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I have parsed a java.util.Date from a String but it is setting the local timezone as the timzone of the date object.

The timezone is not specified in the String from which Date is parsed. I want to set a specific timezone of the date object.

How can I do that?

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5  
While not really an answer to your question, I've used Joda Time after seeing it mentioned here a few times. It seems more rational to me than the standard APIs, and can do this sort of thing quite easily. –  msandiford May 23 '10 at 10:40
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5 Answers

up vote 58 down vote accepted

Use DateFormat. For example,

    SimpleDateFormat isoFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss");
    isoFormat.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC"));
    Date date = isoFormat.parse("2010-05-23T09:01:02");
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if the date is created from Calendar class, you can set the timezone for Calendar. –  lwpro2 Jan 11 '13 at 3:07
    
Good answer, this helped me. Thanks. –  EM-Creations Mar 25 '13 at 17:15
    
I want to up vote this answer multiple times man! It helped me. –  Gugan Sep 6 '13 at 6:00
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Be aware that java.util.Date objects do not contain any timezone information by themselves - you cannot set the timezone on a Date object. The only thing that a Date object contains is a number of milliseconds since the "epoch" - 1 January 1970, 00:00:00 UTC.

As ZZ Coder shows, you set the timezone on the DateFormat object, to tell it in which timezone you want to display the date and time.

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After a Googling, experimenting and expleting, I've realised this is a precise and helpful addition to the answer - and worth highlighting: Date only contains the millisecond value. If you look at the source, there's pretty much just a long field called fastTime. Date.toString() actually uses a Calendar to interpret this millisecond time. So printing out a Date makes it appear to have a (default) timezone, leading to understandable questions about how to set that timezone. –  Carboni Jul 11 '12 at 13:41
    
there IS timezone info inside the Date objects. But it might be true, you cannot change it. –  lwpro2 Jan 11 '13 at 3:09
2  
@Iwpro2, Jesper claims (and I agree) that the Date object does not store a time zone. If you are claiming that the time zone is stored inside java.util.Date please provide a reference. –  Jim Aug 20 '13 at 19:57
    
@Jim, this is the source code for java.util.Date. It contains fastTime as unix epoch as well as BaseCalendar.Date cdate that is used in favor of fastTime, if it is defined. That one contains timezone information. I understand it so that a Date instance can contain timezone information, but it might not. –  eis Sep 5 '13 at 14:50
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@eis Interesting. Where do you see that you can set the time zone of that internal cdate? As far as I can tell, it uses the user's default timezone, which sounds like the OPs problem. Also cdate is used with a bunch of the deprecated parts of Date, which seems like it would be better to stay away from. –  Jim Sep 9 '13 at 19:20
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You could also set the timezone at the JVM level

Date date1 = new Date();
System.out.println(date1);

TimeZone.setDefault(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC"));
// or pass in a command line arg: -Duser.timezone="UTC"

Date date2 = new Date();
System.out.println(date2);

output:
Thu Sep 05 10:11:12 EDT 2013
Thu Sep 05 14:11:12 UTC 2013

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This helped me. setting timeZone in SDF didn't make any diff –  sonic Dec 18 '13 at 15:58
    
I think its more reliable. (+1) –  smilepleeeaz Dec 20 '13 at 12:23
    
Beware: Calling TimeZone.setDefault is rather drastic, as it affects the entire JVM, affects all other objects and threads. See this answer for details including even more complications if you are running with a SecurityManager. Adding even more complication: This behavior has changed in various versions of Java, as discussed in this Question. –  Basil Bourque Mar 2 at 10:53
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java.util.Calendar is the usual way to handle time zones using just JDK classes. Apache Commons has some further alternatives/utilities that may be helpful. Edit Spong's note reminded me that I've heard really good things about Joda-Time (though I haven't used it myself).

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+1 for Joda Time. While it doesn't provide any additional functionality that you couldn't get from the standard Java API (that I've found in any case - happy to be shown otherwise), Joda Time does make some tasks easier. –  Joshua Hutchison Feb 18 '13 at 11:07
    
@JoshuaHutchison Joda-Time has tons of additional functionality. Example: Representing spans of time with the classes Period, Duration, and Interval. Those spans include comparison methods such as contains, abuts, overlap, and gap. And PeriodFormatterBuilder can build descriptive phrases such as "15 years and 8 months". –  Basil Bourque Mar 2 at 10:32
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No Time Zone in j.u.Date

As the other correct answers stated, a java.util.Date has no time zone. It represents UTC/GMT (no time zone offset). Very confusing because its toString method applies the JVM's default time zone when generating a String representation.

Avoid j.u.Date

For this and many other reasons, you should avoid using the built-in java.util.Date & .Calendar & java.text.SimpleDateFormat. They are notoriously troublesome. Instead use either Joda-Time or the new java.time package bundled with Java 8 (inspired by Joda-Time, defined by JSR 310).

Joda-Time

In Joda-Time, a date-time object (DateTime) truly does know its assigned time zone. That means an offset from UTC and the rules and history of that time zone’s Daylight Saving Time (DST) and other such anomalies.

String input = "2014-1-2T03:04:05";
DateTimeZone timeZone = DateTimeZone.forID( "Asia/Kolkata" );
DateTime dateTimeIndia = new DateTime( input, timeZone );
DateTime dateTimeUtcGmt = dateTimeIndia.withZone( DateTimeZone.UTC );

Call the toString method to generate a String in ISO 8601 format.

String output = dateTimeIndia.toString();

Joda-Time also offers rich capabilities for generating all kinds of other String formats.

Search StackOverflow for "joda date" to find many more examples, some quite detailed.

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