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Since MySQL doesn't seem to have any 'boolean' datatype, which datatype do you 'abuse' for storing true/false information in MySQL? Especially in the context of writing and reading from/to a PHP-Script.

Over time I have used and seen several approaches:

  • tinyint, varchar fields containing the values 0/1,
  • varchar fields containing the strings '0'/'1' or 'true'/'false'
  • and finally enum Fields containing the two options 'true'/'false'.

None of the above seems optimal, I tend to prefer the tinyint 0/1 variant, since automatic type conversion in PHP gives me boolean values rather simply.

So which datatype do you use, is there a type designed for boolean values which I have overlooked? Do you see any advantages/disadvantages by using one type or another?

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Anyone who is reading the old answers to this question needs to understand that MySQL added a bit datatype in version 5. Use that information as you may. dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/bit-type.html –  smp7d Feb 29 '12 at 14:51
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Question related to Alternative to lots of booleans in MySQL? –  tereško Jul 25 '12 at 18:26
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for the current version of MYSQL Boolean type is available- dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/numeric-type-overview.html check this. according to that value zero considered as false –  DevT Aug 29 '12 at 8:51
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bit(1)'s a bit** to import in Excel. Switching to tinyint(1) works. –  Cees Timmerman Feb 18 at 13:24
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now we have boolean after 5 years –  V-SHY Mar 14 at 9:54

9 Answers 9

up vote 483 down vote accepted

For MySQL 5.0.3 and higher, you can use BIT. The manual says:

As of MySQL 5.0.3, the BIT data type is used to store bit-field values. A type of BIT(M) enables storage of M-bit values. M can range from 1 to 64.

Otherwise, according to the MySQL manual you can use bool and boolean which are at the moment aliases of tinyint(1):

Bool, Boolean: These types are synonyms for TINYINT(1). A value of zero is considered false. Non-zero values are considered true.

MySQL also states that:

We intend to implement full boolean type handling, in accordance with standard SQL, in a future MySQL release.

BTW: this is just a matter of http://www.google.ch/search?q=mysql+boolean+datatype.

Funny isn't it, this link, posted a few years back, has become recursive.

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Yeah, I'd go for either this or, for a CHAR(1) and store 'Y'/'N' or 'T'/'F' etc. depending upon the context. The advantage of using a small integer type is that you get maximum portability across RDBMS-es –  Roland Bouman May 15 '10 at 22:42
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Going for char, in PHP at least, will lead to more code as !$boolean will never evaluate properly without further processing. –  Mild Fuzz Jun 1 '11 at 20:58
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What about BIT(1)???? –  BMiner Dec 6 '11 at 19:21
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@Pecerier Nothing you couldn't google yourself, but ok, I'll bite. First of all, please take a look at data0type.h. Please note that innodb does not natively define a BIT type there. If it would treat BIT fields in the way you describe, surely we'd find some hint of its existence there. Secondly, read mysqlperformanceblog.com/2008/04/23/…. And don't hesitate to enlighten us which amazing MySQL clients in the "marktetplace" play nice with BIT fields. They will come in handy for whomever missed that article no doubt. –  Roland Bouman Jul 18 '12 at 22:02
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+1 for providing a google link that has the top answer as this page –  vegetable21 Apr 24 '13 at 10:00

BOOL and BOOLEAN are synonyms of TINYINT(1). Zero is false, anything else is true. More information here.

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The (1) does nothing more than determine how the value is displayed, if you're conscious about storage size then you want to use BIT instead –  JamesHalsall Mar 20 at 9:09
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@JamesHalsall: Actually, BIT(1) and TINYINT(1) will both use one byte of storage. Up until MySQL 5.0.3, BIT was actually a synonym for TINYINT. Later versions of MySQL changed the implementation of BIT. But even with the implementation change, there's still no "storage size" benefit to the BIT datatype (at least with InnoDB and MyISAM; other storage engines e.g. NDB may have some storage optimization for multiple BIT column declarations.) The bigger issue is that some client libraries don't recognize or appropriately handle returned BIT datatype columns. A TINYINT works better. –  spencer7593 Jul 9 at 19:37
    
@spencer7593 thanks for the info, didn't know that :) –  JamesHalsall Jul 9 at 20:07

This is an elegant solution that I quite appreciate because it uses zero data bytes:

some_flag CHAR(0) DEFAULT NULL

To set it to true, set some_flag = '' and to set it to false, set some_flag = NULL.

Then to test for true, check if some_flag IS NOT NULL, and to test for false, check if some_flag IS NULL.

(This method is described in "High Performance MySQL: Optimization, Backups, Replication, and More" by Jon Warren Lentz, Baron Schwartz and Arjen Lentz.)

[edit] I just realized there is a -2 vote answer already posted with the same solution. I'd delete this but I don't see an option to do that. I also don't agree with the down-votes because I find it a very nice solution.

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fancy trick! this is helpful if working with MySQL <5 and perhaps even a lighter footprint than BIT, however in an effort to comply with convention and slightly less computation overhead (logic vs exact value) I would say BIT is the better way to go. –  zamnuts Aug 13 '12 at 19:28
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Might be 'fast', but it obfuscates the data such that any new developer would have no idea what the column stands for. –  Richthofen Apr 2 '13 at 18:16
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This is uses the same amount of bytes as BIT(1) –  ITS Alaska Apr 25 '13 at 18:18
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Good luck getting an ORM to map nicely to this. –  Craig Labenz Aug 3 '13 at 21:55

This question has been answered but I figured I'd throw in my $0.02. I often use a CHAR(0), where '' == true and NULL == false.

From mysql docs

CHAR(0) is also quite nice when you need a column that can take only two values: A column that is defined as CHAR(0) NULL occupies only one bit and can take only the values NULL and '' (the empty string).

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That's a really nasty solution, you shouldn't even consider using that. –  Guido Hendriks May 15 '10 at 22:34
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mm, this seems like asking for trouble if you as me. I mean, depending on the language it may be too easy to not spot the diff between NULL and '' (for example PHP). –  Roland Bouman May 15 '10 at 22:36
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+1 I wonder why similar answer from @R. S. got 3 upvotes while you have two downvotes, may be you should quote "High performamce MySQL" –  Anurag Uniyal Jun 5 '12 at 16:50
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Thanks for the edits @AnuragUniyal! I have left this answer even though it has seven downvotes (not only two!) because I knew I did read somewhere it was actually a good solution. 7 people disagree, meh, whatever. :-) –  Josh Jun 5 '12 at 19:40
    
As it happens it has 18 upvotes now, so. I like the hack, to be honest. –  icedwater Feb 3 at 5:48

If you use the BOOLEAN type, this is aliased to TINYINT(1). This is best if you want to use standardised SQL and don't mind that the field could contain an out of range value (basically anything that isn't 0 will be 'true').

ENUM('False', 'True') will let you use the strings in your SQL, and MySQL will store the field internally as an integer where 'False'=0 and 'True'=1 based on the order the Enum is specified.

In MySQL 5+ you can use a BIT(1) field to indicate a 1-bit numeric type. I don't believe this actually uses any less space in the storage but again allows you to constrain the possible values to 1 or 0.

All of the above will use approximately the same amount of storage, so it's best to pick the one you find easiest to work with.

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Your remark concerning the ENUM is not true: try CAST(yourenumcol AS UNSIGNED) and you'll notice that False will be 1, and True will be 2. Another problem with ENUM is that it is too easy to insert '' (empty string) . I would disrecommend using this. –  Roland Bouman May 15 '10 at 22:40
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In my experience, using a BIT(1) field from PHP code was a bit troublesome. TINYINT(1) was a lot easier and produced more readable code. –  M-Peror Jul 21 '11 at 7:27
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@M-Peror - "using a BIT(1) field from PHP code was a bit troublesome"... no pun intended. :) But, yeah, I agree. I remember TINYINT(1) being easier, too... just can't remember why. Anyone else have thoughts on this? BIT(1) seems nicer on the surface because you can restrict to 0 or 1. I think BIT was sometimes interpreted as binary data (depending on the programming language and driver/library); whereas, TINYINT was treated more like a number. –  BMiner Dec 6 '11 at 19:29
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@BMiner - haha, it was really unintended, didn't notice that :) But indeed, if I remember correctly the bit field was interpreted as something binary, whereas the tinyint was easier to treat as a number and because of that, easier to use in a (boolean) expression. –  M-Peror Dec 21 '11 at 7:59
    
+1 for BIT explanation –  Chuck Savage Feb 18 at 22:20

I use TINYINT(1) in order to store boolean values in Mysql.

I don't know if there is any advantage to use this... But if i'm not wrong, mysql can store boolean (BOOL) and it store it as a tinyint(1)

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/other-vendor-data-types.html

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Bit is only advantageous over the various byte options (tinyint, enum, char(1)) if you have a lot of boolean fields. One bit field still takes up a full byte. Two bit fields fit into that same byte. Three, four,five, six, seven, eight. After which they start filling up the next byte. Ultimately the savings are so small, there are thousands of other optimizations you should focus on. Unless you're dealing with an enormous amount of data, those few bytes aren't going to add up to much. If you're using bit with PHP you need to typecast the values going in and out.

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+1 for the typecasting comment. To add on to this when working with programming languages avoid using lazy programming techniques in favor of consistency. Use identical operators instead of just equals. In the case of PHP if( $var == "" ) will be true for 0, false, null, undefined, and "". to test all of the values it is often best to use if( true === empty( $var ) ) as it will avoid the undefined errors as well. You should also validate the data type you are working with if( is_int( $var ) && $var === 0 ) or typecast it to force it into being a specific data type (int) $var for the task. –  fyrye Jan 17 at 1:35

Until MySQL implements a bit datatype, if you're processing is truly pressed for space and/or time, such as with high volume transactions, create a TINYINT field called bit_flags, for all your boolean variables, and mask and shift the boolean bit you desire in your SQL query.

For instance, if your left-most bit represents your bool field, and the 7 rightmost bits represent nothing, then your bit_flags field will equal 128 (binary 10000000). Mask (hide) the seven rightmost bits (using the bitwise operator &), and shift the 8th bit seven spaces to the right, ending up with 00000001. Now the entire number (which, in this case, is 1) is your value.

SELECT (t.bit_flags & 128) >> 7 AS myBool FROM myTable t;
if bit_flags = 128 ==> 1 (true)
if bit_flags = 0 ==> 0 (false)

You can run statements like these as you test

SELECT (128 & 128) >> 7;

SELECT (0 & 128) >> 7;

etc...

Since you have 8 bits, you have potentially 8 boolean variables, from one byte. Some future programmer will invariably use the next seven bits, so you MUST mask. Don't just shift, or you will create hell for yourself and others in the future. Make sure you have MySQL do your masking and shifting - will be significantly faster than having the web-scripting language (PHP, ASP, etc...) do it. Also make sure you place a comment in the MySQL comment field for your bit_flags field.

You'll find these sites useful when implementing this method. http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/bit-functions.html http://acc6.its.brooklyn.cuny.edu/~gurwitz/core5/nav2tool.html

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This seems just like a dreadful way to obfuscate intention to future programmers. Sure seems like a lot of trouble to save 7 bytes (assuming you are using all 8 bools in that single table!) –  yep Jul 15 '11 at 18:24

I just know this will bring in a record number of downvotes, but I got fed up with trying to get zeroes, NULLS and '' accurately round a loop of PHP, MySQl and POST values - so I just use Yes and NO. Works flawlessly and needs no special treatment that isn't obvious and easy to do.

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This post is very, very, very old. Your answer is also inefficient and wrong. –  Ghost Jul 9 '12 at 20:21
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Apart from the 'works flawlessly' bit... and the 'obvious and easy to do' bit. Not everyone has time to research multiple varieties of nothing... –  Geoff Kendall Aug 9 '12 at 12:44
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If you really wanted to waste this much space and compromise performance, you could have at least done CHAR(1) with Y and N options. –  AlanChavez Sep 19 '13 at 13:42
    
In most real world situations there is a real difference between a 'no' and a mere absence of information. For example, you may want to have a checkbox ticked by default if a user didn't actually say 'no' yet. Exactly how much space do you think you are saving, and how much processing do you do every time you need to distinguish between a false and a NULL - if indeed you even CAN distinguish? In a world of stored images and digital video, the bit or two of space saving is utterly irrelevant but the clarity and reduced processing is real. –  Geoff Kendall Aug 6 at 11:59

protected by Second Rikudo Jul 25 '12 at 18:06

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