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Visual Studio likes to be helpful when typing:

Event +=

by generating code like:

Event += new EventHandler(EventClassName_Event);

void EventClassName_Event(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    throw new System.NotImplementedException();
}

Ideally I would like to remove the explicit delegate and add an explicit private. Like so:

Event += EventClassName_Event;

private void EventClassName_Event(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    throw new System.NotImplementedException();
}

I've looked to see if there is a snippet, but found nothing. Any suggestions? I do have ReSharper installed if there is a way that it can do this.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

With Resharper if I type:

myObject.SomeEvent +=

then hit Ctrl-Shift-Space, I get the option to create a method or a delegate (or to use an existing method). I think this is what you want.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hmm, ctrl-shift-space isn't doing anything. Maybe I need to change a setting? – Todd White Nov 14 '08 at 4:44
    
Hmm definitely works for me. It's called "Smart Completion" (jetbrains.com/resharper/features/coding_assistance.html) – cbp Nov 14 '08 at 4:51
    
When I go to tools -> options -> Environtment -> Keyboard it looks like ctrl+shift+space is assigned to Edit.ParameterInfo. Maybe it should be something different? – Todd White Nov 14 '08 at 4:57
2  
Looks like on my machine it was setup to be Ctrl+Alt+Space, not sure why that was chosen. The command that is run is "ReSharper.ReSharper_CompleteCodeSmart". – Todd White Nov 14 '08 at 5:15
    
Smart Completion is a ReSharper feature. – brgerner Mar 6 '12 at 11:27

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