Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

After some resent tests I have found my implementation cannot handle very much recursion. Although after I ran a few tests in Firefox I found that this may be more common than I originally thought. I believe the basic problem is that my implementation requires 3 calls to make a function call. The first call is made to a method named Call that makes sure the call is being made to a callable object and gets the value of any arguments that are references. The second call is made to a method named Call which is defined in the ICallable interface. This method creates the new execution context and builds the lambda expression if it has not been created. The final call is made to the lambda that the function object encapsulates. Clearly making a function call is quite heavy but I am sure that with a little bit of tweaking I can make recursion a viable tool when using this implementation.

public static object Call(ExecutionContext context, object value, object[] args)
{
    var func = Reference.GetValue(value) as ICallable;
    if (func == null)
    {
        throw new TypeException();
    }
    if (args != null && args.Length > 0)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < args.Length; i++)
        {
            args[i] = Reference.GetValue(args[i]);
        }
    }
    var reference = value as Reference;
    if (reference != null)
    {
        if (reference.IsProperty)
        {
            return func.Call(reference.Value, args);
        }
        else
        {
            return func.Call(((EnviromentRecord)reference.Value).ImplicitThisValue(), args);
        }
    }
    return func.Call(Undefined.Value, args);
}

public object Call(object thisObject, object[] arguments)
{
    var lexicalEnviroment = Scope.NewDeclarativeEnviroment();
    var variableEnviroment = Scope.NewDeclarativeEnviroment();
    var thisBinding = thisObject ?? Engine.GlobalEnviroment.GlobalObject;
    var newContext = new ExecutionContext(Engine, lexicalEnviroment, variableEnviroment, thisBinding);
    Engine.EnterContext(newContext);
    var result = Function.Value(newContext, arguments);
    Engine.LeaveContext();
    return result;
}
share|improve this question
    
I suppose transforming tail recursion to loops is out of the scope for now? That way you could avoid calling completely. –  Tamas Czinege May 23 '10 at 22:13
    
@DrJokepu - I've been keeping the idea of using tail recursion in the back of my mind but I also am looking for suggestions on how to make the calls themselves less heavy as a general performance improvement. Also I don't believe tail recursion can be implemented properly in cases where the complexity of the function is too great. –  ChaosPandion May 23 '10 at 22:34
    
Well it doesn't look like it's doing anything unnecessary, have you tried running it with a profiler? I mean, function calls (in Release mode) are not very expensive in CLR (unfortunately the second Call is a bit too fat to be inlined by the JIT) so I doubt that that's why it's heavy. Maybe something in Reference.GetValue() or something? A profiler would be definitely very helpful. –  Tamas Czinege May 23 '10 at 23:11
    
@DrJokepu - I've been using the profiler on a regular basis and Reference.GetValue does happen to be a heavy method. The problem is I don't know how to relate the data I read to improving resilience to stack overflows. –  ChaosPandion May 23 '10 at 23:56
    
@ChaosPandion: I suppose you could redesign things a bit. If I understand it correctly, your current approach replicates the execution path of the executed script; if the script makes a call, you make a call (ok, 3) etc. How about implementing it as a state machine instead? You got one loop, a few stacks (for scope, calls, etc.) and you keep on executing the thing on the top of the stack as long as it's not empty. This way, you could avoid duplicating the JavaScript stack (several times) in the CLR stack which is what you do now. I hope I was clear enough, let me now if that's not the case. –  Tamas Czinege May 24 '10 at 0:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I cannot believe how easy this was to get working. Basically in my compiler I check to see if the function is returning the result of calling itself. If so I instead return the arguments that are being passed. Then I simply grab any reference values and re-invoke the backing lambda. With this in place I was able to make millions of recursive calls.

I would like to thank DrJokepu for inspiring this solution.

public object Call(object thisObject, object[] arguments)
{
    var lexicalEnviroment = Scope.NewDeclarativeEnviroment();
    var variableEnviroment = Scope.NewDeclarativeEnviroment();
    var thisBinding = thisObject ?? Engine.GlobalEnviroment.GlobalObject;
    var newContext = new ExecutionContext(Engine, lexicalEnviroment, variableEnviroment, thisBinding);
    var result = default(object);
    var callArgs = default(object[]);

    Engine.EnterContext(newContext);
    while (true)
    {
        result = Function.Value(newContext, arguments);
        callArgs = result as object[];
        if (callArgs == null)
        {
            break;
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < callArgs.Length; i++)
        {
            callArgs[i] = Reference.GetValue(callArgs[i]);
        }
        arguments = callArgs;
    }
    Engine.LeaveContext();

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.