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I know 'this' can be a problem when you don't understand Javascript well but this one got me a little puzzled.

var ControlTypes = {
    TextBox: function () {
        console.log(this);
        this.Name = "TextBox";
        console.log(this);
    }
}

ControlTypes.TextBox();

Firebug gives the following result:

Object {}
Object { Name="TextBox"}

The first object is ControlTypes and the second one is Textbox. Could anybody explain the behavior behind this?

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up vote 4 down vote accepted
var ControlTypes = {
    TextBox: function () {
        console.log(this);
        this.Name = "TextBox";
        console.log(this);
    }
}

ControlTypes.TextBox();

You define a variable ControlTypes by a JavaScript Object Literal.

A member function is defined of named TextBox.

You have an object, with a member function. When that member function uses the "this" keyword, it is pointing to the container of the member function, your object "ControlTypes".

When you console.log this for the first time, no member variable where typeof(variable) != "function" has been defined...

Then, you define a member variable "Name", so the next time you call console.log, Name has been defined.


By the way,
Are you attempting to instantiate a ControlTypes.TextBox object?
Currently you are running the TextBox function in the context of ControlTypes, not in a new object.

I think you meant new ControlTypes.TextBox();

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2  
It's a JavaScript object literal, not JSON. Among other things, JSON doesn't allow functions. – Matthew Flaschen May 23 '10 at 23:59
    
Yeah, I have both in my code to see the results and I think I also confused myself while doing this. – Pickels May 24 '10 at 0:01
    
@Matthew, nice catch, fixed it. @Pickels, I didn't understand what you meant just now. – Warty May 24 '10 at 0:03
    
Ah sorry, I meant that in my original code I do instantiate the object but because the result was confusing me I also tried it without new. – Pickels May 24 '10 at 0:07
    
I'll mark this as the answer. The comment you made about "new" gave me a few new insights. Wonder if I should give my question a different title now because it's somewhat wrong. Anyway thanks for the answer. – Pickels May 24 '10 at 0:11

The output of console.log is different between the calls because you change it between the calls. Simple as that.

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