Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I run my C++ program it crashes with this error.

* glibc detected ./load: double free or corruption (!prev): 0x0000000000c6ed50 **

I'm trying to track it down using cout statement but am finding it difficult. Could gdb make this easier? How is it done?

share|improve this question
3  
I wonder why everybody suggests to NULL pointers (which masks errors which are otherwise caught, as this question nicely shows), but nobody suggests to simply not to do manual memory management at all, which is very well possible in C++. I haven't written delete in years. (And, yes, my code is performance-critical. Otherwise it wouldn't have been written in C++.) –  sbi May 25 '10 at 8:32
    
@sbi: Heap corruption and the like are rarely caught, at least not where they happen. NULLing pointers might make your program crash earlier. –  Hasturkun May 25 '10 at 8:45
    
@Hasturkun: I strongly disagree. A major incentive to NULL pointers is to prevent a second delete ptr; from blowing up - which is masking an error, because that second delete should never have been happening. (It's also used to check whether a pointer is still pointing to a valid object. But that just raises the question why you have a pointer in scope that doesn't have an object to point to.) –  sbi May 25 '10 at 8:55
add comment

6 Answers

You can use gdb, but I would first try Valgrind. See the quick start guide.

share|improve this answer
add comment

There are at least two possible situations:

  1. you are deleting the same entity twice
  2. you are deleting something that wasn't allocated

For the first one I strongly suggest NULL-ing all deleted pointers.

You have three options:

  1. overload new and delete and track the allocations
  2. yes, use gdb -- then you'll get a backtrace from your crash, and that'll probably be very helpful
  3. as suggested -- use Valgrind -- it isn't easy to get into, but it will save you time thousandfold in the future...
share|improve this answer
    
how is it done in gdb? –  neuromancer May 25 '10 at 5:28
    
2. would cause corruption, but I don't think this message would generally appear, since the sanity checking is only done on the heap. However, I think 3. heap buffer overflow is possible. –  Matthew Flaschen May 25 '10 at 5:31
add comment

If you're using glibc, you can set the MALLOC_CHECK_ environment variable to 2, this will cause glibc to use an error tolerant version of malloc, which will cause your program to abort at the point where the double free is done.

You can set this from gdb by using the set environment MALLOC_CHECK_ 2 command before running your program; the program should abort, with the free() call visible in the backtrace.

see the man page for malloc() for more information

share|improve this answer
add comment

Three basic rules:

  1. Set pointer to NULL after free
  2. Check for NULL before freeing.
  3. Initialise pointer to NULL in the start.

Combination of these three works quite well.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not C expert, but I usually can keep my head above water. Why #1? Is it just so your program flat out crashes when you try and access a free'd pointer, and not just a silent error? –  Daniel May 25 '10 at 6:48
    
@Precision: Yes, that's the point. It is a good practice: having a pointer to deleted memory is a risk. –  ereOn May 25 '10 at 8:15
    
@ereOn: Thanks. I've just had a couple classes on C, and never had to write code that with anyone else, so never really had this problem. Seems like a very good practice though. –  Daniel May 25 '10 at 8:31
1  
Strictly speaking I think #2 is unnecessary as most compilers will allow you to try to delete a null pointer without this causing a problem. I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong. :) –  Component 10 May 25 '10 at 10:12
1  
@Component10 I think that freeing NULL is required by the C standard to do nothing. –  Demetri Aug 2 '13 at 18:34
show 1 more comment
#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int main()
{
 char *x = malloc(100);
 free(x);
 free(x);
 return 0;
}

[sand@PS-CNTOS-64-S11 testbox]$ vim t1.c
[sand@PS-CNTOS-64-S11 testbox]$ cc -g t1.c -o t1
[sand@PS-CNTOS-64-S11 testbox]$ ./t1
*** glibc detected *** ./t1: double free or corruption (top): 0x00000000058f7010 ***
======= Backtrace: =========
/lib64/libc.so.6[0x3a3127245f]
/lib64/libc.so.6(cfree+0x4b)[0x3a312728bb]
./t1[0x400500]
/lib64/libc.so.6(__libc_start_main+0xf4)[0x3a3121d994]
./t1[0x400429]
======= Memory map: ========
00400000-00401000 r-xp 00000000 68:02 30246184                           /home/sand/testbox/t1
00600000-00601000 rw-p 00000000 68:02 30246184                           /home/sand/testbox/t1
058f7000-05918000 rw-p 058f7000 00:00 0                                  [heap]
3a30e00000-3a30e1c000 r-xp 00000000 68:03 5308733                        /lib64/ld-2.5.so
3a3101b000-3a3101c000 r--p 0001b000 68:03 5308733                        /lib64/ld-2.5.so
3a3101c000-3a3101d000 rw-p 0001c000 68:03 5308733                        /lib64/ld-2.5.so
3a31200000-3a3134e000 r-xp 00000000 68:03 5310248                        /lib64/libc-2.5.so
3a3134e000-3a3154e000 ---p 0014e000 68:03 5310248                        /lib64/libc-2.5.so
3a3154e000-3a31552000 r--p 0014e000 68:03 5310248                        /lib64/libc-2.5.so
3a31552000-3a31553000 rw-p 00152000 68:03 5310248                        /lib64/libc-2.5.so
3a31553000-3a31558000 rw-p 3a31553000 00:00 0
3a41c00000-3a41c0d000 r-xp 00000000 68:03 5310264                        /lib64/libgcc_s-4.1.2-20080825.so.1
3a41c0d000-3a41e0d000 ---p 0000d000 68:03 5310264                        /lib64/libgcc_s-4.1.2-20080825.so.1
3a41e0d000-3a41e0e000 rw-p 0000d000 68:03 5310264                        /lib64/libgcc_s-4.1.2-20080825.so.1
2b1912300000-2b1912302000 rw-p 2b1912300000 00:00 0
2b191231c000-2b191231d000 rw-p 2b191231c000 00:00 0
7ffffe214000-7ffffe229000 rw-p 7ffffffe9000 00:00 0                      [stack]
7ffffe2b0000-7ffffe2b4000 r-xp 7ffffe2b0000 00:00 0                      [vdso]
ffffffffff600000-ffffffffffe00000 ---p 00000000 00:00 0                  [vsyscall]
Aborted
[sand@PS-CNTOS-64-S11 testbox]$


[sand@PS-CNTOS-64-S11 testbox]$ vim t1.c
[sand@PS-CNTOS-64-S11 testbox]$ cc -g t1.c -o t1
[sand@PS-CNTOS-64-S11 testbox]$ valgrind --tool=memcheck ./t1
==20859== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==20859== Copyright (C) 2002-2009, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==20859== Using Valgrind-3.5.0 and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==20859== Command: ./t1
==20859==
==20859== Invalid free() / delete / delete[]
==20859==    at 0x4A05A31: free (vg_replace_malloc.c:325)
==20859==    by 0x4004FF: main (t1.c:8)
==20859==  Address 0x4c26040 is 0 bytes inside a block of size 100 free'd
==20859==    at 0x4A05A31: free (vg_replace_malloc.c:325)
==20859==    by 0x4004F6: main (t1.c:7)
==20859==
==20859==
==20859== HEAP SUMMARY:
==20859==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==20859==   total heap usage: 1 allocs, 2 frees, 100 bytes allocated
==20859==
==20859== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
==20859==
==20859== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==20859== ERROR SUMMARY: 1 errors from 1 contexts (suppressed: 4 from 4)
[sand@PS-CNTOS-64-S11 testbox]$


[sand@PS-CNTOS-64-S11 testbox]$ valgrind --tool=memcheck --leak-check=full ./t1
==20899== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==20899== Copyright (C) 2002-2009, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==20899== Using Valgrind-3.5.0 and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==20899== Command: ./t1
==20899==
==20899== Invalid free() / delete / delete[]
==20899==    at 0x4A05A31: free (vg_replace_malloc.c:325)
==20899==    by 0x4004FF: main (t1.c:8)
==20899==  Address 0x4c26040 is 0 bytes inside a block of size 100 free'd
==20899==    at 0x4A05A31: free (vg_replace_malloc.c:325)
==20899==    by 0x4004F6: main (t1.c:7)
==20899==
==20899==
==20899== HEAP SUMMARY:
==20899==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==20899==   total heap usage: 1 allocs, 2 frees, 100 bytes allocated
==20899==
==20899== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
==20899==
==20899== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==20899== ERROR SUMMARY: 1 errors from 1 contexts (suppressed: 4 from 4)
[sand@PS-CNTOS-64-S11 testbox]$

One possible fix:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int main()
{
 char *x = malloc(100);
 free(x);
 x=NULL;
 free(x);
 return 0;
}

[sand@PS-CNTOS-64-S11 testbox]$ vim t1.c
[sand@PS-CNTOS-64-S11 testbox]$ cc -g t1.c -o t1
[sand@PS-CNTOS-64-S11 testbox]$ ./t1
[sand@PS-CNTOS-64-S11 testbox]$

[sand@PS-CNTOS-64-S11 testbox]$ valgrind --tool=memcheck --leak-check=full ./t1
==20958== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==20958== Copyright (C) 2002-2009, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==20958== Using Valgrind-3.5.0 and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==20958== Command: ./t1
==20958==
==20958==
==20958== HEAP SUMMARY:
==20958==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==20958==   total heap usage: 1 allocs, 1 frees, 100 bytes allocated
==20958==
==20958== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
==20958==
==20958== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==20958== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 4 from 4)
[sand@PS-CNTOS-64-S11 testbox]$

Check out the blog on using Valgrind Link

share|improve this answer
add comment

Are you using smart pointers such as Boost shared_ptr? If so, check if you are directly using the raw pointer anywhere by calling get(). I've found this to be quite a common problem.

For example, imagine a scenario where a raw pointer is passed (maybe as a callback handler, say) to your code. You might decide to assign this to a smart pointer in order to cope with reference counting etc. Big mistake: your code doesn't own this pointer unless you take a deep copy. When your code is done with the smart pointer it will destroy it and attempt to destroy the memory it points to since it thinks that no-one else needs it, but the calling code will then try to delete it and you'll get a double free problem.

Of course, that might not be your problem here. At it's simplest here's an example which shows how it can happen. The first delete is fine but the compiler senses that it's already deleted that memory and causes a problem. That's why assigning 0 to a pointer immediately after deletion is a good idea.

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    char* ptr = new char[20];

    delete ptr;
    ptr = 0;  // Comment me out and watch me crash and burn.
    delete ptr;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I didn't use any delete commands in my program. Could this still be the problem? –  neuromancer May 26 '10 at 1:57
    
@Phenom: Why did you not use deletes? Is it because you're using smart pointers? Presumably you are using new in your code to create objects on the heap? If the answer to both of these is yes then are you using get / set on the smart pointers to copy around raw pointers? If so, don't! You'd be breaking the reference counting. Alternatively you could be assigning a pointer from library code you're calling to a smart pointer. If you don't 'own' the memory pointed to then don't do it, as the both the library and the smart pointer will try to delete it. –  Component 10 May 27 '10 at 11:23
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.