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Given a array of random integers, sort the odd elements in descending order and even numbers in ascending order.

Example input: (1,4,5,2,3,6,7)
Output: (7,5,3,1,2,4,6)

Optimize for time complexity.

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1  
Sounds like homework? –  Donnie May 23 '10 at 2:43
    
So what are you asking? How to optimize it? People usually appreciate some kind of an attempt before they're willing to help you. (i.e. post some code and people will be happy to help you optimize it) –  advs89 May 23 '10 at 2:44
1  
A "Microsoft interview question" geeksforgeeks.org/forum/topic/… –  WhirlWind May 23 '10 at 2:46
    
Hint: It's O(n log n). –  Stephen May 23 '10 at 2:49
    
What have you tried? Why don't you like your first solution? What are you considering as an optimization, and what's your specific question about that consideration? –  Kate Gregory May 23 '10 at 2:54

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Which language is it, C or C++ (I see both tags)

In C++, you can use std::sort() with appropriate ordering function. In C, qsort() works similarly:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
bool Order(int a, int b)
{
        if (a%2 != b%2) return a%2;
        else return a%2 ? b<a : a<b;
}
int main()
{
        int a[] = {1,4,5,2,3,6,7};
        size_t N = sizeof(a) / sizeof(a[0]);

        std::sort(a, a+N, Order);

        for(size_t i=0; i<N; ++i)
                std::cout << a[i] << ' ';
        std::cout << std::endl;

}
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I'm always suspicious when I see signed integers combined with the modulus operator. Does your solution work with negative numbers? –  FredOverflow May 23 '10 at 10:29
1  
On the compilers I could test it does, but you're right, of course, it's implementation defined in C++ per 5.6/4 [expr.mul] with a footnote that rounding to zero is preferred.. –  Cubbi May 23 '10 at 19:14

Here's a c# one-liner:

int[] x = { 1,4,5,2,3,6,7 };
Array.Sort(x, (a, b) => a % 2 == 0 ? b % 2 == 0 ? a.CompareTo(b) : 1 : b % 2 == 0 ? -1 : -1 * a.CompareTo(b));

Don't turn it in to your teacher. Your teacher wants to see you implement the sorting algorithm yourself, so he knows you can do it and knows you understand what's involved.

In practice, you'll (almost) never do that on the job. Your platform will already have highly-optimized sort methods, and you want to take advantage of those, be it C#'s Array.Sort() or .OrderBy() or a C++ stl algorithm. This code was to show you how you might solve this problem in the real world, albeit if I wanted this to pass a code review I might not squeeze it all on one line.

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Just to give an alternative solution:

#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>

bool is_odd(int x)
{
    return x & 1;
}

int* rushakoff(int* begin, int* end)
{
    int* middle = std::partition(begin, end, is_odd);
    std::sort(begin, middle, std::greater<int>());
    std::sort(middle, end, std::less<int>());
    return middle;
}

int main()
{
    int array[] = {1,4,5,2,3,6,7};
    rushakoff(array, array + 7);
}

Maybe not so optimal, but quite readable. That's important, too ;-)

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int* rushakoff??? WTF, my last name isn't "quite readable". –  Mark Rushakoff May 23 '10 at 19:42
// Sort with a custom comparison function
// returns -1 if a before b, 0 if a==b, 1 if a after b
int _cmp(a,b) {
  if (a % 2) == 0 {
    if (b % 2) == 0 {
      return (a>b) ? 1 : (a==b) 0 : -1; # Even(a) vs Even(b)
    } else {
      return 1; # Even(a) vs Odd(b) all evens are after all odds
    }
  } else {
    if (b % 2) == 0 {
      return -1; # Odd(a) vs Even(b) all odds are before all evens
    } else {
      return (b>a) ? 1 : (a==b) 0 : -1; # Odd(a) vs Odd(b) has reverse order
    }
  }
}
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With integers as the sort target, you can get this to an O(n) sort using a count sort and a little care.

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A count sort?!? Yes, O(n)... if you don't mind an implied constant of 2^32 or so. –  Charles May 23 '10 at 6:00
    
Ok, let me change that to bytes instead of ints - I read his range and assumed bytes. My bad. BTW, 4n if you do it in 4 passes... –  Michael Dorgan May 23 '10 at 19:03

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