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Similar to this question, but in 2.0, we want to sort by one element, then another. we want to achieve the functional equivalent of SELECT * from Table ORDER BY x, y

We have a class that contains a number of sorting functions, and we have no issues sorting by one element. For example:

public class MyClass {
    public int x;
    public int y;
}  

List<MyClass> MyList;

public void SortList() {
    MyList.Sort( MySortingFunction );
}

And we have the following in the list:

Unsorted     Sorted(x)     Desired
---------    ---------    ---------
ID   x  y    ID   x  y    ID   x  y
[0]  0  1    [2]  0  2    [0]  0  1
[1]  1  1    [0]  0  1    [2]  0  2
[2]  0  2    [1]  1  1    [1]  1  1
[3]  1  2    [3]  1  2    [3]  1  2

I think we are looking for some way to implement a stable sort, but I'm happy to take any suggestions!

edit:

OK, as often seems to be the case, the act of asking the question has released a mental block!

@nobugz - I implemented this just before I saw your answer! Thanks, that's the way to do it in this case. Except I don't use anonymous methods, 'cause I've got a few different sorts for this class.

@Jonathan Holland - If I need to add another sort I'll use something like yours!

@Bill The Lizard - that MS link refreshed my memory!

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6 Answers 6

up vote 65 down vote accepted

You don't need a stable sort if you compare all members. For example:

public void SortList() {
   MyList.Sort(delegate(MyClass a, MyClass b)
   {
      int xdiff = a.x.CompareTo(b.x);
      if (xdiff != 0) return xdiff;
      else return a.y.CompareTo(b.y);
   });
}
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List<SomeClass>() a;
List<SomeClass> b = a.OrderBy(x => x.x).ThenBy(x => x.y).ToList();
etc.

Also see ThenByDescending;

edit: sorry didn't notice the 2.0

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17  
Don't be sorry - you just introduced me to a useful extension method I hadn't noticed. Thanks! –  Jamie Penney Nov 14 '08 at 2:35
1  
Much love for illuminating that particular method! –  omglolbah Jul 28 '11 at 22:17
    
Yeah, looks nice, but I'm getting 'System.Collections.Generic.List<Class>' does not contain a definition for 'OrderBy' and no extension method 'OrderBy' accepting a first argument of type 'System.Collections.Generic.List<Class>' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?) –  Burjua Nov 23 '11 at 16:33
6  
@Burjua Add using System.Linq –  Episodex Dec 22 '11 at 10:18
3  
+1 still the most elegant solution (if you can use linq) –  D.Rosado May 11 '12 at 12:54

You need to implement the IComparer interface. Here's a good post with example code.

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The trick is to implement a stable sort. I've created a Widget class that can contain your test data:

public class Widget : IComparable
{
    int x;
    int y;
    public int X
    {
        get { return x; }
        set { x = value; }
    }

    public int Y
    {
        get { return y; }
        set { y = value; }
    }

    public Widget(int argx, int argy)
    {
        x = argx;
        y = argy;
    }

    public int CompareTo(object obj)
    {
        int result = 1;
        if (obj != null && obj is Widget)
        {
            Widget w = obj as Widget;
            result = this.X.CompareTo(w.X);
        }
        return result;
    }

    static public int Compare(Widget x, Widget y)
    {
        int result = 1;
        if (x != null && y != null)                
        {                
            result = x.CompareTo(y);
        }
        return result;
    }
}

I implemented IComparable, so it can be unstably sorted by List.Sort().

However, I also implemented the static method Compare, which can be passed as a delegate to a search method.

I borrowed this insertion sort method from C# 411:

 public static void InsertionSort<T>(IList<T> list, Comparison<T> comparison)
        {           
            int count = list.Count;
            for (int j = 1; j < count; j++)
            {
                T key = list[j];

                int i = j - 1;
                for (; i >= 0 && comparison(list[i], key) > 0; i--)
                {
                    list[i + 1] = list[i];
                }
                list[i + 1] = key;
            }
    }

You would put this in the sort helpers class that you mentioned in your question.

Now, to use it:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<Widget> widgets = new List<Widget>();

        widgets.Add(new Widget(0, 1));
        widgets.Add(new Widget(1, 1));
        widgets.Add(new Widget(0, 2));
        widgets.Add(new Widget(1, 2));

        InsertionSort<Widget>(widgets, Widget.Compare);

        foreach (Widget w in widgets)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(w.X + ":" + w.Y);
        }
    }

And it outputs:

0:1
0:2
1:1
1:2
Press any key to continue . . .

This could probably be cleaned up with some anonymous delegates, but I'll leave that up to you.

EDIT: And NoBugz demonstrates the power of anonymous methods...so, consider mine more oldschool :P

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Wow, thanks Jonathan, above and beyond! –  Byron Ross Nov 14 '08 at 2:16

This may help you, How to Sort C# Generic List

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I had an issue where OrderBy and ThenBy did not give me the desired result (or I just didn't know how to use them correctly).

I went with a list.Sort solution something like this.

    var data = (from o in database.Orders Where o.ClientId.Equals(clientId) select new {
    OrderId = o.id,
    OrderDate = o.orderDate,
    OrderBoolean = (SomeClass.SomeFunction(o.orderBoolean) ? 1 : 0)
    });

    data.Sort((o1, o2) => (o2.OrderBoolean.CompareTo(o1.OrderBoolean) != 0
    o2.OrderBoolean.CompareTo(o1.OrderBoolean) : o1.OrderDate.Value.CompareTo(o2.OrderDate.Value)));
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