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typedef struct queue {

  int q[max];
  int qhead;
  int qrear;

} queue;


void init_queue(queue *QUEUE)
{
  QUEUE.qhead = 0;
  QUEUE.qrear = -1;
}
void enqueue(queue *QUEUE,int data)
{
  QUEUE.qrear++;
  QUEUE.q[QUEUE.qrear] = data;
}

int process_queue(queue *QUEUE)
{
  if(QUEUE.qhead > QUEUE.qrear) 
    return -1;
  else
    return QUEUE.q[QUEUE.qhead++];
}

I am implementing queues using arrays just to keep it simple. Wats the error with the above code?

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For future reference, you should include the text of the compiler error message in your question. Those messages exist for a reason. When you get more experienced you will be able to understand them and use them to quickly figure out the errors in your code. Posting them here will also help people to give you better advice. –  A. Levy Sep 8 '10 at 16:52

3 Answers 3

First of all, the . operator is used to access members of a struct. You need -> to access members of a pointer to a struct:

void init_queue(queue *QUEUE)
{
  QUEUE->qhead = 0;
  QUEUE->qrear = -1;
}

Just as a tid-bit, a->b is equivalent to (*a).b - that is, first dereferencing the pointer a, and then accessing a member of that struct.

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Thank you...... –  blacktooth May 22 '10 at 20:45
    
Bingo that first sentence is pure gold. Why don't text books write nice simple distinctions like this. I have three C books, and none of them explain this as transparently. –  Andrew S Feb 17 at 5:04
    
@AndrewS: Thanks! I've found it's actually remarkably difficult to describe things in a straightforward and easy-to-understand way. –  Claudiu Feb 17 at 6:50

Besides the compilation error from using . instead of ->, you also have potential buffer overflow in enqueue; you'll overflow your buffer after max calls. You have a couple of choice depending on what you want.

1) You can turn this into a circular queue:

void enqueue(queue *QUEUE,int data)
{
  QUEUE->qrear = (QUEUE->qrear + 1) % max;
  QUEUE->q[QUEUE->qrear] = data;
}

2) You can stop adding once you hit max:

void enqueue(queue *QUEUE,int data)
{
  if (QUEUE->qrear < (max - 1))
  {
    QUEUE->qrear++;
    QUEUE->q[QUEUE->qrear] = data;
  }
}
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You should use -> instead of .:

Accessing structs' values using pointers is done using QUEUE-> or (*QUEUE). and not QUEUE.. You first need to dereference the pointer and only then access the value.

typedef struct queue {

  int q[max];
  int qhead;
  int qrear;

} queue;


void init_queue(queue *QUEUE)
{
  QUEUE->qhead = 0;
  QUEUE->qrear = -1;
}
void enqueue(queue *QUEUE,int data)
{
  QUEUE->qrear++;
  QUEUE->q[QUEUE->qrear] = data;
}

int process_queue(queue *QUEUE)
{
  if(QUEUE->qhead > QUEUE->qrear) 
    return -1;
  else
    return QUEUE->q[QUEUE->qhead++];
}
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