String name) {
        JButton b = new JButton(name);
        this.add(b);
        b.addActionListener(this);
    }

    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        String s = e.getActionCommand();
        if ("Back".equals(s)) {
            this.toBack();
        } else if ("Front".equals(s)) {
            this.toFront();
        } else {
            this.setExtendedState(JFrame.ICONIFIED);
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void windowOpened(WindowEvent e) {
        System.out.println(e);
    }

    @Override
    public void windowClosing(WindowEvent e) {
        System.out.println(e);
    }

    @Override
    public void windowClosed(WindowEvent e) {
        System.out.println(e);
    }

    @Override
    public void windowIconified(WindowEvent e) {
        System.out.println(e);
    }

    @Override
    public void windowDeiconified(WindowEvent e) {
        System.out.println(e);
    }

    @Override
    public void windowActivated(WindowEvent e) {
        System.out.println(e);
    }

    @Override
    public void windowDeactivated(WindowEvent e) {
        System.out.println(e);
    }

    @Override
    public void windowGainedFocus(WindowEvent e) {
        System.out.println(e);
    }

    @Override
    public void windowLostFocus(WindowEvent e) {
        System.out.println(e);
    }

    @Override
    public void windowStateChanged(WindowEvent e) {
        System.out.println(e);
    }

}
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The problem is, I hid my window by using frame.setVisible(false), which hides the window, but does not function like a Mac's 'hide' option. It hides the frame, however the application retains focus. Using frame.toBack() didn't work either; the application retained focus, just the window was moved to the back. On a mac, when you hide an application, the application hides all of its windows and defocuses, and unhides them all when you give the application focus. However, with frame.setVisible(), even when you defocus the application and give it focus back, it doesn't reappear. –  user263078 May 25 '10 at 21:47
    
(Continued) They're completely different methods, setVisible() and a Mac's hide function. The problem is, I already use a WindowListener, but the window doesn't reappear when I give it focus, so it doesn't work. You see my big problems, here? I've tried these. Do you have any other suggestions? I know you probably don't have experience with Macs, but you've been very helpful in the past. –  user263078 May 25 '10 at 21:49
    
@Stuart: toBack() makes no promises about focus. AFAIK, switching applications is the user's purview. The example above shows Window events for two windows, but you might explore the tutorial, too. –  trashgod May 26 '10 at 3:10
    
I already use OSXAdapter, but it is inadequate. I cannot manage or detect application focus at all, among other things. I wish I could find a way to do this... –  user263078 May 27 '10 at 14:55
    
I'm nonplussed. OSXAdapter seems irrelevant to this problem, and the example doesn't use it. I'm seeing WINDOW_LOST_FOCUS & WINDOW_GAINED_FOCUS events on the frontmost window as I alt-tab between applications or alt-~ between the example windows. –  trashgod May 27 '10 at 15:22
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could you tell me how my application can request to de-focus itself?

You can try:

frame.toBack();

If that doesn't work then you can iconify your application in which case focus should go to the previous application.

frame.setExtendedState(...);
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For reference, both work as expected on Mac OS X. –  trashgod May 23 '10 at 0:12
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The Java programming language is platform-independent. Rather than reading Apple's reference documentation, you should be using the official Java API Reference Documentation. There you will find documentation for JFrame, WindowListener, and WindowAdapter. You can register a WindowListener on a JFrame, using the addWindowListener function. The window listener may be used to intercept and handle a variety of window-related events including activated/deactived (which window is on top) or gained focus/ lost focus (which window will receive keyboard events). If you are supplying your own WindowListener and don't want to implement every single function, WindowAdapter is useful for that purpose as it implements WindowListener but provides empty definitions for each function. As for defocusing (in the sense that you mean), toBack may be used for that, while toFront does the opposite.

Edit
Most of this information was already given in previous posts; however, I added this to emphasize:

  • Java is a platform-independent language.
  • Java is a product of Sun Microsystems (now Oracle).
  • Consquently, using the official Java API Reference Documentation from Sun makes way more sense than relying on any reference documentation provided by Apple, because anything contained within the official API reference documentation will work on all platforms; whereas, anything from Apple's reference documentation may very well to be specific to Apple's implementation.
  • The reference documentation for JFrame from the official, authoritative reference documentation gives all the information necessary for answering the question (hence yet another reason to consult the official API reference documentation, rather than relying on Apple's documentation).
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-1, WindowListener was suggested 6 hours earlier. toBack() was suggested 5 hours earlier. I see no reason to repeat the suggestions. –  camickr May 23 '10 at 3:29
    
Moreover, ApplicationListener is intended to supplement, rather than supplant, the core UI. See README.txt for the OSXAdapter example cited in my answer. –  trashgod May 23 '10 at 16:30
    
@camickr, I wanted to emphasize the use of official reference documentation (see my edit). In addition, the others fail to indicate that "focus" in Java terminology implies keyboard focus (not which window is on top), which my answer also gives. –  Michael Aaron Safyan May 23 '10 at 23:49
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