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How do I write a swtich for the following conditional?

If the url contains "foo", then settings.base_url is "bar".

The following is achieving the effect required but I've a feeling this would be more manageable in a switch:

var doc_location = document.location.href;
var url_strip = new RegExp("http:\/\/.*\/");
var base_url = url_strip.exec(doc_location)
var base_url_string = base_url[0];

//BASE URL CASES

// LOCAL
if (base_url_string.indexOf('xxx.local') > -1) {
    settings = {
        "base_url" : "http://xxx.local/"
    };
}

// DEV
if (base_url_string.indexOf('xxx.dev.yyy.com') > -1) {
    settings = {
        "base_url" : "http://xxx.dev.yyy.com/xxx/"
    };
}
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4 Answers

up vote 128 down vote accepted

You can't do it in a switch unless you're doing full string matching; that's doing substring matching. (This isn't quite true, as Sean points out in the comments. See note at the end.)

If you're happy that your regex at the top is stripping away everything that you don't want to compare in your match, you don't need a substring match, and could do:

switch (base_url_string) {
    case "xxx.local":
        // Blah
        break;
    case "xxx.dev.yyy.com":
        // Blah
        break;
}

...but again, that only works if that's the complete string you're matching. It would fail if base_url_string were, say, "yyy.xxx.local" whereas your current code would match that in the "xxx.local" branch.


Update: Okay, so technically you can use a switch for substring matching, but I wouldn't recommend it in most situations. Here's how (live example):

function test(str) {
    switch (true) {
      case /xyz/.test(str):
        display("• Matched 'xyz' test");
        break;
      case /test/.test(str):
        display("• Matched 'test' test");
        break;
      case /ing/.test(str):
        display("• Matched 'ing' test");
        break;
      default:
        display("• Didn't match any test");
        break;
    }
}

That works because of the way JavaScript switch statements work, in particular two key aspects: First, that the cases are considered in source text order, and second that the selector expressions (the bits after the keyword case) are expressions that are evaluated as that case is evaluated (not constants as in some other languages). So since our test expression is true, the first case expression that results in true will be the one that gets used.

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20  
I know it's old, but this isn't quite true - you can actually do switch(true) { case /foo/.test(bar): .... –  Sean Kinsey Oct 15 '11 at 2:50
1  
@Sean: Ugh. Yes, you're quite right (lurkers: example), but don't go there... ;-) –  T.J. Crowder Oct 15 '11 at 9:38
1  
@NathanC.Tresch: It's not the regular expression part that's an issue, it's using switch (true) and then doing the test in the case statements. For me, an if/else if series would be clearer and more maintainable. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 20 '12 at 8:08
3  
Oh god, no! Switch statement is not supposed to work like that. This is simply broken, it should be illegal to do stuff like that. –  Pius Jul 19 '13 at 8:13
6  
Hoohoo, so deliciously evil. –  aditya menon Aug 22 '13 at 10:48
show 3 more comments

Just use the location.host property

switch (location.host) {
    case "xxx.local":
        settings = ...
        break;
    case "xxx.dev.yyy.com":
        settings = ...
        break;
}
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Thanks, +1 as this is what I should be doing really –  Dr. Frankenstein May 24 '10 at 11:47
    
You have to take care about the variable type you pass to the switch statement. It must be a string. To be sure you can do switch ("" + location.host). –  ceving Jul 11 '13 at 15:50
    
+1 for solving an XY problem :) –  Qix Feb 6 at 11:13
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RegExp can be used on the input string not just technically but practically with the match method too.

Because the output of the match() is an array we need to retrieve the first array element of the result. To avoid an exception error we enclose the regexp into an optional capturing group.

If the regexp fails, the output of str.match(/(find)?/)[1] will be undefined. In case if it succeed (the 1st element of the resulting array will have the same value as str), the case block will be evaluated.

str = 'XYZ test';
switch (str) {
  case str.match(/(^xyz)?/)[1]:
    console.log("Matched a string that starts with 'xyz'");
    break;
  case str.match(/(test)?/)[1]:
    console.log("Matched the 'test' substring");        
    break;
  default:
    console.log("Didn't match");
    break;
}

Another approach is to use the String() constructor to convert the resulting array that has just 1 element (result of a regexp without capturing groups) to a string. In case of a failure the null object will become a "null" string

switch (str) {
  case String(str.match(/^xyz/)):
    console.log("Matched a string that starts with 'xyz'");
    break;
}

Anyway, a more elegant solution is to use the /^find-this-in/.test(str) method which returns a boolean value

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var token = 'spo';

switch(token){
    case ( (token.match(/spo/) )? token : undefined ) :
       console.log('MATCHED')    
    break;;
    default:
       console.log('NO MATCH')
    break;;
}


--> If the match is made the ternary expression returns the original token
----> The original token is evaluated by case

--> If the match is not made the ternary returns undefined
----> Case evaluates the token against undefined which hopefully your token is not.

The ternary test can be anything for instance in your case

( !!~ base_url_string.indexOf('xxx.dev.yyy.com') )? xxx.dev.yyy.com : undefined 
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Your answer is confusing. Can you review and improve the example and the explanation? –  falsarella 2 days ago
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