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I'm looking to calculate the number of months between 2 date time fields.

Is there a better way than getting the unix timestamp and the dividing by 2 592 000 (seconds) and rounding up whithin MySQL?

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15 Answers 15

up vote 18 down vote accepted

The DATEDIFF function can give you the number of days between two dates. Which is more accurate, since... how do you define a month? (28, 29, 30, or 31 days?)

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20  
PERIODDIFF can calculate the number of months accurately. –  Max Caceres Feb 18 '09 at 19:29
3  
"More accurate" is incredible subjective when it comes to dates. If, for example, you are in a business that has monthly cycles needing to know how many months are between two dates can be more important than the number of days for the very reason you lay out above. How long is a month? If I need a month count I can't simply divide by 30. –  Thomas Paine Mar 20 '13 at 20:37
1  
This is not the correct answer; you should mark Max's answer correct, below. –  Graham Charles Aug 22 '13 at 23:47
1  
Max's answer is not correct if you want the number of whole months, accounting correctly for leap years and the differing number of days in a month. PERIODDIFF simply takes a YYYYMM value, so unless you account for the days yourself before you pass the YYYYMM values, then all you're calculating is the number of months, rounded up to the nearest month if there is less than a whole number of months. See Zane's answer below. –  rgvcorley May 28 at 16:40
1  
Why are there so many upvotes for the PERIODDIFF comment? Perioddiff doesn't take day values, so you're calculating the number of months rounded up to the nearest month if there is less than a whole number of months –  rgvcorley May 28 at 16:44

PERIOD_DIFF calculates months between two dates.

For example, to calculate the difference between now() and a time column in your_table:

select period_diff(date_format(now(), '%Y%m'), date_format(time, '%Y%m')) as months from your_table;
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1  
Any idea what it does when it could be 11 months and 1 day, so 12 months, but if you change to 30 day months then it'd still be 11? –  Darryl Hein Feb 18 '09 at 20:17
    
11 months and 1 day would return 11 months with the example above. PERIOD_DIFF has no sense of 30 vs 31 day months. –  Max Caceres Feb 18 '09 at 22:06

Month-difference between any given two dates:

I'm surprised this hasn't been mentioned yet:

Have a look at the TIMESTAMPDIFF() function in MySQL.

What this allows you to do is pass in two TIMESTAMP or DATETIME values (or even DATE as MySQL will auto-convert) as well as the unit of time you want to base your difference on.

You can specify MONTH as the unit in the first parameter:

SELECT TIMESTAMPDIFF(MONTH, '2012-05-05', '2012-06-04')
-- Outputs: 0

SELECT TIMESTAMPDIFF(MONTH, '2012-05-05', '2012-06-05')
-- Outputs: 1

SELECT TIMESTAMPDIFF(MONTH, '2012-05-05', '2012-06-15')
-- Outputs: 1

SELECT TIMESTAMPDIFF(MONTH, '2012-05-05', '2012-12-16')
-- Outputs: 7

It basically gets the number of months elapsed from the first date in the parameter list. This solution automatically compensates for the varying amount of days in each month (28,30,31) as well as taking into account leap years — you don't have to worry about any of that stuff.


Month-difference with precision:

It's a little more complicated if you want to introduce decimal precision in the number of months elapsed, but here is how you can do it:

SELECT 
  TIMESTAMPDIFF(MONTH, startdate, enddate) +
  DATEDIFF(
    enddate,
    startdate + INTERVAL
      TIMESTAMPDIFF(MONTH, startdate, enddate)
    MONTH
  ) /
  DATEDIFF(
    startdate + INTERVAL
      TIMESTAMPDIFF(MONTH, startdate, enddate) + 1
    MONTH,
    startdate + INTERVAL
      TIMESTAMPDIFF(MONTH, startdate, enddate)
    MONTH
  )

Where startdate and enddate are your date parameters, whether it be from two date columns in a table or as input parameters from a script:

Examples:

With startdate = '2012-05-05' AND enddate = '2012-05-27':
-- Outputs: 0.7097

With startdate = '2012-05-05' AND enddate = '2012-06-13':
-- Outputs: 1.2667

With startdate = '2012-02-27' AND enddate = '2012-06-02':
-- Outputs: 3.1935
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Very useful - thanks! :) –  Marek Apr 12 '13 at 12:04
    
This is the correct answer, all the upvotes for the PERIODDIFF comment on the selected answer are very miss-leading –  rgvcorley May 28 at 16:44
    
Thanks, in my case I needed inclusive dates, so I replaces all "enddate" with "date_add(enddate,interval 1 day)". Then 2014-03-01 to 2014-05-31 will give 3.00 instead of 2.97 –  Sven Tore Jun 7 at 7:04

I use also PERIODDIFF. To get the year and the month of the date, I use the function EXTRACT:

  SELECT PERIOD_DIFF(EXTRACT(YEAR_MONTH FROM NOW()), EXTRACT(YEAR_MONTH FROM time)) AS months FROM your_table;
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2  
Incredible! It use 50% less time that DATE_FORMAT method, thanks! +1 –  David Rodrigues Sep 4 '11 at 11:44
1  
Here for a unix timestamp SELECT PERIOD_DIFF(EXTRACT(YEAR_MONTH FROM NOW()), EXTRACT(YEAR_MONTH FROM FROM_UNIXTIME(time, "%Y%m%d"))) AS months FROM your_table; –  Smolla Mar 6 '12 at 2:48
    
This is incorrect, PERIOD_DIFF doesn't take day values, so you're calculating the number of months rounded up to the nearest month if there is less than a whole number of months. You should edit your answer to make this clear. –  rgvcorley May 28 at 16:46

From the MySQL manual:

PERIOD_DIFF(P1,P2)

Returns the number of months between periods P1 and P2. P1 and P2 should be in the format YYMM or YYYYMM. Note that the period arguments P1 and P2 are not date values.

mysql> SELECT PERIOD_DIFF(200802,200703); -> 11

So it may be possible to do something like this:

Select period_diff(concat(year(d1),if(month(d1)<10,'0',''),month(d1)), concat(year(d2),if(month(d2)<10,'0',''),month(d2))) as months from your_table;

Where d1 and d2 are the date expressions.

I had to use the if() statements to make sure that the months was a two digit number like 02 rather than 2.

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Is there a better way? yes. Do not use MySQL Timestamps. Apart from the fact that they occupy 36 Bytes, they are not at all convenient to work with. I would reccomend using Julian Date and Seconds from midnight for all date/time values. These can be combined to form a UnixDateTime. If this is stored in a DWORD (unsigned 4 Byte Integer) then dates all the way up to 2106 can be stored as seconds since epoc, 01/01/1970 DWORD max val = 4,294,967,295 - A DWORD can hold 136 years of Seconds

Julian Dates are very nice to work with when making date calculations UNIXDateTime values are good to work with when making Date/Time calculations Neither are good to look at, so I use the Timestamps when I need a column that I will not be doing much calculation with, but I want an at-a-glance indication.

Converting to Julian and back can be done very quickly in a good language. Using pointers I have it down to about 900 Clks (This is also a conversion from a STRING to an INTEGER of course)

When you get into serious applications that use Date/Time information like for example the financial markets, Julian dates are de-facto.

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Where did you get the info about the fact they occupy 36 bytes? MySQL manual states storage requirement for TIMESTAMP column is 4 bytes. dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/storage-requirements.html –  poncha Apr 14 '13 at 21:56
    
start planning for the Y2106 bug now! ;-) –  ErichBSchulz Jul 13 '13 at 7:54

I prefer this way, because evryone will understand it clearly at the first glance:

SELECT
    12 * (YEAR(to) - YEAR(from)) + (MONTH(to) - MONTH(from)) AS months
FROM
    tab;
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select period_diff(date_format(now(),"%Y%m"),date_format(created,"%Y%m")) from customers where..

Gives a number of calendar months since the created datestamp on a customer record, letting MySQL do the month selection internally.

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DROP FUNCTION IF EXISTS `calcula_edad` $$
CREATE DEFINER=`root`@`localhost` FUNCTION `calcula_edad`(pFecha1 date, pFecha2 date, pTipo char(1)) RETURNS int(11)
Begin

  Declare vMeses int;
  Declare vEdad int;

  Set vMeses = period_diff( date_format( pFecha1, '%Y%m' ), date_format( pFecha2, '%Y%m' ) ) ;

  /* Si el dia de la fecha1 es menor al dia de fecha2, restar 1 mes */
  if day(pFecha1) < day(pFecha2) then
    Set vMeses = VMeses - 1;
  end if;

  if pTipo='A' then
    Set vEdad = vMeses div 12 ;
  else
    Set vEdad = vMeses ;
  end if ;
  Return vEdad;
End

select calcula_edad(curdate(),born_date,'M') --  for number of months between 2 dates
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Execute this code and it will create a function datedeifference which will give you the difference in date format yyyy-mm-dd.

DELIMITER $$

CREATE FUNCTION datedifference(date1 DATE, date2 DATE) RETURNS DATE
NO SQL

BEGIN
    DECLARE dif DATE;
    IF DATEDIFF(date1, DATE(CONCAT(YEAR(date1),'-', MONTH(date1), '-', DAY(date2)))) < 0    THEN
                SET dif=DATE_FORMAT(
                                        CONCAT(
                                            PERIOD_DIFF(date_format(date1, '%y%m'),date_format(date2, '%y%m'))DIV 12 , 
                                            '-',
                                            PERIOD_DIFF(date_format(date1, '%y%m'),date_format(date2, '%y%m'))% 12 , 
                                            '-',
                                            DATEDIFF(date1, DATE(CONCAT(YEAR(date1),'-', MONTH(DATE_SUB(date1, INTERVAL 1 MONTH)), '-', DAY(date2))))),
                                        '%Y-%m-%d');
    ELSEIF DATEDIFF(date1, DATE(CONCAT(YEAR(date1),'-', MONTH(date1), '-', DAY(date2)))) < DAY(LAST_DAY(DATE_SUB(date1, INTERVAL 1 MONTH))) THEN
                SET dif=DATE_FORMAT(
                                        CONCAT(
                                            PERIOD_DIFF(date_format(date1, '%y%m'),date_format(date2, '%y%m'))DIV 12 , 
                                            '-',
                                            PERIOD_DIFF(date_format(date1, '%y%m'),date_format(date2, '%y%m'))% 12 , 
                                            '-',
                                            DATEDIFF(date1, DATE(CONCAT(YEAR(date1),'-', MONTH(date1), '-', DAY(date2))))),
                                        '%Y-%m-%d');
    ELSE
                SET dif=DATE_FORMAT(
                                        CONCAT(
                                            PERIOD_DIFF(date_format(date1, '%y%m'),date_format(date2, '%y%m'))DIV 12 , 
                                            '-',
                                            PERIOD_DIFF(date_format(date1, '%y%m'),date_format(date2, '%y%m'))% 12 , 
                                            '-',
                                            DATEDIFF(date1, DATE(CONCAT(YEAR(date1),'-', MONTH(date1), '-', DAY(date2))))),
                                        '%Y-%m-%d');
    END IF;

RETURN dif;
END $$
DELIMITER;
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Do you think you'd could clean up and comment your code a bit so it's a little more understandable? Thanks –  Darryl Hein Jul 25 '11 at 18:24

This depends on how you want the # of months to be defined. Answer this questions: 'What is difference in months: Feb 15, 2008 - Mar 12, 2009'. Is it defined by clear cut # of days which depends on leap years- what month it is, or same day of previous month = 1 month.

A calculation for Days:

Feb 15 -> 29 (leap year) = 14 Mar 1, 2008 + 365 = Mar 1, 2009. Mar 1 -> Mar 12 = 12 days. 14 + 365 + 12 = 391 days. Total = 391 days / (avg days in month = 30) = 13.03333

A calculation of months:

Feb 15 2008 - Feb 15 2009 = 12 Feb 15 -> Mar 12 = less than 1 month Total = 12 months, or 13 if feb 15 - mar 12 is considered 'the past month'

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See my post at: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/date-and-time-functions.html

Look for post of May 5 2008 3:48pm.

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This query worked for me:)

SELECT * FROM tbl_purchase_receipt
WHERE purchase_date BETWEEN '2008-09-09' AND '2009-09-09'

It simply take two dates and retrieves the values between them.

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SELECT * 
FROM emp_salaryrevise_view 
WHERE curr_year Between '2008' AND '2009' 
    AND MNTH Between '12' AND '1'
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You can get years, months and days this way:

SELECT 
username
,date_of_birth
,DATE_FORMAT(CURDATE(), '%Y') - DATE_FORMAT(date_of_birth, '%Y') - (DATE_FORMAT(CURDATE(), '00-%m-%d') < DATE_FORMAT(date_of_birth, '00-%m-%d')) AS years
,PERIOD_DIFF( DATE_FORMAT(CURDATE(), '%Y%m') , DATE_FORMAT(date_of_birth, '%Y%m') ) AS months
,DATEDIFF(CURDATE(),date_of_birth) AS days
FROM users
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