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How to rotate a N x N matrix by 90 degrees. I want it to be inplace?

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Duplicate of How do you rotate a two dimensional array? (the code in those solutions is mostly not C++, but the algorithms are straightforward enough that converting to C++ should be trivial in most cases) –  James McNellis May 23 '10 at 19:29
2  
That depends on how the matrix is stored in your data structure. What have you tried so far? –  Greg Hewgill May 23 '10 at 19:29
    
Clockwise or anti-clockwise ? –  Paul R May 23 '10 at 19:31
    
Clockwise, please make sure that you don't create a extra matrix. –  Passionate programmer May 23 '10 at 19:33
    
@James, the question you linked to doesn't require rotation to be in-place, and none of the answers suggests such a solution. –  Pavel Shved May 23 '10 at 19:34

6 Answers 6

up vote 31 down vote accepted
for(int i=0; i<n/2; i++)
   for(int j=0; j<(n+1)/2; j++)
       cyclic_roll(m[i][j], m[n-1-j][i], m[n-1-i][n-1-j], m[j][n-1-i]);


void cyclic_roll(int &a, int &b, int &c, int &d)
{
   int temp = a;
   a = b;
   b = c;
   c = d;
   d = temp;
}

Note I haven't tested this, just compoosed now on the spot. Please test before doing anything with it.

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could you explain on how did you come up with the indexes ? –  Passionate programmer May 23 '10 at 19:38
2  
Explaining the indexes.. well, think where the location at (i,j) goes when rotating 90 degrees. Just imagine the picutre. (i,j)->(end-j, i). As high as the original was far from the left, and as far from the left as it was from the bottom of the matrix. –  Pavel Radzivilovsky May 23 '10 at 19:42
1  
If one rotates counter-clockwise, the mapping is a[p][k] --> a[N-1-k][p] --> a[N-1-p][N-1-k] --> a[k][N-1-p]. I think there is also an error in the constrain for i. It should be i < n/2 in the for loop (for j it's ok). Look at the 3x3 example below. Number 4 gets taken care of, when rotating 2. You don't want to rotate for i = 1 and j = 0 again. –  Maciej Hehl May 23 '10 at 19:50
2  
I can't edit. The code should be for(int i=0; i < N/2; i++) for(int j=0; j < (N+1)/2; j++) cyclic_roll(a[i][j], a[N-1-j][i], a[N-1-i][N-1-j], a[j][N-1-i]); –  Maciej Hehl May 23 '10 at 20:45
1  
The third parameter to the cyclic_roll function still needs a correction. It Should be a[n-1-i][n-1-j] :) –  Maciej Hehl May 23 '10 at 21:38

here is my solution: (rotate pi/2 clockwise)

1)do the transpose of the array, (like matrix transpose)

2)reverse the elements for each row

cons int row = 10;
cons int col = 10;
//transpose
for(int r = 0; r < row; r++)
{
  for(int c = r; c < col; c++)
  {  
    swap(Array[r][c], Array[c][r]);
  }
}
//reverse elements on row order
for(int r = 0; r < row; r++)
{
    for(int c =0; c < col/2; c++)
    {
      swap(Array[r][c], Array[r][col-c-1])
    }
}

if rotate pi/2 in counter-clockwise

1) transpose the array

2) reverse the elements on column order

never test the code! any suggestion would be appreciated!

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Each element will be moved twice (compared to 1.25 times in @Pavel Radzivilovsky's answer), so this is less efficient. The "upside" is that since there is no need for an int temp, the memory requirement is reduced by all of four bytes... –  Jean-François Corbett Aug 3 '11 at 6:18
    
agreed with @Jean-FrançoisCorbett not as efficient as the other ans. But, this one is simpler for sure. Actually, i also implemented same algo!! –  MalTec Jul 28 '12 at 19:55

A complete C program which illustrates my approach. Essentially it's recursive algo. At each recursion you rotate the outer layer. Stop when your matrix is 1x1 or 0x0.

#include <stdio.h>

int matrix[4][4] = {
     {11, 12, 13, 14},
     {21, 22, 23, 24},
     {31, 32, 33, 34},
     {41, 42, 43, 44} 
};

void print_matrix(int n)
{
   for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
      for (int j = 0; j < n; j++) {
         printf(" %d ", matrix[i][j]);
      }
      printf("\n");
   }
}

int *get(int offset, int x, int y)
{
   return &matrix[offset + x][offset + y];
}

void transpose(int offset, int n)
{
   if (n > 1) {
      for (int i = 0; i < n - 1; i++) {
         int *val1 = get(offset, 0, i);
         int *val2 = get(offset, i, n - 1);
         int *val3 = get(offset, n - 1, n - 1 - i);
         int *val4 = get(offset, n - 1 - i, 0);

         int temp = *val1;
         *val1 = *val4;
         *val4 = *val3;
         *val3 = *val2;
         *val2 = temp;
      }

      transpose(offset + 1, n - 2);
   }
}

main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
   print_matrix(4);
   transpose(0, 4);
   print_matrix(4);
   return 0;
}
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//Java version, fully tested

public class Rotate90degree {


        public static void reverseElementsRowWise(int[][] matrix) {
            int n = matrix.length;
            for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
                for(int j = 0; j < n / 2; ++j) {
                    int temp = matrix[i][n - j - 1];
                    matrix[i][n - j - 1] = matrix[i][j];
                    matrix[i][j] = temp;
                }
            }
        }

        public static void transpose(int[][] matrix) {
            int n = matrix.length;
            for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
                for(int j = i + 1; j < n; ++j) {
                    int temp = matrix[i][j];
                    matrix[i][j] = matrix[j][i];
                    matrix[j][i] = temp;
                }
            }
        }

        public static void rotate90(int[][] matrix) {
            transpose(matrix);
            reverseElementsRowWise(matrix);
        }

        public static void print(int[][] matrix) {
            int n = matrix.length;
            for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
                for(int j = 0; j < n; ++j) {
                    System.out.print(matrix[i][j]);
                    System.out.print(' ');
                }
                System.out.println();
            }
        }

        public static void main(String[] args) {
            int[][] matrix = {
                    {1, 2, 3, 4},
                    {5, 6, 7, 8},
                    {9, 10, 11, 12},
                    {13, 14, 15, 16}};
            System.out.println("before");
            print(matrix);
            rotate90(matrix);
            System.out.println("after");
            print(matrix);
        }
}
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You could create a second array and then copy the first one into the second one by reading row-major in the first one and writing column-major to the second one.

So you would copy:

1  2  3
4  5  6
7  8  9

and you would read the first row then write it back up starting like:

3
2
1
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The complexity of the algos are the same bigO(n), recursive are nice if it is easy to remember, but the recursive algo for rotate matrix 90 degree is not easy to remember after three months,

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