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I have a grep expression using cygwin grep on Win.

grep -a "\\,,/\|\\m/\|\\m/\\>\.</\\m/\|:u" all_fbs.txt > rockon_fbs.txt

Once I identify the emoticon class, however, I want to strip them out of the data. However, the same regexp above within a sed results in a syntax error (yes, I realize I could use /d instead of //g, but this doesn't make a difference, I still get the error.)

sed "s/\(\\,,/\|\\m/\|\\m/\\>\.</\\m/\|:u\)*//g"

The full line is:

grep -a "\\,,/\|\\m/\|\\m/\\>\.</\\m/\|:u" all_fbs.txt | sed "s/\(\\,,/\|\\m/\|\\m/\\>\.</\\m/\|:u\)*//g" | sed "s/^/ROCKON\t/" > rockon_fbs.txt

The result is:

sed: -e expression #1, char 14: unknown option to `s'

I know it's coming from the sed regexp I'm asking about it b/c if I remove that portion of the full line, then I get no error (but, of course, the emoticons are not filtered out).

Thanks in advance,

Steve

share|improve this question
    
Hm, filter out emoticons? Is it related to this product? :-) –  Pavel Shved May 24 '10 at 18:54
    
No, it isn't. If you're really curious, this is related to an AI class where I need to label some data to train a classifier, but obviously I don't want the classifier to learn the emoticons upon which I'm basing the labels! :) –  Steve May 24 '10 at 20:51
    
You can probably get sed to do what grep is doing and combine the two calls to sed: sed -n '/selector/ { s/.../.../g; s/^/.../; p }' > ... or something to that effect. –  Dennis Williamson May 24 '10 at 22:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to escape / otherwise it will prematurely terminate the expression.

s/\(\\,,/\|\\m/\|\\m/\\>\.</\\m/\|:u\)*//g
        ^     ^     ^      ^   ^
          These need escaping.

You should also use single-quoted strings instead of double-quoted strings to prevent the backslashes being interpreted by the shell:

$ echo "\\,"
\,
$ echo '\\,'
\\,

So try this:

$ echo 'foo \m/ bar \,,/ baz' | sed 's/\(\\,,\/\|\\m\/\|\\m\/\\>\.<\/\\m\/\|:u\)*//g'
foo  bar  baz
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much! The non-escape-age of the / was the problem. Much appreciated! –  Steve May 24 '10 at 20:49
    
Alternatively, don't use / as separators in sed. e.g. sed 's;foo;bar;' –  Sparhawk Nov 9 '13 at 23:39

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