Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using XMLHttpRequest, and I want to access a local variable in the success callback function.

Here is the code:

function getFileContents(filePath, callbackFn) {  
    var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
    xhr.onreadystatechange = function() {
        if (xhr.readyState == 4) {
            callbackFn(xhr.responseText);
        }
    }
    xhr.open("GET", chrome.extension.getURL(filePath), true);
    xhr.send();
}

And I want to call it like this:

var test = "lol";

getFileContents("hello.js", function(data) {
    alert(test);
});

Here, test would be out of the scope of the callback function, since only the enclosing function's variables are accessible inside the callback function. What is the best way to pass test to the callback function so the alert(test); will display test correctly?

Edit:

Now, if I have the following code calling the function defined above:

for (var test in testers) {
    getFileContents("hello.js", function(data) {
        alert(test);
    });
}

The alert(test); code only prints the last value of test from the for loop. How do I make it so that it prints the value of test during the time at which the function getFileContents was called? (I would like to do this without changing getFileContents because it's a very general helper function and I don't want to make it specific by passing a specific variable like test to it.

share|improve this question
    

4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted

With the code you have provided test will still be in scope inside the callback. xhr will not be, (other than xhr.responseText being passed in as data.

Updated from comment:

Assuming your code looks something like this:

for (var test in testers)
  getFileContents("hello"+test+".js", function(data) {
    alert(test);
  });
}

As this script runs, test will be assigned the values of the keys in testers - getFileContents is called each time, which starts a request in the background. As the request finishes, it calls the callback. test is going to contain the FINAL VALUE from the loop, as that loop has already finished executing.

There is a technique you can use called a closure that will fix this sort of problem. You can create a function that returns your callback function, creating a new scope you can hold onto your variables with:

for (var test in testers) {
  getFileContents("hello"+test+".js", 
    (function(test) { // lets create a function who has a single argument "test"
      // inside this function test will refer to the functions argument
      return function(data) {
        // test still refers to the closure functions argument
        alert(test);
      };
    })(test) // immediately call the closure with the current value of test
  );
}

This will basically create a new scope (along with our new function) that will "hold on" to the value of test.

Another way of writing the same sort of thing:

for (var test in testers) {
  (function(test) { // lets create a function who has a single argument "test"
    // inside this function test will refer to the functions argument
    // not the var test from the loop above
    getFileContents("hello"+test+".js", function(data) {
        // test still refers to the closure functions argument
        alert(test);
    });
  })(test); // immediately call the closure with the value of `test` from `testers`
}
share|improve this answer
    
What if the first block of code is in another .js file, included using the <script> tag? Would it still work? –  Chetan May 24 '10 at 22:56
    
Yes. "Enclosing Function Scope" means that your callback function extends its scope from the function it is declared in (which has the test variable). If the variables are not declared inside of any function, they will be in the "global scope". –  gnarf May 24 '10 at 23:00
    
Final question: If test is changing value inside of a for each loop, how come the last value of test is the only value that is printed by the alert(test); code? And how do I fix it so that it prints the value of test that was set during the call to getFileContents? –  Chetan May 24 '10 at 23:05
    
Please refer to the question edits for more clarification on the above question. –  Chetan May 24 '10 at 23:13
    
@Chetan - updated with notes on using a closure to solve your loop issue. –  gnarf May 24 '10 at 23:18

JavaScript uses lexical scoping, which basically means that your second code example will work just like how you intend it to work.

Consider the following example, borrowed from David Flanagan's Definitive Guide1:

var x = "global";

function f() {
  var x = "local";
  function g() { alert(x); }
  g();
}

f();  // Calling this function displays "local"

Also keep in mind that unlike C, C++ and Java, JavaScript does not have block-level scope.

In addition, you may also be interested in checking out the following article, which I highly recommend:


1 David Flanagan: JavaScript - The Definitive Guide, Fourth Edition, Page 48.

share|improve this answer

In this scenario, test will be resolved as you'd expect it, but the value of this might be different. Normally, to preserve the scope, you would make it a parameter to the asynchronous function like so:

function getFileContents(filePath, callbackFn, scope) {  
    var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
    xhr.onreadystatechange = function() {
        if (xhr.readyState == 4) {
            callbackFn.call(scope, xhr.responseText);
        }
    }
    xhr.open("GET", chrome.extension.getURL(filePath), true);
    xhr.send();
}


//then to call it:
var test = "lol";

getFileContents("hello.js", function(data) {
    alert(test);
}, this);
share|improve this answer
    
And how would I call the function getFileContents? –  Chetan May 24 '10 at 22:59

I ran into a similar problem. My code looked like this:

for (var i=0; i<textFilesObj.length; i++)
{
    var xmlHttp=new XMLHttpRequest();
    var name = "compile/" + textFilesObj[i].fileName;
    var content = textFilesObj[i].content;

    xmlHttp.onreadystatechange=function()
    {
        if(xmlHttp.readyState==4)
        {
            var responseText = xmlHttp.responseText;
            Debug(responseText);
        }
    }

    xmlHttp.open("POST","save1.php",true);
    xmlHttp.setRequestHeader('Content-Type','application/x-www-form-urlencoded');
    xmlHttp.send("filename="+name+"&text="+encodeURIComponent(content));
}

The output was often the response text of the last object (but not always). In fact it was kind of random and even the number of responses varied (for a constant input). It turns out that the function should have been written:

    xmlHttp.onreadystatechange=function()
    {
        if(this.readyState==4)
        {
            var responseText = this.responseText;
            Debug(responseText);
        }
    }

Basically, in the first version, the "xmlHttp" object gets set to the version in the current stage of the loop. Most of the time the loop would have finished before any of the AJAX requests finished, so in this case "xmlHttp" referred to the last instance of the loop. If this final request finished before the other requests then they would all print the response from the last request whenever their ready state changed (even if their ready states were < 4).

The solution is to replace "xmlHttp" with "this" so the inner function is referring to the correct instance of the request object every time the callback is called.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.