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How to properly construct regular expression for "grep" linux program, to find all email in, say /etc directory ? Currently, my script is following:

grep -srhw "[[:alnum:]]*@[[:alnum:]]*" /etc

It working OK - a see some of the emails, but when i modify it, to catch the one-or-more charactes before- and after the "@" sign ...

grep -srhw "[[:alnum:]]+@[[:alnum:]]+" /etc

.. it stops working at all

Also, it does't catches emails of form "Name.LastName@site.com"

Help !

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2  
Here's a better regex to match e-mail addresses, although it requires Perl: ex-parrot.com/pdw/Mail-RFC822-Address.html –  Thomas May 24 '10 at 16:30
    
@Thomas: my eyes.... –  Jefromi May 24 '10 at 16:31
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If you're not using (?:[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_``{|}~-]+(?:\.[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_``{|}~-]+)*|"(?:[\x01-\x‌​08\x0b\x0c\x0e-\x1f\x21\x23-\x5b\x5d-\x7f]|\\[\x01-\x09\x0b\x0c\x0e-\x7f])*")@(?:(‌​?:[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?\.)+[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?|\[(?:(?:25[0‌​-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.){3}(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?|[a‌​-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9]:(?:[\x01-\x08\x0b\x0c\x0e-\x1f\x21-\x5a\x53-\x7f]|\\[\x01-\x09\x0‌​b\x0c\x0e-\x7f])+)\]) you're doing it wrong. regular-expressions.info/email.html –  corsiKa May 24 '10 at 16:31
1  
@thomas that's just ridiculous!!! :D @glowcoder yours is bad enough but... that's the most convoluted regexp i've seen in 10+ years of using them :D –  oedo May 24 '10 at 16:36
    
Both @thomas and @glowcoder have stumbled onto the sad truth that email addresses are really complex. A lot more complex than most people realize. However, most email addresses are rather simple ;) –  D.Shawley May 24 '10 at 16:41
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5 Answers

grep requires most of the regular expression special characters to be escaped - including +. You'll want to do one of these two:

grep -srhw "[[:alnum:]]\+@[[:alnum:]]\+" /etc

egrep -srhw "[[:alnum:]]+@[[:alnum:]]+" /etc
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Sometimes, logins have underscores, so I'd add an underscore to the expression: "[[:alnum:]|_]\+@[[:alnum:]]\+" –  Edmond Meinfelder May 10 '13 at 19:58
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Here is another example

grep -Eiorh '([[:alnum:]_.-]+@[[:alnum:]_.-]+?\.[[:alpha:].]{2,6})' "$@" * | sort | uniq > emails.txt

This variant works with 3 level domains.

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This one worked REALLY well for me. Include uniq -c to get a count of all the email addresses! Sweet! –  Jess Jun 26 '13 at 17:22
    
Same here, this one worked amazingly –  Yuval Adam Mar 13 at 12:46
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I modified your regex to include punctuation (like .-_ etc) by changing it to

egrep -ho "[[:graph:]]+@[[:graph:]]+"

This still is pretty clean and matches... well, most anything with an @ in it, of course. Also 3rd level domains, also addresses with '%' or '+' in them. See http://www.delorie.com/gnu/docs/grep/grep_8.html for a good documentation on the character class used.

In my example, the addresses were surrounded by white space, making matching quite easy. If you grep through a mail server log for example, you can add < > to make it match only the addresses:

egrep -ho "<[[:graph:]]+@[[:graph:]]+>"

@thomas, @glowcoder and @oedo all are right. The RFC that defines how an eMail address can look is quite a fun read. (I've been using GNU grep 2.9 above, included in Ubuntu).

Also check out zpea's version below, it should make for a less trigger-happy matcher.

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Good answer! However, it's probably better to use something like [[:alnum:]._%+-] instead of [[:graph:]] because`[:punct:]` (which is included in [:graph:]) contains the @ character - which might lead to problems in matching - alongside some other characters unlikely to be found in email addresses. –  zpea Aug 16 '12 at 23:51
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I have used this one in order to filter email address identified by 'at' symbol and isolated by white spaces within a text:

egrep -o "[^[:space:]]+@[^[:space:]]+" | tr -d "<>"

Of course, you can use grep -E instead egrep (extended grep). Note that tr command is used to remove typical email delimiters.

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This recursive one works great for me :

grep -rIhEo "\b[a-zA-Z0-9.-]+@[a-zA-Z0-9.-]+\.[a-zA-Z0-9.-]+\b" /etc/*
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So you don't want to find my email address *@example.com then? (Yes * is a valid character) - and no I'm not at example.com, I changed that part :P –  jcoder Aug 17 '12 at 16:51
    
you're right, Characters ! # $ % & ' * + - / = ? ^ _ ` { | } ~ are allowed : stackoverflow.com/questions/2049502/… , -1 ! :) –  Olivier Aug 18 '12 at 21:24
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