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I have the following:

Class 1 (Text, State, Level)
Class 2 (Text, State, Level, Ident)

Is there a way for me to cast an object of Class 2 into into Class 1, and not having to do the usual cast code (Text = c.Text, State = c.State etc.)? Possibly by identifying the property names of each class and copying the value over?

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Can you be more specific regarding the relationship between Class 1 and Class 2? Are they related at all? –  Jon Limjap May 24 '10 at 5:41
    
Yes, they are related, but the relationship is slightly more complex. Class 1 is LINQ generated from a table, Class 2 is also LINQ generated, but the return type of a full text function, so it has all the fields of Class 1, and in addition the fields "Key" and "Rank". –  Alex May 24 '10 at 5:54

4 Answers 4

Why not derive Class 2 from Class 1, or have a common base class?

e.g.

class Class1 
{ 
   string Text;
   string State; 
   int    Level; 
} 

class Class2 : Class1 
{ 
   int Ident;
   // ...
}

A Class 2 instance can now be used everywhere a Class 1 instance is required.

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Could you elaborate a bit? How would this help/how would I achieve what I need by doing this? Thank you! –  Alex May 24 '10 at 4:50
    
+1, Inheritance is a perfect solution (on the face of it) –  Alastair Pitts May 24 '10 at 5:34

It might be overkill for your specific problem, but Automapper can help with this problem.

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I immediately thought of AutoMapper when I read this question. –  Alastair Pitts May 24 '10 at 5:34

Here is a very simple example without any error checking, it simply uses reflection to iterate over the properties of the source object and set the value of the destination object only if the types match.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var bar = new Bar();
        var foo = new Foo {A = 10, B = "Hello World"};

        foo.CopyTo(bar);

        Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1}", bar.A, bar.B);
    }
}

public static class Extensions
{
    public static void CopyTo(this object source, object destination)
    {
        var sourceType = source.GetType();
        var destinationType = destination.GetType();

        const BindingFlags flags = BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance;

        var properties = sourceType.GetProperties(flags);
        foreach (var sourceProperty in properties)
        {
            var destinationProperty = destinationType.GetProperty(sourceProperty.Name, flags);
            if (destinationProperty.PropertyType.Equals(sourceProperty.PropertyType))
            {
                destinationProperty.SetValue(destination, sourceProperty.GetValue(source, null), null);
            }
        }
    }
}
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This is nice.... is there a performance penalty for using Reflection? –  Alex May 24 '10 at 4:51
    
Defiantly, using reflection to get and set property values is considerably slower. There are plenty of interesting discussions on reflection. If you were really keen, you could create an expression and cache its result for later use.. or just use Automapper –  Rohan West May 24 '10 at 4:56
1  
.NET 2.0 onwards caches MemberInfo automatically. If you're using a lot of reflection the performance hit is not that bad. Obviously it's slower than not using reflection but its not this super-evil everyone thinks it is. msdn.microsoft.com/en-au/magazine/cc163759.aspx#S7 –  cottsak May 24 '10 at 5:03
    
@cottsak Good to know! –  Rohan West May 24 '10 at 5:11
    
To me this seems like a classic case of the overuse of reflection. –  Mitch Wheat May 24 '10 at 5:31

Maybe the problem is more complicated than the question. If not, have you tried inheritance?

class Class1
{
  //Text, State, Level
}

class Class2 : Class1
{
  //Indent
} 

Since Class2 inherits from class 1, you can pass it around as Class1 no casting needed. This works for example:

Class1 obj = new Class2();
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