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I couldn't find a working example of the method [NSDictionary getObjects:andKeys:]. The only example I could find, doesn't compile. I provided the errors/warnings here in case someone is searching for them.

The reason I was confused is because most methods on NSDictionary return an NSArray. However, in the documentation it states that the out variables of this method are returned as C arrays.

Here are the error messages/warnings you might get if you follow the linked example:

NSDictionary *myDictionary = ...;

id objects[]; // Error: Array size missing in 'objects'
id keys[]; // Error: Array size missing in 'keys'

[myDictionary getObjects:&objects andKeys:&keys];

for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
  id obj = objects[i];
  id key = keys[i];
}

.

NSDictionary *myDictionary = ...;

NSInteger count = [myDictionary count];
id objects[count];
id keys[count];
[myDictionary getObjects:&objects andKeys:&keys]; // Warning: Passing argument 1 of 'getObjects:andKeys:' from incompatible pointer type.

for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
  id obj = objects[i];
  id key = keys[i];
}

I'll provide a working solution as an answer to this question.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Here's the correct way to use this method:

NSDictionary *myDictionary = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:@"1", @"A", @"2", @"B", nil];

NSInteger count = [myDictionary count];
id objects[count];
id keys[count];
[myDictionary getObjects:objects andKeys:keys];

for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
  id obj = objects[i];
  id key = keys[i];
  NSLog(@"%@ -> %@", obj, key);
}
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do i need to release obj and key ? –  Cesar Sep 3 '10 at 0:59
    
Do not release anything in the code example above. –  Graeme Wicksted Mar 24 '11 at 19:29
    
Just in case anyones wondering why you dont need to release anything (this was a thing that killed me in early development) it's because nothing was alloc'd. No memory allocated = no memory needed to be released. Obvious but if i'd seen this a few months ago i'd have no idea why you wouldn't use release :) –  Elmo Jul 25 '11 at 10:07
    
With ARC on this code generates "Sending '__strong id *' to parameter of type '__unsafe_unretained id *' changes retain/release properties of pointer. –  Dennis Burton Mar 19 '12 at 17:08

Under ARC the solution needs to be modified as follows (__unsafe_unretained added to the array definitions):

NSDictionary *myDictionary = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:@"1", @"A", @"2", @"B", nil];

NSInteger count = [myDictionary count];
id __unsafe_unretained objects[count];
id __unsafe_unretained keys[count];
[myDictionary getObjects:objects andKeys:keys];

for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
  id obj = objects[i];
  id key = keys[i];
  NSLog(@"%@ -> %@", obj, key);
}
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