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Given a phone keypad as shown below:

1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9
  0

How many different 10-digit numbers can be formed starting from 1? The constraint is that the movement from 1 digit to the next is similar to the movement of the Knight in a chess game.

For eg. if we are at 1 then the next digit can be either 6 or 8 if we are at 6 then the next digit can be 1, 7 or 0.

Repetition of digits are allowed - 1616161616 is a valid number.

Is there a polynomial time algorithm which solves this problem? The problem requires us to just give the count of 10-digit numbers and not necessarily list the numbers.

EDIT: I tried modeling this as a graph with each digit having 2 or 3 digits as its neighbors. Then I used DFS to navigate upto the depth of 10 nodes and then increment the count of numbers each time I reached the depth of 10. This obviously is not polynomial time. Assuming each digit had just 2 neighbors, this would have required at least 2^10 iterations.

The variable here is the number of digits. I have taken the eg. of 10 digit numbers. It could as well be n-digits.

share|improve this question
6  
Homework? What have you tried so far? – Eric J. May 23 '10 at 21:12
    
@Eric J. how could this not be homework? ;) – catchmeifyoutry May 23 '10 at 21:14
2  
@srikfreak: If in fact this is homework, you will get best results if you give it that tag, and show what honest effort you have made and where you are stuck. Most people here don't want to do your homework for you, and you would not learn even if someone did. – Eric J. May 23 '10 at 21:17
1  
5 can never be reached, so it can be safely ignored for this particular problem without having any impact on the solution. – srikanta May 25 '10 at 6:49
2  
For those who want to check their solutions, the correct answer is 1424 – Sarp Centel Mar 7 '11 at 15:44

10 Answers 10

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Sure it can be done in polynomial time. It's an excellent exercise in dynamic programming or memoization.

Lets assume N (the number of digits) equals 10 for the example.

Think of it recursively like this: How many numbers can I construct using 10 digits starting from 1?

Answer is

[number of 9-digit numbers starting from 8] +
[number of 9-digit numbers starting from 6].

So how many "9-digit numbers starting from 8" are there? Well,

[number of 8-digit numbers starting from 1] +
[number of 8-digit numbers starting from 3]

and so on. Base case is reached when you get the question "How many 1-digit numbers are there starting from X" (and the answer is obviously 1).

When it comes to complexity, the key observation is that you reuse previously computed solutions. That is for instance, the answer to "how many 5-digit numbers starting from 3" there are, can be used both when answering "how many 6-digit numbers are there starting from 8" AND "how many 6-digit numbers are there starting from 4". This reuse make the complexity collapse from exponential to polynomial.

Let's take a closer look at the complexity of a dynamic programming solution:

Such implementation would fill in a matrix in the following way:

num[1][i] = 1, for all 0<=i<=9   -- there are one 1-digit number starting from X.

for digits = 2...N
    for from = 0...9
        num[digits][from] = num[digits-1][successor 1 of from] +
                            num[digits-1][successor 2 of from] +
                            ...
                            num[digits-1][successor K of from]

return num[N][1]                 -- number of N-digit numbers starting from 1.

The algorithm simply fills the matrix one cell at a time, and the matrix is of dimension 10*N, and thus runs in linear time.


Wrote it down from the top of my head, please correct me if there are any typos.

share|improve this answer
4  
+1, beautiful answer. – Hunter McMillen Apr 7 '14 at 23:44
    
Working solution (using Python3) with your algorithm at github.com/harishvc/challenges/blob/master/… . Could your explain further about the linear time complexity? – harishvc Mar 20 at 4:27

This can be done in O(log N). Consider the keypad and the possible moves on it as a graph G(V, E) where vertices are the available digits and edges say which digits can follow which. Now for each output position i we can form a vector Paths(i) containing the number of different paths each vertex can be reached in. Now it's pretty easy to see that for a given position i and digit v, the possible paths that it can be reached through is the sum of the different paths that possible preceding digits could be reached through, or Paths(i)[v] = sum(Paths(i-1)[v2] * (1 if (v,v2) in E else 0) for v2 in V ). Now, this is taking the sum of each position the preceding vector times a corresponding position in a column of the adjacency matrix. So we can simplify this as Paths(i) = Paths(i-1) · A, where A is the adjacency matrix of the graph. Getting rid of the recursion and taking advantage of associativity of matrix multiplication, this becomes Paths(i) = Paths(1) · A^(i-1). We know Paths(1): we have only one path, to the digit 1.

The total number of paths for an n digit number is the sum of the paths for each digit, so the final algorithm becomes: TotalPaths(n) = sum( [1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0] · A^(n-1) )

The exponentiation can be calculated via squaring in O(log(n)) time, given constant time multiplies, otherwise O(M(n) * log(n)) where M(n) is the complexity of your favorite arbitrary precision multiplication algorithm for n digit numbers.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice use of the adjacency matrix. But note that you consider N to be the length of the phone number, while in the question the complexity is in terms of the number of available digits. With that, you get O(n^2) for calculating A to its 10th power. – Tomer Vromen May 29 '10 at 22:09
1  
No, I think N should be the length of the phone number. How should the key-pad look for a larger number of digits? – aioobe May 29 '10 at 22:48
    
The complexity for arbitrarily sized keypad with arbitrary moves would be based on naive sparse matrix multiplication O(dmlog n), where d is the number of digits and m is the total number of possible moves (m <= d^2). A grid based keypad would have O(d) possible moves, so yes if the question was in terms of keypad size, then this algorithm would be quadratic. – Ants Aasma May 31 '10 at 13:55
    
Actually, this solution can run in constant time with respect to N. Since A is symmetric, it can be diagonalized, and then taking A^N becomes a matter of taking 10 real numbers to the Nth power which can be assumed to be constant time, and performing some other operations independent of N. – Nir Friedman Dec 27 '15 at 22:02

Run time constant time solution:

#include <iostream>

constexpr int notValid(int x, int y) {
return !(( 1 == x && 3 == y ) || //zero on bottom.
         ( 0 <= x && 3 > x && //1-9
           0 <= y && 3 > y ));
}

class Knight {
    template<unsigned N > constexpr int move(int x, int y) {
        return notValid(x,y)? 0 : jump<N-1>(x,y);
    }

    template<unsigned N> constexpr int jump( int x, int y ) {
        return  move<N>(x+1, y-2) +
            move<N>(x-1, y-2) +
            move<N>(x+1, y+2) +
            move<N>(x-1, y+2) +
            move<N>(x+2, y+1) +
            move<N>(x-2, y+1) +
            move<N>(x+2, y-1) +
            move<N>(x-2, y-1);
    }

public:
    template<unsigned N> constexpr int count() {
        return move<N-1>(0,1) + move<N-1>(0,2) +
            move<N-1>(1,0) + move<N-1>(1,1) + move<N-1>(1,2) +
            move<N-1>(2,0) + move<N-1>(2,1) + move<N-1>(2,2);
    }
};

template<> constexpr int Knight::move<0>(int x, int y) { return notValid(x,y)? 0 : 1; }
template<> constexpr int Knight::count<0>() { return 0; } //terminal cases.
template<> constexpr int Knight::count<1>() { return 8; }


int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    static_assert( ( 16 == Knight().count<2>() ), "Fail on test with 2 lenght" );  // prof of performance
    static_assert( ( 35 == Knight().count<3>() ), "Fail on test with 3 lenght" );

    std::cout<< "Number of valid Knight phones numbers:" << Knight().count<10>() << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well, if you put the number of digits (10) in the code directly, you can just as well do std::cout << 1424 << std::endl; right away. :-) (I assume this solution doesn't work if you read N from stdin.) – aioobe Apr 4 at 20:51
    
@aioobe It suppose to work if you gave that N to compiler stdin :) – VladimirS Apr 4 at 23:08

I decided to tackle this problem and make it as extensible as I can. This solution allows you to:

Define your own board (phone pad, chess board, etc.)

Define your own chess piece (Knight, Rook, Bishop, etc.); you will have to write the concrete class and generate it from the factory.

Retrieve several pieces of information through some useful utility methods.

The classes are as follows:

PadNumber: Class defining a button on the phone pad. Could be renamed to 'Square' to represent a board square.

ChessPiece: Abstract class that defines fields for all chess pieces.

Movement: Interface that defines movement methods and allows for factory generation of pieces.

PieceFactory: Factory class to generate Chess pieces.

Knight: Concrete class that inherits from ChessPiece and implements Movement

PhoneChess: Entrance class.

Driver: Driver code.

OK, here's the code :)

package PhoneChess;

import java.awt.Point;

public class PadNumber {

private String number = "";
private Point coordinates = null;

public PadNumber(String number, Point coordinates)
{
    if(number != null && number.isEmpty()==false)
        this.number = number;
    else
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Input cannot be null or empty.");

    if(coordinates == null || coordinates.x < 0 || coordinates.y < 0)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException();
    else
        this.coordinates = coordinates;

}

public String getNumber()
{
    return this.number;
}
public Integer getNumberAsNumber()
{
    return Integer.parseInt(this.number);
}

public Point getCoordinates()
{
    return this.coordinates;
}
public int getX()
{
    return this.coordinates.x;
}
public int getY()
{
    return this.coordinates.y;
}

}

ChessPiece

package PhoneChess;

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.List;

public abstract class ChessPiece implements Movement {

protected String name = "";
protected HashMap<PadNumber, List<PadNumber>> moves = null;
protected Integer fullNumbers = 0;
protected int[] movesFrom = null;
protected PadNumber[][] thePad = null;
}

Movement Interface:

package PhoneChess;

import java.util.List;

public interface Movement 
{
public Integer findNumbers(PadNumber start, Integer digits);
public abstract boolean canMove(PadNumber from, PadNumber to);
public List<PadNumber> allowedMoves(PadNumber from);
public Integer countAllowedMoves(PadNumber from);
}

PieceFactory

package PhoneChess;

public class PieceFactory 
{
    public ChessPiece getPiece(String piece, PadNumber[][] thePad)
    {
    if(thePad == null || thePad.length == 0 || thePad[0].length == 0)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid pad");
    if(piece == null)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid chess piece");

    if(piece.equalsIgnoreCase("Knight"))
        return new Knight("Knight", thePad);
    else
        return null;
}
}

Knight class

package PhoneChess;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.List;

public final class Knight extends ChessPiece implements Movement {

/**Knight movements
 * One horizontal, followed by two vertical
 * Or 
 * One vertical, followed by two horizontal
 * @param name
 */

public Knight(String name, PadNumber[][] thePad)
{
    if(name == null || name.isEmpty() == true)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Name cannot be null or empty");

    this.name = name;
    this.thePad = thePad;
    this.moves = new HashMap<>();
}


private Integer fullNumbers = null;

@Override
public Integer findNumbers(PadNumber start, Integer digits) 
{
    if(start == null || "*".equals(start.getNumber()) || "#".equals(start.getNumber()) ) { throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid start point"); }
    if(start.getNumberAsNumber() == 5) { return 0; } //Consider adding an 'allowSpecialChars' condition
    if(digits == 1) { return 1; };

    //Init
    this.movesFrom = new int[thePad.length * thePad[0].length];
    for(int i = 0; i < this.movesFrom.length; i++)
        this.movesFrom[i] = -1;

    fullNumbers = 0;
    findNumbers(start, digits, 1);      
    return fullNumbers;
}

private void findNumbers(PadNumber start, Integer digits, Integer currentDigits)
{
    //Base condition
    if(currentDigits == digits)
    {
        //Reset
        currentDigits = 1; 
        fullNumbers++; 
        return; 
    }
    if(!this.moves.containsKey(start))
        allowedMoves(start);

    List<PadNumber> options = this.moves.get(start);
    if(options != null)
    {
        currentDigits++; //More digits to be got
        for(PadNumber option : options)
            findNumbers(option, digits, currentDigits);
    }
}

@Override
public boolean canMove(PadNumber from, PadNumber to) 
{
    //Is the moves list available?
    if(!this.moves.containsKey(from.getNumber()))
    {
        //No? Process.
        allowedMoves(from);
    }
    if(this.moves.get(from) != null)
    {
        for(PadNumber option : this.moves.get(from))
        {
            if(option.getNumber().equals(to.getNumber()))
                return true;
        }
    }
    return false;

}

/***
 * Overriden method that defines each Piece's movement restrictions.
 */
@Override
public List<PadNumber> allowedMoves(PadNumber from) 
{
    //First encounter
    if(this.moves == null)
        this.moves = new HashMap<>();


    if(this.moves.containsKey(from))
        return this.moves.get(from);
    else
    {
        List<PadNumber> found = new ArrayList<>();
        int row = from.getY();//rows
        int col = from.getX();//columns

        //Cases:
        //1. One horizontal move each way followed by two vertical moves each way
        if(col-1 >= 0 && row-2 >= 0)//valid
        {
            if(thePad[row-2][col-1].getNumber().equals("*") == false && 
                    thePad[row-2][col-1].getNumber().equals("#") == false)
            {
                found.add(thePad[row-2][col-1]);
                this.movesFrom[from.getNumberAsNumber()] = this.movesFrom[from.getNumberAsNumber()] + 1;
            }

        }
        if(col-1 >= 0 && row+2 < thePad.length)//valid
        {
            if(thePad[row+2][col-1].getNumber().equals("*") == false && 
                    thePad[row+2][col-1].getNumber().equals("#") == false)
            {
                found.add(thePad[row+2][col-1]);
                this.movesFrom[from.getNumberAsNumber()] = this.movesFrom[from.getNumberAsNumber()] + 1;
            }
        }
        if(col+1 < thePad[0].length && row+2 < thePad.length)//valid
        {
            if(thePad[row+2][col+1].getNumber().equals("*") == false && 
                    thePad[row+2][col+1].getNumber().equals("#") == false)
            {
                found.add(thePad[row+2][col+1]);
                this.movesFrom[from.getNumberAsNumber()] = this.movesFrom[from.getNumberAsNumber()] + 1;
            }
        }
        if(col+1 < thePad[0].length && row-2 >= 0)//valid
        {
            if(thePad[row-2][col+1].getNumber().equals("*") == false && 
                    thePad[row-2][col+1].getNumber().equals("#") == false)
            found.add(thePad[row-2][col+1]);
        }
        //Case 2. One vertical move each way follow by two horizontal moves each way

        if(col-2 >= 0 && row-1 >= 0)
        {
            if(thePad[row-1][col-2].getNumber().equals("*") == false && 
                    thePad[row-1][col-2].getNumber().equals("#") == false)
            found.add(thePad[row-1][col-2]);
        }
        if(col-2 >= 0 && row+1 < thePad.length)
        {
            if(thePad[row+1][col-2].getNumber().equals("*") == false && 
                    thePad[row+1][col-2].getNumber().equals("#") == false)
            found.add(thePad[row+1][col-2]);
        }

        if(col+2 < thePad[0].length && row-1 >= 0)
        {
            if(thePad[row-1][col+2].getNumber().equals("*") == false && 
                    thePad[row-1][col+2].getNumber().equals("#") == false)
            found.add(thePad[row-1][col+2]);
        }
        if(col+2 < thePad[0].length && row+1 < thePad.length)
        {
            if(thePad[row+1][col+2].getNumber().equals("*") == false && 
                    thePad[row+1][col+2].getNumber().equals("#") == false)
            found.add(thePad[row+1][col+2]);
        }

        if(found.size() > 0)
        {
            this.moves.put(from, found);
            this.movesFrom[from.getNumberAsNumber()] = found.size();
        }
        else
        {
            this.moves.put(from, null); //for example the Knight cannot move from 5 to anywhere
            this.movesFrom[from.getNumberAsNumber()] = 0;
        }
    }

    return this.moves.get(from);


}

@Override
public Integer countAllowedMoves(PadNumber from) 
{
    int start = from.getNumberAsNumber();

    if(movesFrom[start] != -1)
        return movesFrom[start];
    else
    {
        movesFrom[start] = allowedMoves(from).size();
    }
    return movesFrom[start];
}

@Override
public String toString()
{
    return this.name;
}

}

PhoneChess entrant class

package PhoneChess;


public final class PhoneChess 
{
private ChessPiece thePiece = null;
private PieceFactory factory = null;

public ChessPiece ThePiece()
{
    return this.thePiece;
}

public PhoneChess(PadNumber[][] thePad, String piece)
{
    if(thePad == null || thePad.length == 0 || thePad[0].length == 0)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid pad");
    if(piece == null)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid chess piece");

    this.factory = new PieceFactory();
    this.thePiece = this.factory.getPiece(piece, thePad);
}

public Integer findPossibleDigits(PadNumber start, Integer digits)
{
    if(digits <= 0)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Digits cannot be less than or equal to zero");

    return thePiece.findNumbers(start, digits);
}

public boolean isValidMove(PadNumber from, PadNumber to)
{
    return this.thePiece.canMove(from, to);
}

}

Driver Code:

public static void main(String[] args) {


    PadNumber[][] thePad = new PadNumber[4][3];
    thePad[0][0] = new PadNumber("1", new Point(0,0));
    thePad[0][1] = new PadNumber("2", new Point(1,0));
    thePad[0][2] = new PadNumber("3",new Point(2,0));
    thePad[1][0] = new PadNumber("4",new Point(0,1));
    thePad[1][1] = new PadNumber("5",new Point(1,1));
    thePad[1][2] = new PadNumber("6", new Point(2,1));
    thePad[2][0] = new PadNumber("7", new Point(0,2));
    thePad[2][1] = new PadNumber("8", new Point(1,2));
    thePad[2][2] = new PadNumber("9", new Point(2,2));
    thePad[3][0] = new PadNumber("*", new Point(0,3));
    thePad[3][1] = new PadNumber("0", new Point(1,3));
    thePad[3][2] = new PadNumber("#", new Point(2,3));

    PhoneChess phoneChess = new PhoneChess(thePad, "Knight");
    System.out.println(phoneChess.findPossibleDigits(thePad[0][1],4));
}

}
share|improve this answer

Method returns list of 10 digit numbers starting with 1. Again the count is 1424.

  public ArrayList<String> getList(int digit, int length, String base ){
    ArrayList<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
    if(length == 1){
        list.add(base);
        return list;
    }
    ArrayList<String> temp;

    for(int i : b[digit]){
        String newBase = base +i;
        list.addAll(getList(i, length -1, newBase ));
    }
    return list;
}
share|improve this answer

A simpler answer.

#include<stdio.h>

int a[10] = {2,2,2,2,3,0,3,2,2,2};
int b[10][3] = {{4,6},{6,8},{7,9},{4,8},{0,3,9},{},{1,7,0},{2,6},{1,3},{2,4}};

int count(int curr,int n)
{
    int sum = 0;
    if(n==10)
        return 1;
    else
    {
        int i = 0;
        int val = 0;
        for(i = 0; i < a[curr]; i++)
        {
            val = count(b[curr][i],n+1);
            sum += val;
        }
        return sum;
    }
}

int main()
{
    int n = 1;
    int val = count(1,0);
    printf("%d\n",val);
}

celebrate!!

share|improve this answer
    
But this is exponential time, right? You don't do any DP or memoization... – aioobe May 29 '10 at 22:55
    
Shouldn't n==10 be 9 instead, since you have to start with 1 as the first digit, and only need 9 more digits to reach a 10 digit number? – Sarp Centel Mar 7 '11 at 15:05

This problem may be also modelled as a Constraint satisfaction problem (aka CSP for short).

I suggest to use the Minion solver (fast and scalable) that you can find here.

Modelling maybe tedious and time consumming (steep learning curve).

Instead of using Minion language input, my advice is to formulate the model with solver independent modelling language such as ESSENCE and find a converter accordingly.

share|improve this answer
//Both the iterative and recursive with memorize shows count as 1424 for 10 digit numbers starting with 1. 
int[][] b = {{4,6},{6,8},{7,9},{4,8},{0,3,9},{},{1,7,0},{2,6},{1,3},{2,4}};
public int countIterative(int digit, int length) {
    int[][] matrix = new int[length][10];
    for(int dig =0; dig <=9; dig++){
          matrix[0][dig] = 1;
    }
    for(int len = 1; len < length; len++){
        for(int dig =0; dig <=9; dig++){
          int sum = 0;
          for(int i : b[dig]){
            sum += matrix[len-1][i];
          }
          matrix[len][dig] = sum;
        }
    }
    return matrix[length-1][digit];
}

public int count(int index, int length, int[][] matrix ){
    int sum = 0;
    if(matrix[length-1][index] > 0){
        System.out.println("getting value from memoize:"+index + "length:"+ length);
        return matrix[length-1][index];
    }
    if( length == 1){
        return 1;
    }
    for(int i: b[index] )  {
         sum += count(i, length-1,matrix);
    }
    matrix[length-1][index] = sum;
    return sum;
}
share|improve this answer

I'm not sure if I missed something, but reading the description of the problem I came to this solution. It has O(n) time complexity and O(1) space complexity.

I figured that number 1 is at a corner, right? In each corner you can either move to one of the sides (4 from 9 and 3, or 6 from 7 an 1) or one of the 'vertical' sides (8 from 3 and 1, or 2 from 9 and 7). So, corners add two moves: a side move and a 'vertical' move. This is true for all four corners (1,3,9,7).

From each side, you can either move to two corners (7 and 1 from 6, 9 and 3 from 4) or you can reach the bottom key (0). That's three moves. Two corners and one bottom.

On the bottom key (0), you can move to both sides (4 and 6). So, in each step, you check out all possible endings for the path of the previous length (that is, how many ended on a corner, a side, a 'vertical' or the 'bottom' zero key) and then generate new ending counts according to the generation rules stated before.

  • Each corner ending adds a side and a vertical.
  • Each side ending adds 2 corners and a bottom.
  • Each vertical ending adds 2 corners.
  • Each bottom ending adds 2 sides.

generating possibilities from previous steps

If you start from the '1' key, you start with one possible corner solution, in each step you count the number of corner, side, vertical and bottom endings of the previous step and then apply the rules to generate the next count.

In plain javascript code.

function paths(n) {
    //Index to 0
    var corners = 1;
    var verticals = 0;
    var bottom = 0;
    var sides = 0;

    if (n <= 0) {
        //No moves possible for paths without length 
        return 0;
    }

    for (var i = 1; i < n; i++) {
        var previousCorners = corners;
        var previousVerticals = verticals;
        var previousBottom = bottom;
        var previousSides = sides;

        sides = 1 * previousCorners + 2 * previousBottom;
        verticals = 1 * previousCorners;
        bottom = 1 * previousSides;
        corners = 2 * previousSides + 2 * previousVerticals;
        //console.log("Moves: %d, Length: %d, Sides: %d, Verticals: %d, Bottom: %d, Corners: %d, Total: %d", i, i + 1, sides, verticals, bottom, corners, sides+verticals+bottom+corners);  
    }

    return sides + verticals + bottom + corners;

}

for (var i = 0; i <= 10; i++) {
    console.log(paths(i));  
}
share|improve this answer

Recursive function in Java:

public static int countPhoneNumbers (int n, int r, int c) {
        if (outOfBounds(r,c)) {
            return 0;
        } else {
            char button = buttons[r][c];
            if (button  == '.') {
                // visited
                return 0;
            }  else {
                buttons[r][c] = '.'; // record this position so don't revisit.
                // Count all possible phone numbers with one less digit starting
                int result=0;
                result = countPhoneNumbers(n-1,r-2,c-1)
                                         + countPhoneNumbers(n-1,r-2,c+1)
                                         + countPhoneNumbers(n-1,r+2,c-1)
                                         + countPhoneNumbers(n-1,r+2,c+1)
                                         + countPhoneNumbers(n-1,r-1,c-2)
                                         + countPhoneNumbers(n-1,r-1,c+2)
                                         + countPhoneNumbers(n-1,r+1,c-2)
                                         + countPhoneNumbers(n-1,r+1,c+2);
                }
                buttons[r][c] = button; // Remove record from position.
                return result; 
            }
        }
    }
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