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i created a singleton class and trying to access that class in other class but getting error "cannot access private member"

Setupconfig is my singleton class and i am trying to access this class in other class which have QMainWindow

Error  'Setupconfig::Setupconfig' : cannot access private member declared in class 'Setupconfig'
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////   
Setupconfig.h
static Setupconfig *buiderObj()
{
    static Setupconfig *_setupObj= new Setupconfig();
    return _setupObj;
}

private:
Setupconfig();

//////////////////////////////////////
EasyBudget.h
class EasyBudget : public QMainWindow, public Ui::EasyBudgetClass, public Setupconfig
{
Q_OBJECT
public:
Setupconfig *setupObj;
}

//////////////////////////////////////
EasyBudget.cpp
EasyBudget::EasyBudget(QWidget *parent, Qt::WFlags flags)
: QMainWindow(parent,Qt::FramelessWindowHint)
 {
 setupObj=Setupconfig::buiderObj();
 }
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I guess this needs to be tagged as "C++" –  Jujjuru May 25 '10 at 8:00
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Why are you deriving "EasyBudget" from the singleton class "SetupConfig"?

Remove that part to resolve your problem.

EasyBudget.h
class EasyBudget : public QMainWindow, public Ui::EasyBudgetClass
{......
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Thnaks... I compiled without any error but getting break at run time –  Sijith May 25 '10 at 8:58
    
Could you post more details about the problem at run time? –  Jujjuru May 25 '10 at 9:19
    
I did the same U said and getting runtime error..... Error is access violation reading memory –  Sijith May 25 '10 at 9:23
    
THanks Now working fine –  Sijith May 25 '10 at 9:33
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You should declare the static member in a source file not in a header file, whether or not you use the static class member or static function member approach. Your basic appoach should work, if the instance() function is a public member:

//setupconfig.h
class Setupconfig 
{
 public:  

static Setupconfig* instance();


private:
        SetupConfig();
};

//setupconfig.cpp
static Setupconfig* SetupConfig::instance()
{
   static Setupconfig* _setupObj= new Setupconfig();
   return _setupObj;
}

SetupConfig::SetupConfig()
{
    //....
}

Using the class member approach is also possible

//setupconfig.h
class Setupconfig 
{
 public:  

static Setupconfig* instance();


private:
        SetupConfig();

        static Setupconfig*  _setupObj;
};

//setupconfig.cpp
Setupconfig*  Setupconfig::_setupObj = 0;

static Setupconfig* SetupConfig::instance()
{
   if (_setupObj == 0) {
        _setupObj = new Setupconfig;
   }
   return _setupObj;
}

SetupConfig::SetupConfig()
{
    //....
}
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Try This

 public:
    static Setupconfig *buiderObj() 
    { 
        if(*_setupObj; != null)
        {
           _setupObj= new Setupconfig(); 
        }
    return _setupObj; 

    } 
    public:
    Setupconfig(){}
    private:
    Setupconfig *_setupObj;
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Getting more errror I think its JAVA format –  Sijith May 25 '10 at 7:32
    
Error 4 error C2597: illegal reference to non-static member 'Setupconfig::_setupObj' d:\test\easybudget\easybudget\setupconfig.h 64 EasyBudg‌​et –  Sijith May 25 '10 at 7:47
    
the _setupObj member would also need to be declared static for this tow work. –  David Dibben May 25 '10 at 7:48
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There are drawbacks in this approach, both copy constructor and assignment constructors (as generated by C++ compiler by default) will make a copy of the so called singleton class (here names: SetupConfig). You should also declare those tow constructors as private well.

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