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My task was as follows : Create class Person with char*name and int age. Implement contructor using dynamic allocation of memory for variables, destructor, function init and friend function show. Then transform this class to header and cpp file and implement in other program. Ok so here's my Person class :

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Person {   
    char* name;
    int age;
public:   

    Person(){
        int size=0;
        cout << "Give length of char*" << endl;
        cin >> size;
        name = new char[size];      
        age = 0;
    }

    Person::~Person(){
        cout << "Destroying resources" << endl;
        delete [] name;
        delete take_age();
    }  

    friend void show(Person &p);

   int* take_age(){
       return &age;
   }

   char* take_name(){
         return name;      
   }

    void init(char* n, int a) {
        name = n;
        age = a;
    }
}; 

void show(Person *p){
    cout << "Name: " << p->take_name() << "," << "age: " << p->take_age() << endl; 
}

int main(void) {
    Person *p = new Person;  
    p->init("Mary", 25);

    show(p);

    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}

And now with header/implementation part :
- do I need to introduce constructor in header/implementation files ? If yes - how?
- my show() function is a friendly function. Should I take it into account somehow ?

I already failed to return this task on my exam, but still I'd like to know how to implement it.

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3  
If you don't already have one, you should consider getting one of the beginner C++ books listed in the The Definitive C++ Book Guide and List. –  James McNellis May 24 '10 at 23:29
1  
Sorry if it sounds harsh, but Your code really shows, that You have completely no idea what's going on. That's simply a fact. You really need to read something. –  Maciej Hehl May 24 '10 at 23:35
    
C++ isn't called cpp. The C preprocessor is called cpp. –  hobbs May 24 '10 at 23:52
    
Why are your definitions not separate from declarations? –  alternative May 24 '10 at 23:56

8 Answers 8

Solve many of your issues, by switching from char * to std::string. You'll be glad you did.

The std::string class takes care of memory allocation, and deallocation as well as copying.

If this is homework, convince your professor to use std::string for beginners and save char * for the section on pointers. Also remind your professor that the C++ langauge is different than the C language. This is one of those areas.

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Disagree. Any c++ programmer should know how to use char* strings as well as std::string instances. C++ is a much more complex language than C, but both share the same foundations and any C++ programmer should know them. –  oopscene May 25 '10 at 0:52
    
@ebasconp: Whether they should know it is a different matter from whether it is appropriate for this homework problem. So I find myself agreeing with Thomas. –  Steven Sudit May 25 '10 at 15:27
    
+1 there's no need to force people to use char* in C++ code except when interfacing with APIs that require it. It just complicates things and leaves room for memory leaks/mismanagement. –  Mark B May 25 '10 at 15:49
    
@Mark B Of course, there is a need. It's the need to make people learn, because they have to learn it, if they are going to use the language. You have no idea about the course and how advanced it is. The fact that one of the students knows nothing doesn't imply, that the requirements are inappropriate. Giving the advice for the professor is ridiculous. Would You like to be given such advice, by someone unknown form the internet, if it were You, who is trying to teach someone things, he/she really needs to know? –  Maciej Hehl May 25 '10 at 16:41

You don't need a * when using delete or delete[]. Just supply a pointer variable to it eg.

delete[] name;

Also, your take_age member claims to return a int* but you actually return the int member itself. You need to take the address of the member using & if you want to do that. As @Jerry has commented this is not what you want to do here.

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2  
...or change its return type to int. Returning a pointer to an objects internals is something you should generally avoid (and in this case, there seems to be no reason to do so). –  Jerry Coffin May 24 '10 at 23:37
    
@Jerry: Absolutely. –  Troubadour May 24 '10 at 23:40

Although some on this site apparently think it is completely acceptable, good practice (see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2859062/can-a-constructor-return-a-null-value/2859095#2859095), you should really refrain from doing things like stream operations within the constructor of your object. Do that stream reading outside and then call the function with the results.

That is, IMHO, the first step you should take.

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With all due respect, this is at best irrelevant, at worse completely wrong. The problems OP has come from having only a beginner's knowledge of the language, and are not helped by your doctrinaire advice. It's perfectly fine to have a constructor that deserializes, even if you personally don't like them. In fact, for immutable objects, it's pretty much the only way to implement serialization. –  Steven Sudit May 25 '10 at 15:29
    
Yeah, I suppose it's only good advice if they want to go out and get a job in the field. Although it's also good advice if they want to be a decent hobby developer. If all they want to be is a hack though, if calls to the console streams in the constructor gets the job done... –  Crazy Eddie May 25 '10 at 15:39
    
No, it's not good advice for anyone. I have seen no sound arguments in support of your conclusion that constructors must minimize their actions, and many good arguments to the contrary. Limiting yourself arbitrarily due to some sort of religious belief isn't an alternative to being a hacker, it's an alternative to being a competent professional. –  Steven Sudit May 26 '10 at 19:49

In a typical case, managing a pointer and block of dynamically allocated memory (such as the name in this case) is enough responsibility for one class. As such, Thomas Matthews is right: you should really use string in this case. If you're going to handle it yourself, you should still split that responsibility off into a class of its own, and embed an object of that class into your Person object. If anything, std::string already tries to do too much; you'd be better off with something that does less, not more.

Your deletes should exact match with your allocations. In this case, the only allocation is:

    name = new char[size];      

so the only deletion should be:

    delete [] name;

As far as friend functions go, you normally want the friend declaration inside the class definition, but the function definition outside the class definition:

class Person { 
// ...
    friend void show(Person const &);
// ...
};

void show(Person const &p) { 
     // ...
}

There are other possibilities, but that's the general idea. In particular, a friend is never a member function. What you had was a declaration of one (global) function named show and a definition of a completely separate member function -- that happened to have the same name, but wasn't really the same function at all.

That shows one other point: const-correctness. You were passing the parameter as a reference to Person. Unless it's going to modify the Person object (in which case, show() seems like a poor choice of name), it should probably take a reference to a const object. The same general idea applies to take_age() -- since it only retrieves a value, it should be a const function:

int take_age() const { return age; }

I've probably already tried to cover too much, so I'll shut up for the moment...

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I think you should investigate the following pieces of your code (like, what's beneath them, what happens here, etc...)

int * take_age(); // You should return plain `int` here, I assume


~Person(){
    cout << "Destroying resources" << endl;
    delete *[] name; // Do you understand why did you put `*` here?
    delete * take_age(); // Do you understand why did you write this? What behaviour you were trying to achieve?

And, actually, so on. Only when you're done with the basic stuff, I think, you can move on to header designing questions and friend functions.

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First off, kudos on trying to find the right way to implement your class, particularly after having missed the answer already.

From your description at the top, I think you may have misunderstood some of what was being asked for this assignment. First, my interpretation would be that setting the value of the name and age should take place in the init() function rather than in the constructor. As mentioned by several other posters, your constructor should simply initialize your class to a known-good state. For example,

Person() {
    name = NULL;
    age = 0;
}

Then in your initialization function, you can assign the values. Looking at your original init() function, it should probably be mentioned that simply assigning a pointer value (char *) to another pointer (char *) only copies the value of the pointer, not the data that it represents. Thus, for the assignment of the name value you need to calculate the size of the buffer you need, allocate the buffer, and copy the data yourself. A basic init() function would probably look like

init(const char *n, int a) {
    // Calculate the required name length plus a NULL-terminator
    size_t nameLen = strlen(n) + 1;

    // Free any previous value.
    if (name != NULL) {
        delete[] name;
    }

    // Allocate the name buffer and copy the name into it.
    name = new char[nameLen];
    memcpy(name, n, nameLen);

    // Store the age.
    age = a;
}

Finally, in your destructor you free any resources allocated by your class, in this case the name buffer.

~Person() {
    if (name != NULL) {
        delete[] name;
    }
}

If you have a book or something associated with your class, you may want to review the information on pointers. They can be a bit tricky but are important to learn. I suspect that is why the problem specified using char * for strings rather than the STL string class.

To your question about placing information in header and source files, it is often considered good practice to create a header file that contains the class declaration and member function prototypes and then provide the implementation of your methods in a separate source file. For some simple functions, you can provide an implementation directly in your header file.

The key when providing class member definitions in a separate source file is to provide the class name to properly scope the function (i.e., Person::). So your header file may contain a class definition like

// Header file (e.g., person.h)

class Person {
private:
    char *name;
    int age;

public:
    Person() { name = NULL; age = 0 };
    ~Person() { if (name != NULL) delete[] name; }

    void init(const char *n, int a);

    // Other method declarations and/or definitions
};

And then in your source file

// Source file (e.g., person.cpp)

void Person::init(const char *n, int a) {
    // ...
}

// Rest of method definitions

Source files that use your person class need only include the header file with your class definition.

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I think your problem is with this line: friend void(Person &p); What is it needed for.

do I need to introduce constructor in header/implementation files ? The constructor can be in the .h or the .cpp file. It doesn't matter. Generally if the function is short it is ok to include it in the .h file. Anything longer should go in the .cpp.

my show() function is a friendly function. Not sure what you mean by this. friend functions exist outside the class definition. Your show function is defined inside the class so does not need to be a friend.

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in addition to the previously posted answers, i've got two points of advice for you:

  • don't use 'friend'. some here may disagree with me, but 'friend' should really not be part of C++ anymore as it goes against what OOP stands for.
  • naming your methods: avoid naming your methods like 'take_name' or 'take_age'. conventionally, since those are getters, consider naming them 'getName' and 'getAge'. you end up with much more respect from developers this way.
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While friend can certainly be a code smell and there are often better ways, there are also places where it's pretty much needed, including within STL. It may not be pure OOP, but neither is C++. Agreed regarding names, however. –  Steven Sudit May 25 '10 at 15:33

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