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What does it mean when a object has 2 asterisks at the beginning?

**variable
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23  
Does it take eight answers to explain what a pointer to a pointer is? –  Andreas Rejbrand May 23 '10 at 19:45
6  
@Andreas People jump all over the trivial questions, because they get lots of views (106 so far) and thus lots of upvotes. Hence 16 upvotes in 17 minutes for a relatively basic answer –  Michael Mrozek May 23 '10 at 19:54
2  
@Andreas: I'm surprised there were so many direct answers to such an... how should I say, indirect question. ;-) –  James McNellis May 23 '10 at 22:01
4  
In addition to being easy rep, simple questions aso have the widest audience. I could answer this question, you could answer this question, a person who's three weeks into his first CS class could probably answer this question, etc. So even if a lower percentage of people choose to answer, it's still likely to get a lot of answers. That's an unfortunate flaw in the SO system — rare knowledge is likely to receive less reward. –  Chuck May 23 '10 at 22:26
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Without any code surprised no-one offered up multiplication using a pointer. result = x **pointer; –  Stephen Nutt May 24 '10 at 1:17
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12 Answers 12

up vote 15 down vote accepted

It is pointer to pointer. For more details you can check : Pointer to pointer

EDIT It can be good for example for dynamically allocating multidimensional arrays :

Like :

#include <stdlib.h>

int **array;
array = malloc(nrows * sizeof(int *));
if(array == NULL)
{
    fprintf(stderr, "out of memory\n");
    exit or return
}
for(i = 0; i < nrows; i++)
{
    array[i] = malloc(ncolumns * sizeof(int));
    if(array[i] == NULL)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "out of memory\n");
        exit or return
    }
}
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1  
It would also be a good idea to demonstrate properly freeing the multidimensional array in reverse order of allocation. –  Adam Rosenfield May 23 '10 at 19:53
    
Yes you are right :). Not forget to use for(int i = 0; i < nrows; i++) free(array[i]); free(array); to free allocated memory. –  Incognito May 23 '10 at 20:08
    
Thank you. That link was the most beneficial. –  numerical25 May 23 '10 at 20:18
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In a declaration, it means it's a pointer to a pointer:

int **x;  // declare x as a pointer to a pointer to an int

When using it, it deferences it twice:

int x = 1;
int *y = &x;  // declare y as a pointer to x
int **z = &y;  // declare z as a pointer to y
**z = 2;  // sets the thing pointed to (the thing pointed to by z) to 2
          // i.e., sets x to 2
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And what if you were to set z to 2 using just one point *z = 2 ?? –  numerical25 May 23 '10 at 20:14
3  
@num It would change y to point to the memory location 2, and *y = 1; or **z = 1; would both try to change the memory at address 2, which is almost certainly outside the legal range you've been allocated –  Michael Mrozek May 23 '10 at 20:31
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Pointer to a pointer when declaring the variable.

Double pointer de-reference when used outside the declaration.

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It means that the variable is a pointer to a pointer.

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Pointer to a pointer.

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You can use cdecl to explain C-types.

There's an online interface here: http://cdecl.org/. Enter "int **x" into the text field and check the result.

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It is a pointer to a pointer. You can use this if you want to point to an array, or a const char * (string). Also, in Objective-C with Cocoa this is often used to point to an NSError*.

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**variable is double dereference. If variable is an address of an address, the resulting expression will be the lvalue at the address stored in *variable.

It can mean different things if it's a part of declaration:

type **variable would mean, on the other hand, a pointer to a pointer, that is, a variable that can hold address of another variable, which is also a pointer, but this time to a variable of type 'type'

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It means that the variable is dereferenced twice. Assume you have a pointer to a pointer to char like this:

char** variable = ...;

If you want to access the value this pointer is pointing to, you have to dereference it twice:

**variable

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Pointer to another pointer

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If he's asking a question this basic, he probably needs the concept of a pointer explained, too. –  agf Apr 14 '12 at 2:53
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** is a pointer to a pointer. These are sometimes used for arrays of strings.

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its a pointer to pointer,. as in if *x means that it will contain an address of some variable than if i say m=&x than m is shown as int **m

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