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I'd like to have a single project pom but have my GUI tests always run when I'm invoking JUnit on Netbeans, but have them conditional (on an environment variable?) when building on the command line (usually for production build - on a headless machine, but sometimes just for build speed).

I don't mind instrumenting my JUnit tests for this, as I already have to set up my GUI test infrastructure, but how do I conditionalize my pom!

Netbeans 6.5 with Maven plugin.

Any ideas how I can accomplish this?

Ilane

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3 Answers

The Surefire plugin can specify which tests to run.

You could specify different sets to run for different profiles, and select your profile using -P{profilename}.

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Can that specify which tests, or which classes? If the former - I think it would be too many tests and make the pom unreadable, if the latter, then I would have to split my tests into two classes, the GUI-specific portion and the model, non-GUI methods portion, which I really don't want to do. –  Ilane May 24 '10 at 21:09
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One solution would be to use a profile (that could be indeed activated by an environment variable) and to exclude GUI tests from the Maven Surefire Plugin configuration using excludes in this profile, based on a naming convention. Something like this:

<profile>
  <id>headless</id>
  <activation>
    <property>
      <name>env.FOO</name>
      <value>foo</value>
    </property>
  </activation>
  ...
  <build>
    <plugins>
      <plugin>
        <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
        <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId>
        <version>2.5</version>
        <configuration>
          <excludes>
            <exclude>**/*$*</exclude><!-- to exclude inner classes -->
            <exclude>**/gui/**</exclude>
          </excludes>
        </configuration>
      </plugin>
      ...
    </plugins>
  </build>
</profile>

Another option would be to use TestNG and to leverage the excludeGroups parameter.

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Yes, I think this could work for me, but with a little different twist - defining an environment variable for the surefire plugin in each profile: <environmentVariables> <GUI_TEST>true</GUI_TEST> </environmentVariables> I'm not quite sure how to get NetBeans to select a profile (I suppose I can make that the default, of course). I'll assume Brian's suggestion of using the '-P' option works on the command line. (BTW, if anyone can point me to an editing how-to for code snippets, I would be happy to read it!) –  Ilane May 27 '10 at 1:03
    
Why not use excludes? Our general setup is to have one JUnit class per project class. For a GUI widget, that class can have both GUI and non-GUI test methods. I always want to run the non-GUI methods. Unless I misunderstand you and Brian, the excludes works per class, not per method. Unless Netbeans is creating inner classes to implement the JUnit functionality, no inner classes are really involved to exclude. Many thanks to you and Brian! –  Ilane May 27 '10 at 1:04
    
@Ilane: I confirm, excludes works per class (and I'm not aware of a way to exclude methods with JUnit) so you would have to split your tests (or use TestNG and groups). Regarding profiles, it seems that NetBeans does allow to declare them. And the exclusion of inner classes is the default rule (as documented so I added it to not change the default behavior. Not sure it's required though, didn't check the source code. –  Pascal Thivent May 27 '10 at 1:56
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To achieve the desired behavior in my Maven project on Netbeans, I set up a profile defining an environment variable in my project's pom and modified the Test file action in my project's properties to activate my new profile. In this way I could check the enviroment variable in my tests. (This could have been done similarly with a system property.)

To keep from having to add a check to each and every GUI test, however, I found that I could add a JUnit filter, which would automatically ignore the UI tests in the case where I didn't want to run them and put the number of skipped tests in the test result line.

Here what my profile looks like:

      <profile>
          <id>test-gui</id>
          <build>
              <plugins>
                  <plugin>
                    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                    <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId>
                    <configuration>
                      <skipTests>false</skipTests>
                      <excludes>
                        <exclude>**/TestSuite.java</exclude>
                      </excludes>
                       <environmentVariables>
                        <GUI_TEST>true</GUI_TEST>
                      </environmentVariables>
                    </configuration>
                  </plugin>
                </plugins>
              </build>
      </profile>

Here's a description of how to update the Netbeans Action:

(Right click on project in Projects window)->Properies
    In Categories box, select 'Actions'
        In Actions box, select 'Test file'
            In Activate Profiles textfield, enter 'test-gui'
    Click 'OK' button to save.

To add the JUnit filter (and the documentation was sparse, so I may not have done this in the most effective manner), I subclassed the default test runner, TestClassRunner and had it call my Filter, which checks the test name and the environment variable. To get JUnit to call my class, I annotated the test class.


public class GUITestClassRunner extends TestClassRunner {

    public GUITestClassRunner(Class klazz) throws InitializationError {
        super(klazz);
    }

    public GUITestClassRunner(Class klazz, Runner runner) 
        throws InitializationError, NoTestsRemainException {
        super(klazz, runner);
    }

    @Override
    public void  run(RunNotifier notifier) {
        if (getDescription().testCount() > 0) {
            try {
                filter(new GUIFilter(notifier));
            } catch (NoTestsRemainException ex) {
                Description description = getDescription();
                notifier.fireTestStarted(description);
                notifier.fireTestIgnored(description);
                notifier.fireTestFinished(description);
                return;
            }
        }
        super.run(notifier);
    }

    class GUIFilter extends Filter {
        private boolean isGUI = false;
        private RunNotifier notifier;

        public GUIFilter(RunNotifier notifier) {
            this.notifier = notifier;
            isGUI = UI.isGUITestEnvironment();
        }

        @Override
        public boolean shouldRun(Description desc) {
            if (!isGUI && UI.isGUITest(desc.getDisplayName())) {
                Description description = getDescription();
                notifier.fireTestStarted(description);
                notifier.fireTestIgnored(description);
                notifier.fireTestFinished(description);
                return false;
            }
            return true;
        }

        @Override
        public String describe() {
            return "all tests except GUI tests if headless";
        }
    }
}


To call this runner, the test class needs to be annotated with:


@RunWith(GUITestClassRunner.class)
public class MyJUnitTestClass
{
    ....
    @Test
    public void testAlpha() {...}

    @Test
    public void testBeta_UI() {...}
}

So, now, from Netbeans, I just run my unit test class and the GUI tests automatically run. I can run from the command line with no environment variables set or GUI_TEST set to false, and my GUI tests are skipped, or I can run from the command line with GUI_TEST set to true, or use mvn -Ptest-gui and all my GUI tests run.

My sincerest thanks to Brian and Pascal for pointing me in the right direction.

Ilane

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