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In Java the floating point arithmetic is not represented precisely. For example following snippet of code

            float a = 1.2; 
            float b= 3.0;
            float c = a * b; 
            if(c == 3.6){
              System.out.println("c is 3.6");
            } else {
                System.out.println("c is not 3.6");
            } 

actually prints "c is not 3.6".

I'm not interested in precision beyond 3 decimals (#.###). How can I deal with this problem to multiply floats and compare them reliably?

Thanks much

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Declare floats like: float a = 1.2f; and doubles like double d = 1.2d; Also in your if-statement: if(c == 3.6f) –  Martijn Courteaux May 24 '10 at 10:39
1  
As addition to @bobah 's answer, I recommend to look at the Math.ulp() function. –  aeracode Mar 25 '12 at 10:32
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7 Answers

It's a general rule that floating point number should never be compared like (a==b), but rather like (abs(a-b) < delta) where delta is a small number.

A floating point value having fixed number of digits in decimal form does not necessary have fixed number of digits in binary form.

Addition for clarity:

Though strict == comparison of floating point numbers has very little practical sense, the strict < and > comparison, on the contrary, is a valid use case (example - logic triggering when certain value exceeds threshold: (val > threshold) && panic();)

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Recommending comparing using a tolerance is inappropriate advice because it decreases false reports of inequality at the expense of increasing false reports of equality, and you cannot know whether that is acceptable to an application you know nothing about. The application might be “more interested” in seeking inequality than seeking equality or might have other specifications it needs to meet. –  Eric Postpischil Jul 30 '13 at 0:36
    
@Eric - When working with floating point numbers there is no notion of identity or inequity, there is only a notion of distance. If in the formula I gave in the answer you replace < with > you will get a criteria for comparing floating point numbers for inequity in terms of distance. Bitwise identity of floating point numbers' representation in the computer memory is of no interest for most practical applications –  bobah Jul 30 '13 at 7:38
    
This is not about the bits representing a number; it is about their values. Floating-point arithmetic does have equality. The IEEE 754 standard defines floating-point objects to represent specific numbers exactly, not to represent intervals. –  Eric Postpischil Jul 30 '13 at 13:04
    
And a real life example is? –  bobah Jul 30 '13 at 13:18
1  
Regardless of any examples, there is a fundamental problem in advising people to compare using a tolerance. It increases false reports of equality, and, because you do not know the application, you cannot know whether this is acceptable or is a problem. –  Eric Postpischil Jul 30 '13 at 17:06
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If you are interested in fixed precision numbers, you should be using a fixed precision type like BigDecimal, not an inherently approximate (though high precision) type like float. There are numerous similar questions on Stack Overflow that go into this in more detail, across many languages.

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I think it has nothing to do with Java, it happens on any IEEE 754 floating point number. It is because of the nature of floating point representation. Any languages that use the IEEE 754 format will encounter the same problem.

As suggested by David above, you should use the method abs of java.lang.Math class to get the absolute value (drop the positive/negative sign).

You can read this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_754_revision and also a good numerical methods text book will address the problem sufficiently.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    float a = 1.2f;
    float b = 3.0f;
    float c = a * b;
        final float PRECISION_LEVEL = 0.001f;
    if(Math.abs(c - 3.6f) < PRECISION_LEVEL) {
        System.out.println("c is 3.6");
    } else {
        System.out.println("c is not 3.6");
    }
}
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This is a weakness of all floating point representations, and it happens because some numbers that appear to have a fixed number of decimals in the decimal system, actually have an infinite number of decimals in the binary system. And so what you think is 1.2 is actually something like 1.199999999997 because when representing it in binary it has to chop off the decimals after a certain number, and you lose some precision. Then multiplying it by 3 actually gives 3.5999999...

http://docs.python.org/py3k/tutorial/floatingpoint.html <- this might explain it better (even if it's for python, it's a common problem of the floating point representation)

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+1 - all finite precision floating number systems suffer from this problem. Not matter what base you choose, some rationals cannot be represented exactly. –  Stephen C May 24 '10 at 10:38
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Like the others wrote:

Compare floats with: if (Math.abs(a - b) < delta)

You can write a nice method for doing this:

public static int compareFloats(float f1, float f2, float delta)
{
    if (Math.abs(f1 - f2) < delta)
    {
         return 0;
    } else
    {
        if (f1 < f2)
        {
            return -1;
        } else {
            return 1;
        }
    }
}

/**
 * Uses <code>0.001f</code> for delta.
 */
public static int compareFloats(float f1, float f2)
{
     return compareFloats(f1, f2, 0.001f);
}

So, you can use it like this:

if (compareFloats(a * b, 3.6f) == 0)
{
    System.out.println("They are equal");
}
else
{
    System.out.println("They aren't equal");
}
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I’m using this bit of code in unit tests to compare if the outcome of 2 different calculations are the same, barring floating point math errors.

It works by looking at the binary representation of the floating point number. Most of the complication is due to the fact that the sign of floating point numbers is not two’s complement. After compensating for that it basically comes down to just a simple subtraction to get the difference in ULPs (explained in the comment below).

/**
 * Compare two floating points for equality within a margin of error.
 * 
 * This can be used to compensate for inequality caused by accumulated
 * floating point math errors.
 * 
 * The error margin is specified in ULPs (units of least precision).
 * A one-ULP difference means there are no representable floats in between.
 * E.g. 0f and 1.4e-45f are one ULP apart. So are -6.1340704f and -6.13407f.
 * Depending on the number of calculations involved, typically a margin of
 * 1-5 ULPs should be enough.
 * 
 * @param expected The expected value.
 * @param actual The actual value.
 * @param maxUlps The maximum difference in ULPs.
 */
public static void compareFloatEquals(float expected, float actual, int maxUlps) {
    int expectedBits = Float.floatToIntBits(expected) < 0 ? 0x80000000 - Float.floatToIntBits(expected) : Float.floatToIntBits(expected);
    int actualBits = Float.floatToIntBits(actual) < 0 ? 0x80000000 - Float.floatToIntBits(actual) : Float.floatToIntBits(actual);
    int difference = expectedBits > actualBits ? expectedBits - actualBits : actualBits - expectedBits;

    return !Float.isNaN(expected) && !Float.isNaN(actual) && difference <= maxUlps;
}

Here is a version for double precision floats:

/**
 * Compare two double precision floats for equality within a margin of error.
 * 
 * @param expected The expected value.
 * @param actual The actual value.
 * @param maxUlps The maximum difference in ULPs.
 * @see Utils#compareFloatEquals(float, float, int)
 */
public static void compareDoubleEquals(double expected, double actual, long maxUlps) {
    long expectedBits = Double.doubleToLongBits(expected) < 0 ? 0x8000000000000000L - Double.doubleToLongBits(expected) : Double.doubleToLongBits(expected);
    long actualBits = Double.doubleToLongBits(actual) < 0 ? 0x8000000000000000L - Double.doubleToLongBits(actual) : Double.doubleToLongBits(actual);
    long difference = expectedBits > actualBits ? expectedBits - actualBits : actualBits - expectedBits;

    return !Double.isNaN(expected) && !Double.isNaN(actual) && difference <= maxUlps;
}
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To compare two floats, f1 and f2 within precision of #.### I believe you would need to do like this:

((int) (f1 * 1000 + 0.5)) == ((int) (f2 * 1000 + 0.5))

f1 * 1000 lifts 3.14159265... to 3141.59265, + 0.5 results in 3142.09265 and the (int) chops off the decimals, 3142. That is, it includes 3 decimals and rounds the last digit properly.

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Comparing using an epsilon is better: consider what happens if f1 == 3.1414999999999 and f2 == 3.1415000000001. –  Mark Dickinson May 25 '10 at 8:41
    
Shit. I though I had it :-) sure. I agree with you. Comparing using an epsilon is much better. But does it accurately compare two floats of to its 3 first decimals? –  aioobe May 25 '10 at 8:52
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