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I'm wondering if anyone has any experience in "isolating" framework objects from each other (Spring, Hibernate, Struts). I'm beginning to see design "problems" where an object from one framework gets used in another object from a different framework. My fear is we're creating tightly coupled objects.

For instance, I have an application where we have a DynaActionForm with several attributes...one of which is a POJO generated by the Hibernate Tools. This POJO gets used everywhere...the JSP populates data to it, the Struts Action sends it down to a Service Layer, the DAO will persist it...ack!

Now, imagine that someone decides to do a little refactoring on that POJO...so that means the JSP, Action, Service, DAO all needs to be updated...which is kind of painful...There has got to be a better way?!

There's a book called Core J2EE Patterns: Best Practices and Design Strategies (2nd Edition)...is this worth a look? I don't believe it touches on any specific frameworks, but it looks like it might give some insight on how to properly layer the application...

Thanks!

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5 Answers 5

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For instance, I have an application where we have a DynaActionForm with several attributes...one of which is a POJO generated by the Hibernate Tools. This POJO gets used everywhere...the JSP populates data to it, the Struts Action sends it down to a Service Layer, the DAO will persist it...ack!

To me, there is nothing wrong with having Domain Objects as a "transveral" layer in a web application (after all, you want their state to go from the database to the UI and I don't see the need to map them into intermediate structures):

alt text

Now, imagine that someone decides to do a little refactoring on that POJO...so that means the JSP, Action, Service, DAO all needs to be updated...which is kind of painful...There has got to be a better way?!

Sure, you could read "Beans" from the database at the DAO layer level, map them into "Domain Objects" at the service layer and map the Domain Objects into "Value Objects" for the presentation layer and you would have very low coupling. But then you'll realize that:

  1. Adding a column in a database usually means adding some information on the view and vice-versa.
  2. Duplication of objects and mappings are extremely painful to do and to maintain.

And you'll forget this idea.

There's a book called Core J2EE Patterns: Best Practices and Design Strategies (2nd Edition)...is this worth a look? I don't believe it touches on any specific frameworks, but it looks like it might give some insight on how to properly layer the application...

This book was a "showcase" of how to implement (over engineered) applications using the whole J2EE stack (with EJB 2.x) and has somehow always been considered as too complicated (too much patterns). On top of that, it is today clearly outdated. So it is interesting but must be taken with a giant grain of salt.

In other words, I wouldn't recommend that book (at least certainly not as state of the art). Instead, have a look at Real World Java EE Patterns - Rethinking Best Practices (see Chapter 3 - Mapping of the Core J2EE patterns into Java EE) and/or the Spring literature if you are not using Java EE.

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Thanks for the book recommendation, I'll check it out. This diagram pretty much sums up what we're doing right now. I'm glad the title of the diagram is "typical application layering" and not "don't do it this way"... :) –  Tim Reddy May 24 '10 at 17:54
    
@TReddy: You're welcome. The above diagram illustrates a very common design and, yes, there is some coupling. But it's IMO not a real problem for the reasons I gave. And as @Bozho pointed out, I think that your biggest problem in your current architecture is Struts 1. –  Pascal Thivent May 24 '10 at 18:11

First, avoid Struts 1. Having to extend a framework class (like DynaActionForm) is one of the reasons this framework is no longer a good choice.

You don't use spring classes in the usual scenarios. Spring is non-invasive - it just wires your objects. You depend on it only if using some interfaces like ApplicationContextAware, or if you are using the hibernate or jdbc extensions. Using these extensions together with hibernate/jdbc completely fine and it is not an undesired coupling.

Update: If you are forced to work with Struts 1 (honestly, try negotiating for Struts 2, Struts 1 is obsolete!), the usual way to go was to create a copy of the Form class, that contained the exact same fields, but did not extend the framework class. There would be a factory method that takes the form class and returns the simple POJO. This is duplication of code, but I've seen it in practice and is not that bad (compared to the use of Struts 1 :) )

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+1 for no to Struts 1.0 and yes to Spring. –  duffymo May 24 '10 at 13:41
    
I probably should have left Spring out of the picture as my main issue (in a nutshell) is getting data from the front-end to the back-end in a clean fashion. Unfortunately, my company prefers Struts 1.x... Thanks for the answer. –  Tim Reddy May 24 '10 at 13:43
    
@T Reddy see my update –  Bozho May 24 '10 at 13:48
    
thanks for the update...I agree...Struts 1 stinks... –  Tim Reddy May 24 '10 at 14:17
    
It was a good start - it was the industry standard MVC framework. But all of its drawbacks were identified and better frameworks, like Spring MVC or Struts 2 were created. –  Bozho May 24 '10 at 16:12

I think your problem is not so big as it seems.

Let's imagine, what can you really change in your POJO:

1) name of its class: any IDE with refactoring support will automatically make all necessary changes for you

2) add some field/method: it almost always means adding new functionality what is always should be done manually and carefully. It usually cause to some changes in your service layer, very seldom in DAO, and usually in your view (jsp).

3) change methods implementation: with good design this should cause any changes in other classes.

That's all, imho.

Make a decision about technology for implementing busyness-logic (EJB or Spring) and use its facilities of dependency injection. Using DI will make different parts of your program communicate to each other through interfaces. It should be enough for reaching necessary (small enough) level of coupling.

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Thanks for putting things into perspective...we do a lot of DI in Spring...I was just hoping something "better" existed for the POJO...from other answers in this discussion, it sounds like Struts 1.x is part of the problem... –  Tim Reddy May 24 '10 at 14:16

It's always nice to keep things clear if you can and separate the layers etc. But don't go overboard. I've seen systems where the developers were so intent on strictly adhering to their adopted patterns and practices that they ended up with a system worse than the imaginary one they were trying to avoid.

The art of good design is understanding the good practices and patterns, knowing when and how to apply them, but also knowing when it's appropriate to break or ignore them.

So take a good look at how you can achieve what you are after, read up on the patterns. Then do a trial on a separate proof of concept or a small part of your system to see your ideas in practice. My experience is that only once you actually put some code in place, do you really see the pros and cons of the idea. Once you have done that, you will be able to make an informed decision about what you will or will not introduce.

Finally, it's possible to build a system which does handle all the issues you are concerned about, but be pragmatic - is each goal you are attempting to reach worth the extra code and APIs you will have to introduce to reach it.

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I'd say that Core J2EE Patterns: Best Practices and Design Strategies (2nd Edition) addresses EJB 2.0 concerns, some of which would be considered anti-patterns today. Knowledge is never wasted, but I wouldn't make this my first choice.

The problem is that it's impossible to decouple all the layers. Refactoring the POJO means modifying the problem you're solving, so all the layers DO have to be modified. There's no way around that.

Pure decoupling of layers that have no knowledge of each other requires a lot of duplication, translation, and mapping to occur. Don't fall for the idea that loose coupling means this work goes away.

One thing you can do is have a service layer that's expressed in terms of XML requests and responses. It forces you to map the XML to objects on the service side, but it does decouple the UI from the rest.

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