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I have a header file like this:

/*
 * APP 180-2 ALG-254/258/772 implementation
 * Last update: 03/01/2006
 * Issue date:  08/22/2004
 *
 * Copyright (C) 2006 Somebody's Name here
 * All rights reserved.
 *
 * Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
 * modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
 * are met:
 * 1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
 *    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
 * 2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
 *    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
 *    documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
 * 3. Neither the name of the project nor the names of its contributors
 *    may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software
 *    without specific prior written permission.
 *
 * THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE PROJECT AND CONTRIBUTORS ``AS IS'' AND
 * ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
 * IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE
 * ARE DISCLAIMED.  IN NO EVENT SHALL THE PROJECT OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE
 * FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL
 * DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS
 * OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION)
 * HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT
 * LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY
 * OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
 * SUCH DAMAGE.
 */

#ifndef HEADER_H
#define HEADER_H

/* More comments and C++ code here. */

#endif /* End of file. */

And I wish to extract out the contents of the first C style comment only and drop the " *" at the start of each line to get a file with the following contents:

 APP 180-2 ALG-254/258/772 implementation
 Last update: 03/01/2006
 Issue date:  08/22/2004

 Copyright (C) 2006 Somebody's Name here
 All rights reserved.

 Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
 modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
 are met:
 1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
 2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
    documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
 3. Neither the name of the project nor the names of its contributors
    may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software
    without specific prior written permission.

 THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE PROJECT AND CONTRIBUTORS ``AS IS'' AND
 ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
 IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE
 ARE DISCLAIMED.  IN NO EVENT SHALL THE PROJECT OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE
 FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL
 DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS
 OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION)
 HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT
 LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY
 OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
 SUCH DAMAGE.

Please suggest an easy way to do this with Python, Perl, sed, or some other way on Unix. Preferably as a one-liner.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This should work for you:

sed -n '/\*\//q; /^\/\*/d; s/^ \* \?//p' <file.h >comment.txt

Here's an explanation: sed (as you may know) is a command that goes through a file applying a list of rules to each line. Each rule consists of a "selector" and commands that are applied to that line only if the selector matches.

The first rule has the selector /\*\//. This is a regular expression selector; it matches any line that contains the characters */. Both of these need to be backslash-escaped since they have special meanings in a regexp. (I've assumed that this will only match the closing line of the comment in your case and that this entire line should be deleted.) The command is q which means "quit." sed just stops. Ordinarily it would print out the line, but I provided the -n option which means "don't print unless explicitly instructed to."

The second rule has the selector /^\/\*/ which is again a regexp selector that matches the characters /* at the start of the line. Again, I've assumed this line will not contain part of the comment. The d command tells sed to delete this line and move on.

The final rule has no selector, so it applies to all lines (unless a previous command prevented processing from reaching the final rule). The command in this last rule is a substitution command, s/PATTERN/REPLACEMENT/, which finds text in the line that matches some pattern and replaces it with a replacement text. The pattern here is ^ \* \?, which matches a space, an asterisk, and either 0 or 1 spaces, but only at the beginning of the line. And the replacement is nothing. So sed simply deletes the leading space-asterisk-(space)? sequence. The p is actually a flag to the substitution command that tells sed to print out the result of the substitution. It's needed because of the -n option.

share|improve this answer
    
This is close, it leaves behind empty lines of "/*", " ", " */". The / and */ lines should be deleted and the " *" lines left as blanks. –  WilliamKF May 22 '10 at 21:19
1  
BTW, if you can explain how the command line is interpreted that would be helpful so I can perform this magic myself. –  WilliamKF May 22 '10 at 21:21
    
Yeah, I know, those are the tweaks I was working out. A full solution and explanation are forthcoming. –  David Z May 22 '10 at 21:23
    
Well we could always pipe it through an extra sed, but that would be cheating ;-) –  WilliamKF May 22 '10 at 21:25
    
yeah ;-) this one wasn't too hard though. Notice that I simplified the command a bit in my latest edit. –  David Z May 22 '10 at 21:35

Pyparsing includes a built-in pattern for matching comment formats from various languages. Using cStyleComment and scanString to find the first comment in the source file makes the rest just string functions:

c_src = open(c_source_file).read()

from pyparsing import cStyleComment
cmt = cStyleComment.scanString(c_src).next()[0][0]
lines = [l[3:] for l in cmt.splitlines()]
print '\n'.join(lines)

scanString is a generator that returns each match before going to the next instance, so only the first comment gets processed. With your sample code, this returns:

APP 180-2 ALG-254/258/772 implementation 
Last update: 03/01/2006 
Issue date:  08/22/2004 

Copyright (C) 2006 Somebody's Name here 
All rights reserved. 

Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without 
modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions 
are met: 
1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright 
   notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer. 
2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright 
   notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the 
   documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution. 
3. Neither the name of the project nor the names of its contributors 
   may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software 
   without specific prior written permission. 

THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE PROJECT AND CONTRIBUTORS ``AS IS'' AND 
ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE 
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE 
ARE DISCLAIMED.  IN NO EVENT SHALL THE PROJECT OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE 
FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL 
DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS 
OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) 
HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT 
LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY 
OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF 
SUCH DAMAGE. 
share|improve this answer
    
Even this software fails a basic test: printf("//This is not a comment!"); gets picked up as a comment by cppCommentStyle, but, interestingly, not by cCommentStyle. –  Richard Mar 10 at 3:35
2  
The failure here occurs only because you have added some implicit knowledge to your test, but not to the expression. If you want the string scanner to ignore quoted strings, then just do so: cppStyleComment.ignore(quotedString).scanString('printf("//This is not a comment");').next() will properly raise a StopIteration, since this form gives the additional specification that comments inside quoted strings are not significant. (Of course cStyleComment does not match here, cStyleComments match only /*...*/ comments.) –  Paul McGuire Mar 10 at 5:09
    
scanString goes character-by-character looking specifically for matches of the expression, in your case a cppStyleComment (which matches both /*...*/ and //... comments). scanString starts at position 0, then 1, then 2, etc. each trying to do a match. When it finally gets past the first '"' character, reaching the first '/' character, it does find a valid comment. There is nothing in the definition of any comment expressions to treat quoted strings specially. The OP's test case did not include comments inside quotes, so I did not clutter the solution with this added filter. –  Paul McGuire Mar 10 at 5:16
    
Excellent, thank you for the clarification. –  Richard Mar 10 at 6:09
sed -i -r "s/[\/\ ]{1}\*[\/\ ]?//g" YOURFILENAME

This replaces trims comments from your file, keeping the content. This will modify YOURFILENAME file though. If you don't want that remove -i from the line

share|improve this answer
    
That is close, but it does not strip all the C++ code following the first comment. –  WilliamKF May 22 '10 at 21:16
    
Also, don't wish to side effect the original file, but instead create a new one. –  WilliamKF May 22 '10 at 21:17
    
printf("\\This is not a comment."); and printf("/*Neither is this*/".); –  Richard Mar 10 at 3:26

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