Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When interviewing new candidates, we usually ask them to write a piece of C code to count the number of bits with value 1 in a given byte variable (e.g. the byte 3 has two 1-bits). I know all the common answers, such as right shifting eight times, or indexing constant table of 256 precomputed results.

But, is there a smarter way without using the precomputed table? What is the shortest combination of byte operations (AND, OR, XOR, +, -, binary negation, left and right shift) which computes the number of 1-bits?

share|improve this question
    

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are at least two faster solutions, with different performance characteristics:

  1. Subtract one and AND the new and old values. Repeat until zero. Count the number of iterations. Complexity: O(B), where B is the number of one-bits.

    int bits(unsigned n)
    {
        for (int i = 0; n; ++i)
        {
            n &= n - 1;
        }
        return i;
    }
    
  2. Add pairs of bits then groups of four, then groups of eight, till you reach the word size. There's a trick that lets you add all groups at each level in a single pass. Complexity: O(log(N)), where N is the total number of bits.

    int bits(uint32 n)
    {
        n = (n & 0x55555555) + ((n >>  1) & 0x55555555);
        n = (n & 0x33333333) + ((n >>  2) & 0x33333333);
        n = (n & 0x0f0f0f0f) + ((n >>  4) & 0x0f0f0f0f);
        n = (n & 0x00ff00ff) + ((n >>  8) & 0x00ff00ff);
        n = (n & 0x0000ffff) + (n >> 16);
        return n;
    }
    

    This version is a bit naive. If you think about it a bit, you can avoid some of the operations.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think that the first one should return i not n. –  danatel May 24 '10 at 11:31
    
+1 @danatel. Thanks for spotting that one. –  Marcelo Cantos May 24 '10 at 12:12

Here is a list of ways Bit twiddling hacks

share|improve this answer

Java does it this way (using 32-bit integers) (14 calculations)

public static int bitCount(int i) {
    // HD, Figure 5-2
    i = i - ((i >>> 1) & 0x55555555);
    i = (i & 0x33333333) + ((i >>> 2) & 0x33333333);
    i = (i + (i >>> 4)) & 0x0f0f0f0f;
    i = i + (i >>> 8);
    i = i + (i >>> 16);
    return i & 0x3f;
}

For 16-bit integers (short), the method can be rewritten to :

private static int bitCount(int i) {
   // HD, Figure 5-2
   i = i - ((i >>> 1) & 0x5555);
   i = (i & 0x3333) + ((i >>> 2) & 0x3333);
   i = (i + (i >>> 4)) & 0x0f0f;
   i = i + (i >>> 4);
   i = i + (i >>> 8);
   return i & 0x3f;
}

For 8-bit integers (byte), it's a bit more complicated, but the general idea is there.

You can check out this link for more info on fast bit counting functions : http://gurmeetsingh.wordpress.com/2008/08/05/fast-bit-counting-routines/

The fastest/easiest way for any integer, which is O(0) for the best case and O(n) for the worst case (where n is the number of bits in the value) is

static private int bitcount(int n)  {
   int count = 0 ;
   while (n != 0)  {
      count++ ;
      n &= (n - 1) ;
   }
   return count ;
}
share|improve this answer
    
On the last one: both theoretically and practically it's still O(1) for the best case. Also interesting to note that if you use typical large integer representations (e.g BigInteger rather than int) then the worst case can often be O(n^2). –  mikera May 24 '10 at 11:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.