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I am stuck with this problems for a long time now.

Everything I try to do is insert a row in my DB if it's new information - if not update the existing one.

I've updated many entities in my life before - but what's wrong with this code is beyond me (probably something pretty basic) I guess I can't see the wood for the trees...

private Models.databaseDataContext db = new Models.databaseDataContext();

internal void StoreInformations(IEnumerable<EntityType> iEnumerable)
{
 foreach (EntityType item in iEnumerable)
 {
  EntityType type = db.EntityType.Where(t => t.Room == item.Room).FirstOrDefault();
  if (type == null)
  {
   db.EntityType.InsertOnSubmit(item);
  }
  else
  {
   type.Date = item.Date;
   type.LastUpdate = DateTime.Now();
   type.End = item.End;
  }       
 }
}

internal void Save()
{
 db.SubmitChanges();
}

Edit: just checked the ChangeSet, there are no updates only inserts. For now I've settled with

foreach (EntityType item in iEnumerable)
{
    EntityType type = db.EntityType.Where(t => t.Room == item.Room).FirstOrDefault();
    if (type != null)
    {
        db.Exams.DeleteOnSubmit(type);
    }
    db.EntityType.InsertOnSubmit(item);
}

but I'd love to do updates and lose these unnecessary delete statements.

share|improve this question
    
What is cur? It's not defined in the code you've attached. –  Mark Byers May 23 '10 at 19:55
    
Can you tell us what happened when you ran this code, and what you wanted to happen instead? –  Mark Byers May 23 '10 at 21:58
    
it inserts a new row - regardless if type == null or not and. Every row should reference to a different room. I'm writing a asp.net mvc website which displays the class (in school) that takes place in any given room. One class can only be in one room. If eg the instructor changes, I need to update the entity - which it doesn't. I end up with the old record intact and a new one with the correct information inserted. –  Christina Mayers May 23 '10 at 22:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, I worked out why it didn't work the way I anticipated it.

function Stuff()
{    
    Wrapper x = new Wrapper();
    Type a = new Type();
    InsertType(a);
    x.Type = a;
    InsertOnSubmit(x);
}

function InsertType (Type a)
{
    InsertOnSubmit(a);
}

since a in x is still the same a will be inserted a second time - it's still new. Somehow I thought that they were referenced and essentially the same.

I haven't thought about why it does work when I delete the old record first. Don't want to waste any more time on this. On to new worlds (EF4 or NHibernate)!

share|improve this answer

I wonder if you are experiencing issues due to the problem discussed here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/751776/why-cant-i-change-elements-from-a-linq-ienumerable-in-a-for-loop

One way to test it would be to pass in a List of EntityType instead of IEnumerable as such:

internal void StoreInformations(IList<EntityType> iEnumerable)
{
...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just tried, sadly it doesn't change anything (since I am not updating iEnumerable). I checked everythin else too, still no luck –  Christina Mayers May 23 '10 at 22:52
    
I guess I may have dismissed your answer a bit too soon. Since nothing was new I only saw three inserts. But I tried to force an update - I get for each insert an update - so the original value will be updated and a new one inserted... –  Christina Mayers May 24 '10 at 0:22
    
So have you made any progress or are you going to stick with the workaround you posted above? In my answer I was thinking that in the section you were doing the updating, item was being destroyed after the foreach loop and maybe that's why type wasn't being updated. Recently I've been bitten by issues with trying to do updates while working with IEnumerable<> and I resolved my issue by using IList<> in certain places. I'm new to Linq myself, but your issue looked somewhat similar, so I thought maybe using IList in place of IEnumerable might work. But I don't know enough to say why. –  John Allers May 24 '10 at 1:01
    
sorry I didn't comment any sooner, I ditched LinqToSql entirely - it's dead technology anyway. :) –  Christina Mayers Jun 1 '10 at 11:29

Wouldn't you want item.Room instead of iEnumerable.Room?

share|improve this answer
    
true and I edited the question accordingly since it doesn't solve the underlying problem –  Christina Mayers May 23 '10 at 22:16
    
This is really a comment, not an answer to the question. Please use "add comment" to leave feedback for the author. –  walther Aug 22 '12 at 9:11

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