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I'm on a fairly new project where we're still modifying the design of our Oracle 11g database tables. As such, we drop and re-create our tables fairly often to make sure that our table creation scripts work as expected whenever we make a change.

Our database consists of 2 schemas. One schema has some tables with INSERT triggers which cause the data to sometimes be copied into tables in our second schema. This requires us to log into the database with an admin account such as sysdba and GRANT access to the first schema to the necessary tables on the second schema, e.g.

GRANT ALL ON schema_two.SomeTable TO schema_one;

Our problem is that every time we make a change to our database design and want to drop and re-create our database tables, the access we GRANT-ed to schema_one went away when the table was dropped. Thus, this creates another annoying step wherein we must log in with an admin account to re-GRANT the access every time one of these tables is dropped and re-created.

This isn't a huge deal, but I'd love to eliminate as many steps as possible from our development and testing procedures. Is there any way to GRANT access to a table in such a way that the GRANT-ed permissions survive a table being dropped and then re-created? And if this isn't possible, then is there a better way to go about this?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could grant select any table, insert any table, etc to schema_one, but that seems like overkill and won't reflect what you do in production (hopefully). Why can't you issue the grant at the same time as you create the table, while logged in as schema_two? I've always done that in the creation scripts, and only ever had to use an admin account to grant third-party or system privs. I suspect I'm missing something...

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1  
Yeah - for us this is part of the table creation scripts. I must also have missed something in the problem description. –  DaveE May 24 '10 at 22:31
    
Thanks; I actually didn't know about SELECT ANY TABLE privileges; I knew that there was no equivalent to GRANT ALL ON schema_one.* so I didn't realize that I could give a schema blanket permissions like this. –  Eli Courtwright May 25 '10 at 14:04
1  
That's probably not something you'd want in production, though, or should assume you'd be allowed to have unless you own that env too. I'm not sure why you can't just do the grant in the same script as the table creation; schema_two should be able to grant permissions on its own objects to anyone, and it would save you a step when you come to the production install too. Is there a reason you can't do that? –  Alex Poole May 25 '10 at 14:15
1  
@EliCourtwright - using SELECT ANY TABLE, INSERT ANY TABLE, etc privileges is a classic developer's fudge. It appears to get us out of one hole but then creates the potential for trouble when we come to deloy our app in a more locked-down environment (i.e. a live one). I agree with Alex that it would be better to solve the actual problem with your installation scripts now, rather than when the build gets broken in UAT. Heed the voice of experience ;) –  APC May 25 '10 at 15:30
    
@APC: In general I agree, but our case is more complex than I let on; we control one schema, the other is controlled by a different company, the server is controlled by a third company, so some of our installation scripts are real and others just simulate the other company's schema, so the GRANT statements will end up being in someone else's installation process... bleagh. So I'll keep your point in mind and when our design has solidified more, we'll probably stop using GRANT ANY and test only with the limited GRANT statements we know we'll need, since you raise a good point. Thanks. –  Eli Courtwright May 25 '10 at 17:32

So the reason why the grants get revoked is that the new table is a different object.

SQL> select object_id from user_objects
  2  where object_name = 'T72'
  3  /

 OBJECT_ID
----------
    659195

SQL> drop table t72
  2  /

Table dropped.

SQL> create table t72 (id number)
  2  /

Table created.

SQL> select object_id from user_objects
  2  where object_name = 'T72'
  3  /

 OBJECT_ID
----------
    659212

SQL>

The grants are on the object, not the object's name.

What I don't understand about your problem is this: you have a process which drops and re-creates the tables in schema_two. Why doesn't that process also grant grant privileges on those tables to schema_one? Why do you have an admin account do it instead? I presume you are connecting as schema_two to run the DROP and CREATE statements. Why not just add the GRANT statements to that step?

Because granting privileges on objects is as much a part of the installation as creating the tables. So you ought to have a process which does everything.

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What are you doing that couldn't be handled by ALTER TABLE statements?

The next best option might be to create a view that references the table that occaisionally disappears - the view won't disappear, you'd just get an error if the table doesn't exist in such a situation. IE:

CREATE VIEW table_vw AS
  SELECT t.* 
    FROM DISAPPEARING_TABLE t

Using * notation would also mean you don't have to continually update the view to expose columns in the table.

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2  
IIRC: SELECT * won't help if columns are added to the underlying table - Oracle converts the * to a list of columns at the point where it's created - adding another column to the underlying table subsequently doesn't add it to the view, and dropping a column invalidates the view –  Mark Baker May 24 '10 at 22:39
    
The problem with simply doing ALTER TABLE statements is that we'd like to re-test our table creation scripts as well as the script which initially populate the newly-created tables with data. Ideally we'd like to test this every time we make a change to detect breakage as early as possible. That's why we want to drop and re-create our tables. –  Eli Courtwright May 24 '10 at 23:12

You could have a DDL trigger or a batch job that runs every few minutes that grants privileges automatically. But that is a bit of a security hole and won't represent production.

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I suggest that you might give the account which you use to create the tables the ability to run the grants as well.

Share and enjoy.

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